Hot answers tagged

8

Here's the most simple answer to your solution. Plus, I believe it will make your story better over all. More interesting and add facets that you will be able to explore that will surely make your story much better. The simple answer is: Give your antagonist a weakness. Design the Perfect Weakness For Antagonist Think about Superman. A difficult ...


6

Just keep writing. Writing is something you have to (and can) learn. So allow yourself the time (and many failures) to do so. Think of writing as being similar to learning a language or learning a craft. Practise makes perfect. Write what you care about. If you are not emotionally involved in what you write about, it will not touch your readers either. ...


6

Relax. You just wrote a bunch of sentences in this post. You're fine, you're just a little stuck. Do you know what happens next in your story? If not, your issue isn't with writing, it's with planning. Try to brainstorm and figure out where you're going. There are a lot of different outlining worksheets on the internet and you could try one of those. If ...


6

Personally I can't concentrate if I leave bad spelling behind me. the solution to that for freewriting is to either go back and fix it (which isn't according to the 'rules' of freewriting) or write about the fact that you can't go back and fix what you've written until something else comes to mind. The concept of freewriting is to limber your mind up, if ...


6

There are two kinds of writers: plotters and discovery writers. Discovery writers sit down and just type, literally "discovering" what happens as they go, and then must go back and impose a structure on the text at the end. Plotters outline and come up with the entire structure beforehand, and write along the skeleton of that outline. If you are stuck ...


4

For causes of writer's block, I point you to "The Writer's Brain: What Neurology Tells Us About Teaching Creative Writing" as one potential explanation, which focuses primarily on stress, feeling under pressure, or feeling threatened, which causes the brain to "shift control from the cerebral cortex to the limbic system": When the limbic system is in the ...


4

There are three main psychological reasons for writer's block: indecision, the blank page syndrome and burnout. Procrastination just looks like writer's block. Indecision comes from having too many choices. Enumerating your choices often helps with this. In extreme cases Enumerating the impossibilities help (the pixar method). The blank page syndrome is an ...


3

When you're looking for a job, you have (a) your skills, which is what you offer the company, and (b) your professional desires, which is what the company offers you. Examples: A graphic designer who (a) can work in print and on the web wants to (b) get more experience in creating responsive websites. A journalist who (a) has covered sports and local ...


3

Just skip to the next plot point and write that. Chances are that later on you'll think of a way to bridge the two, and then you can come back and fill in the details when that happens. I would guess that very few writers proceed sequentially through an entire work. It's good to jump around when you're finding yourself stuck; there's no point in stagnating ...


3

Maybe you already have a voice. It is difficult for writers to judge their own voices. You live with your voice all day long, in your head, so it seems normal to you, and boring. Other people (most of whom exist outside your head to some extent) don't live with your voice all day long. What do other people say about your voice? That said, I think there are ...


3

Consider changing the medium! If you put pen to paper, literally, you eliminate the physical problems keyboarding presents and you should be free to freewrite to your heart's content. As an occupational therapist with an interest in this area, I would be most interested to learn how this approach works for you! (I'm also theorizing on the response if you had ...


3

Lauren Ipsum has some great ideas to start with, and sometimes it just takes thinking more conceptually about the story to kick through. For instance, do you know conceptually what you want to happen next? That is, let's say your protagonist is in a bank but the next thing you have an idea for is him getting on a plane. Conceptually, you know you need a ...


3

This sounds like a blunt-instrument extreme variation of "Kill your darlings." The idea behind kill your darlings is that sometimes we as writers fall too much in love with our own voices. That perfectly-turned phrase, that exquisite image, that awesome scene, that character who's too cool for the room — we don't want to give them up. But sometimes ...


2

I'd guess the deadline pressure is blanking your mind. What I would do is this: You have everything in your mind. So stop thinking on it. It's time to live the story. Pick any scene or character or phrase that you feel anything about and take a day to write down the whole story from there. Allow yourself to daydream your tale and explore what it means for ...


2

It seems to me that whatever problem you have with writing is not about writing but about how you feel about yourself and your life. You might want to take a break from writing and try to come to terms with the death of your cousin first. Or you can try to take the pressure out of your writing and write without any concerns for quality and just to relax and ...


2

As can be gathered from the other answers, there are many causes of writer's block. It will be impossible to deal with them all at once, meaning you will, at some point, experience it. Don't worry. We all have. I've seen (and agree with) several answers mentioning fatigue and stress. Hildred also mentioned various forms of indecision, which is, in my ...


2

I always considered "finding your voice" something vague and meaningless, like "finding your inner you" or "finding your true self". What happens in reality is this: you copy your favorite writers, and then, gradually, their style starts merging with yours (that is to say, your own feelings, your own thoughts). Personal example: I started by writing like ...


2

Do you have some other parts of the story worked out? I would just jump ahead for now and write the next scene that you "know". Then, before you know it, you can fill the gap.


2

but the story involves an enemy who can perfectly anticipate your moves. This happened more than once on Leverage (a totally fun Robin Hood heist-of-the-week show; I highly recommend it). The Leverage crew is made of five bad guys who have gone good and run cons to benefit people. Unfortunately, after a while, each person's reputation becomes known, and ...


2

We could discuss specific solutions to your problem, but I think the general answer is: The ending of a story should be a surprise to the reader ... but not to the writer. I wouldn't spend a lot of time on a story where I have no idea how to make it end. If you come up with an interesting problem for the hero to solve, that's great. That can be a good start ...


2

I'm not the best at writing, but I do know a couple of things for you to remember if you still can't find your "voice". Here is a quote: This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s ...


2

If you enjoy a beautiful view, then a place where there is a beautiful view is probably the WORST place to write, because you'd be constantly distracted. Maybe for some people the right setting could help put you in the mood. I'm sure that wouldn't work for me. I recall when I was in college a teacher once gave the advice to always study in the same place, ...


2

I think this question may be a good one. Perhaps the writer thinks that he doesn't have the proper writing space and that's why he has the block. In my opinion, any place and any tool that works is a good one. Piers Anthony used to write in a storage shed with a typewriter on a card table. I'd never feel comfortable there. I had long writer's block until I ...


2

It really depends on how your brain works, and because of that, everyone's solution will be different. It will probably even change from day to day. Some days I like silence, but most days I like music. Some days I feel lonely and go to Starbucks (wishing for a more bohemian experience like when I lived in Portland!). For me, exercise helps, TV doesn't. My ...


2

For me, this method wouldn't work. When I write some idea, that idea is "satisfied" or "done" for me emotionally, and I find myself unable to write it again. This might be a personal shortcoming, making rewriting impossible or tortuous for me. But I also feel that the first version of an artwork often contains some raw energy, that is lacking from the more ...


1

Make your protagonist work hard himself to solve the problem of winning! Readers will love that, better than if the solution is easy. In your particular case, the enemy can predict the protagonist's actions. The protagonist should try hard to discover how the enemy can do that. If the predictions are based on a telepathy ability, then the protagonist could ...


1

Sometimes I find that it helps to move onto a different project. Once the pressure is off, you may find ideas come more easily and you can return to this story later.


1

If you're only doing the treatment right now, then why not spend some time writing a bit of the actual screenplay? Even if you end up not using it, you might learn more about your characters and/or setting that could solve your problem. According to legend, the screenwriters of Casablanca were unsure of how the central love triangle would resolve until ...


1

"Do you have any ideas for how I can keep writing when I don't yet know the logical solution to a problem the main character is facing? Any ideas for what I could focus on writing, till the idea presents itself?" Your problem has two aspects, a difficulty specific to your plot and what one might call a motivational aspect. Regarding the first, I can do ...


1

Worldbuilding SE can help you with a specific solution to your logic problem, but in terms of writing I'll offer a general solution to how to solve such a problem. If you're not sure how to move the plot from point A to point C via point B, then don't focus primarily on the plot for the solution. You can try to focus on how you will develop your characters, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible