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I won't try to describe it, but here's how I would go about it: Put myself deep inside Brave's viewpoint. Notice what details she is taking in through her senses (see, hear, smell, touch, taste). Especially focus on her opinions of those sensory details. Whatever she has an opinion about, write that. Stay with her senses and opinions.


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Do readers enjoy self-administered vigilante justice? Or do they prefer moral heroes? Let me put it this way: A common trope in American popular fiction is the hero who lives by his (or her; cf. The Hunger Games) own moral code, a code that is not necessarily consistent with the law.


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Since it is a children's book, you can't use "umber" or "sienna" or complicated color words. (Heck, I still don't know what "khaki" is!) And you said you don't want to use food. That means you need to think of things that 1) are always (roughly) the same color, and 2) are well-known to children. Shades of brown are going to be tough. Random ideas that ...


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I enjoy dystopian stories on occasion, and the ones I enjoy the most are where your lead does everything right and it either makes everything worse or has no effect, often this is coupled with him finding out that that something deeper is happening. For your scenario play with the idea that after killing the twenty that they were working to accomplish what ...


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There is a lot of, often erotic, fiction that spends quite some time describing the sensual qualities of the surface appearance of people (color, shape, texture, smell, sound). Usually that literature chooses color terms that both describe the color well (we all have a clear image of what chestnut hair looks like) and evoke a pleasant sensual image ...



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