Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

One of my favorite tools is a bucket tool, and it is found in the bakery where they use it for opening and closing 5-gallon buckets of frosting. It is a wicked cross between a hammer and a pry-bar. There are also cleavers, meet hooks and bone saws in the butcher section (in addition to the meat grinder that ate about 1/3 of a friend's hand) and of course the ...


0

Use the device that deactivates the tags they put on clothing/bottles/etc to stop them being shoplifted. She has to struggle to get her device/tag to fit into the machine/it doesn't work at first/it is urgent that it works immediately/whatever. Alternatively, have her make a chemical concoction that disrupts the mechanism. Think about the cleaning aisle. ...


0

You should use supernatural powers for the sake of the plot, not for the sake of "power" or for "cool." In one of my screenplays, I gave the heroine "supernatural" powers to fix a problem inherent in the plot. It's all very matter of fact (and treated as such), but when she's done, she is finally "appropriate" for the hero.


0

Don't introduce powers if you won't explore their consequences. The presence of super super-powers would affect every interpersonal, social and political action. Do you want your characters wondering and worrying if the shy nerdy guy is just socially maladapted or has chosen to isolate himself because he will literally explode with the force of an atomic ...


1

The short answer is no, having a slightly fantastic setting won't make your story harder to fall into, unless you do things that break your readers' willing suspension of disbelief. Rather than write a bunch of stuff about suspension of disbelief, I'll just direct you to this question from a few years back: What breaks suspension of disbelief? My advice ...


1

A story set in another world is harder to get into as the differences between what we (the readers) experience compared to what happens to people on the other world. The other answers are incorrect that it has to do with how good of a writer you are. What matters is how well the story you are writing connects to the reader. Plenty of fiction (mostly ...


0

I'm no professional writer but it depends on your target group for a young adult audience I would think to set it on earth despite some of the unrealistic parts I don't know much of other audiences but I think the main thing is the target audience


1

ultimately it depends how how good your writing is! Some are able to very fluently create alternative worlds and places and have a natural ability to describe the nuances that matter. So really it comes down to your skill as a writer. But then why do you need to specifically state where it is? Describe your world as a place that will have an earth feel ...



Top 50 recent answers are included