10,934 reputation
11859
bio website livejournal.com/~_standback_
location Israel
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen 8 hours ago

I dabble in writing; I've become increasingly proficient in keeping my condescending nature in check. Haven't written much though. Working on that.

A lot of my experience comes from reading, from books on writing, and from blogs on writing. I've also done a lot of critiquing at Critters.org, and reviewing at The Fix Online. Science-fiction and fantasy are my natural stomping grounds, but everything else is good too.


Jul
4
revised Is there such a thing as talent in writing?
edited tags
Jul
4
comment Is there such a thing as talent in writing?
I think the comments there summed it up pretty well. This seems like a highly subjective question with answers that will be quite unsupportable; voting to close.
Jul
4
comment Use of past vs. present tense in works of fiction
Hmmm. I browsed through it again, and it's not the pure second-person future-tense I remembered - it's a (nameless) narrator explaining to the protagonist what's about to happen. But it's awfully close. OTOH, not a great story otherwise, IMHO - but then, the anthology it's in, Bisson's "Bears Discover Fire," has some really excellent stories in it :)
Jul
4
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is there such a thing as talent in writing?
Jul
3
comment Use of past vs. present tense in works of fiction
@Kate: It so happens that "Toxic Donut" did just that :)
Jul
3
comment Use of past vs. present tense in works of fiction
@Ralph: I've seen it done, once or twice; I confess I found it mostly gimmicky, though I remember the stories justified it fairly well. Terry Bisson's "The Toxic Donut" was one.
Jul
3
comment Use of past vs. present tense in works of fiction
It happens; I've never felt it to be common. And even then, it's very clear the speaker is relating something in the past - amusingly, practically the diametric opposite of fiction aiming for immersion but sticking with past tense :P
Jul
3
answered Use of past vs. present tense in works of fiction
Jun
30
comment How does the 10,000 hour rule apply to writing?
Clearly you haven't rewatched Galaxy Quest recently :P
Jun
30
comment How does the 10,000 hour rule apply to writing?
I don't think Gladwell's contending that. It's not that 10,000 hours makes anybody a prodigy; it's simply one requirement (often, a very difficult one). Here's Mette Harrison: "The part people are misunderstanding is Gladwell's insistence that there must still be inborn talent for the 10,000 hours to make any difference. He's trying to counteract the idea that if you're not a genius at first, then you'll never be one. And also the excuse that people give to themselves when they say they just didn't have the genius to begin with."
Jun
30
revised How should this ‘be going to’ be revised?
added 158 characters in body
Jun
30
answered How should this ‘be going to’ be revised?
Jun
30
answered How does the 10,000 hour rule apply to writing?
Jun
29
answered Do Fantasy novels have less readership than a Realistic Fiction novel?
Jun
28
comment Writing character cards?
This is pretty subjective - each author, even each author using cards, will have their own "system" and preferences. "What sort of details do you write on character cards" is very to simply "What sort of details are important when creating characters?" -- a very broad question. A whodunnit suspect will need different details than a lit-fic psychoanalyst. etc., etc.
Jun
28
revised Dialog, just what's the best way to write it?
edited tags
Jun
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on mla tag wiki
Jun
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on mla tag wiki excerpt
Jun
27
comment Publishing Fantasy versus Realistic Fiction (multiple questions)
Seconded - these are great questions, but the Q&A format works much much better if we can focus on a single question at a time. Possibly questions 1-3 can be combined into a single question - people will have comments about the entire publishing process as well - but the other two would be better off separate.
Jun
27
comment How do you convince your publisher that your story is good?
This strikes me as being way out of the league of most amateur writers. Building up an audience is tough. And if the piece is good enough to hook all those fans, and the author is good enough at promotion to get the word out to all those fans, then really, they won't have much trouble with the publishers in the first place.