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The problem I see with writing (and drawing) is that people believe that they should be able to do it without any training. We all learn to write in school, we all can compose a coherent narrative, for example in a letter to our grandparents or a "what I did during the summer holidays" essay for school, and we all have been drawing since we were able to hold ...


4

Some of the most interesting and groundbreaking genre writing was written by authors who have come from literary fiction or another genre. For example, Tolkien was not a Fantasy reader or writer before he wrote the Hobbit and the LotR. The problem with fans writing what they love is that it too often turns into a bad rip off of the original. Just write ...


3

You identify two problems in your question. One is "how can I effectively develop topics out of thin air without research, or spending hours before actually writing?" This is a "what to write about" question, which is not on-topic for Writers. (Plus, there's no such thing as "developing topics without research." You may have done the "research" by reading ...


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I've found the best solution to improving creative productivity is to practice self-discipline. Discipline is also a skill, so it will take time to find a routine that works for you. Find an hour or so in which you believe you're the most productive and set it aside exclusively for writing, eliminate any distractions or commitments. Every day, go to your ...


2

I think your main problem may be that you're sitting down to write without the following: A PURPOSE Quite often, for an article, you're simply looking for an "angle". Angles don't just spontaneously come to us. We "look" for them. When I'm assigned to write about something particular, I research it, and I try to find an angle within the actual subject. I ...


1

I have a bit of a writing exercise to suggest. I used it myself when tying to "find my voice", and probably absorbed the idea from someone else. First, pick a simple setting that is fairly open-ended and adaptable to many styles and genres. Then (without any specific characters, plot, or ending in mind) begin to write a scene in that setting in each style ...


1

Your main problem/complaint seems to be that your thoughts don't automatically organize themselves. Take comfort. You are normal. Try the following (in order): 1) First, just get ideas down. I like to use FreeMind for this phase, and also a spiral-bound notebook that has no purpose except to jot down ideas. Note that "jotting down an idea" can run on ...


1

The "without investing too much time" part could be a little problematic, depending on what you mean by that. In my experience (and contrary to what a lot of people believe), creativity is something you practice. That means two things: It is going to take some time to get good at. Maybe a lot of time. In this sense, there is no getting around the amount of ...


1

I think you're just worrying too much about the act of writing itself. Just have confidence in what you're doing, and sit down and enjoy yourself. Of course, you need strong fundamentals for that (sizable vocabulary, good grammar, and a knowledge of what you are writing about). If you're having trouble developing your creative skills, then I'd recommend ...


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Basically a writer can write from two sources: her own experiences or research. Usually, even when we write about people who are different from us and go through experiences we have not had, we assume that there is a basic similarity between most human beings and that we can infer their emotions and thoughts by translating our own experiences into theirs. ...


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The comments on your post suggest therapy, and I think it is good advice. This is more than just writer's block or procrastination. It sounds like you have serious anxiety that's triggered by writing. Here are some things you might try if you can't afford a therapist. First, pick a book and copy the text out of it. This will help you get used to the ...


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Gee, I agree with what. You need a specialist. Something that helped me, though (I was a perfectionist, too) is this quote: "Art is never finished, only abandoned." - Leonardo da Vinci Give up perfection. Look at your writing as something that improves incrementally rather than something that is fixed. You can always come back and edit later; something ...



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