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Dec
16
comment What is the story structure called when someone doesn't know they have the solution to their problem in hand?
A cautious (but appreciative!) -1; I'm not sure of the utility of taxonomic questions of "name this trope" or "name this structure," if they aren't associated with a practical difficulty of some kind.
Dec
16
answered What is the story structure called when someone doesn't know they have the solution to their problem in hand?
Dec
10
reviewed Edit Authoring tool for interactive documentations
Dec
10
revised Authoring tool for interactive documentations
clarification/tweaking
Dec
10
comment Doubts about editing?
Possible duplicate: writers.stackexchange.com/questions/3513/…
Dec
10
comment Doubts about editing?
What goal do you think you'll accomplish by editing now? Will editing now make it easier for you to continue writing, harder, or no difference? Is there anything you think you gain by preferring to do one of them before the other, or does it make no difference? </socratic>
Dec
8
reviewed No Action Needed What are the differences between narrative and descriptive writing?
Dec
8
reviewed Reviewed How can I edit my own, very old work?
Dec
8
reviewed No Action Needed Is it a bad idea to publish individual chapters of my book idea, online for feedback?
Dec
6
comment Getting started with TV writing?
Community - is this answerable, or is it overly broad? I'd be happy to hear opinions. Thanks :)
Dec
6
comment Getting started with TV writing?
This question is extremely broad and may be beyond the scope of this site. Have you tried Googling phrases like "screenwriting for beginners" or "screenwriting 101"? Those should have enough material to ground you a little, so you know the terrain a bit.
Dec
3
answered Is this America Star Books Special Services unsolicited email a positive step in publishing and marketing?
Dec
3
comment How to write a homosexual character, whose homosexuality isn't the point of the story?
cf. for example Orange is the New Black, which does an amazing job setting up groups and subcultures. You don't have "a black person" and "a Latina person" and "a lesbian person"; you've got big groups of pretty much every descriptor - and so each character feels like she's much more than just a representative of one specific minority.
Dec
3
comment How to write a homosexual character, whose homosexuality isn't the point of the story?
Heck, if you're the only lesbian you know, you have no actual change to your behavior or actions! You don't, and can't, actually do anything that would define you as a lesbian! But if you're one of a group, you can start asking, "what does the culture of the group look like", and also "what is this character's personality independent of the group." It can be very powerful.
Dec
3
comment How to write a homosexual character, whose homosexuality isn't the point of the story?
And I'm not necessarily saying you need it to be normalized - I see what you're arguing against there. But, the non-normal tend to band together, seek each other out, in one way or another. If somebody's truly unique and can't find anybody else like him, then the isolation and sense of sticking out are likely to overwhelm whatever specific element it is that makes him unusual in the first place. If you're the only lesbian you know - very little of your life is shaped by "what it's like to be a lesbian," more by a generic "I am different and weird and everybody would hate me if they knew."
Dec
3
comment How to write a homosexual character, whose homosexuality isn't the point of the story?
There are also some identifiers that people tend to stereotype (ethnicity, religion, sexuality), and others (tea-drinking) that aren't seen as being "representative" of anything larger. (Authentic representation of the mentally ill, since you mentioned it, can actually be a real, complex, and frankly fascinating issue.)
Dec
3
comment How to write a homosexual character, whose homosexuality isn't the point of the story?
Heck, fantasy novels tend to have "the dwarf," "the elf," "the barbarian," and most readers can't tell the difference between Merry and Pippin. :P
Dec
3
comment How to write a homosexual character, whose homosexuality isn't the point of the story?
@MichaelB: It's definitely not a requirement, but it can be a huge help. The problem is that some character tags have a tendency to overwhelm everything else - "the woman," "the black guy," "the Mormon," what-have-you. Sometimes that's not a problem, but other times it is - readers spotting a non-default character tend to assume he's meant to reflect that group in many ways.
Dec
3
comment How to write a homosexual character, whose homosexuality isn't the point of the story?
Some adjacent advice: I find stories trying to establish non-default characters matter-of-factly, work a lot better if you have a group of them. One lesbian becomes "the lesbian"; that can be overwhelming and feel stereotypical, and you run into the whole issue of how much build-up you need just to explain that she's lesbian. But if you have several lesbians, or many, then she's no longer "the lesbian" - she's one character among several, each distinct. That also means you get to establish the group or the norm, instead of the specific sexuality of that specific character.
Dec
3
answered How to write a homosexual character, whose homosexuality isn't the point of the story?