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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen May 19 at 10:19

Jan
17
comment How about a story as a series of anecdotes?
I really like this answer. Even if something deep in my head is telling me that fiction can be more than these four types, you have done a great job of characterizing some of the most common types of plot.
Nov
10
comment How can people doing technical, archane work be portrayed interestingly?
@Al C: I just re-read your question and noticed that you have quite strongly stated the absence of any details of his personal life. In that vein, my first paragraph might seem a bit useless, but i think the answer as a whole might still be able to help you
Jun
12
comment Are these fictional musings convincing or overwrought?
Great answer. This being essentially an issue of show-don't-tell is bulls-eye.
Mar
7
comment Should I prefer long or short sentences in scientific writing?
@DaveBall: I feel my comment is just a small addition to what Lauren said, glad I could help.
Mar
6
comment Should I prefer long or short sentences in scientific writing?
@Dave: I would suggest a mix too. The most eloquent scientific papers I have read do not seem to be forcing anything, concise points are delivered concisely, complicated points might be expressed in more structured sentences. You only need to interfere in your natural writing process if you are doing too much of one thing. Forcing everything to be short might make your points seem staccato.
Mar
4
comment How to improve/fix this short introductory paragraph and dialog?
+1 for creating the darkness.
Feb
26
comment Citing Myself As a Source
In case you were wondering, this is done all the time by established academic writers. Does look a bit odd reality-wise, but it's a great way to establish firmly all your background sources for the reader.
Feb
6
comment How far into a speculative novel should one go before introducing the central conflict?
That is actually true. Point 1 is terribly cliched. But writing with a fresh style and voice can enable it to be managed more subtly, instead of the filmish style of : Scene1: Car crash! Scene2: Twelve hours earlier. Man gets into car and drives off...
Sep
4
comment What are the best authors to read if you want to get better at humor and comedy in writing?
It's good to see another Dave Barry fan out there. As there are already many answers given below, I would just suggest here that you read all sorts of humor, whatever you can find. Then, stick with the type you think could come from within you naturally. I enjoy a lot of writers' sense of humor, but there are only one or two authors whose type of humor I believe I could do myself.
Sep
1
comment First Person Voice - Same as speaking?
That's right actually. Accents don't need to be spelled out, but I would still say the colloquialisms (probably what the questioner means by 'dialects') have to be consistent in order to provide a fuller identification of the character.
Sep
1
comment First Person Voice - Same as speaking?
I tend to agree with this one over Dale's answer. The only way to drive home the fact that the character has an accent/speaks a dialect is to make his voice consistent throughout.
Aug
19
comment How to create space
I especially love the 'theme' point, that was one of the things I was looking for but couldn't articulate
Aug
18
comment How to create space
Would you use the dog, plant, or meandering dialogue to shift perspective, and hence add more depth? As in to add an additional angle to the it than just my narrative? I think you are on to something with 'breathing room'
Aug
18
comment How to create space
I think that list would be great for a brainstorming exercise on what details to add, so yeah. Although I feel that the problem is not just 'sights and sounds', my mistake in framing the question
Aug
18
comment How to create space
John you might be right considering your experience on this site, but i did post a sample a while ago which got raided by the police here :)
Aug
17
comment How to overcome the fact that I can't write?
Well, Lorrie Moore got Self Help published at age 22, and one of my teachers who it seemed could like nothing less than the most esoteric of all literary works, eulogized that like it was a gem of the ages. So, point is, we can't be sure.