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In my experience, language that conveys higher social-economic status generally has a wider vocabulary, uses more complex or rare words (and more foreign words), is (at least superficially) more polite, and is more indirect and euphemistic. It tends to be abstract and emotionally removed, and can be poetic in a clever or intellectual way. It's basically an ...


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I'm not quite sure what you're asking here. Are you looking for a way to come up with exotic species or with how to convey their presence without actually showing them? If it's the later you could try this environmental storytelling and the use of stories within stories. Thomo already mentioned this and it's also something Tolkien did amazingly well. You ...


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Possibly, this might be better off on Worldbuilding. Either way, what do you mean by a feeling of many races/cultures? Even in Tolkien's world, the races did not mix a great deal, nor did people move around on a global scale. You could use a similar mechanism - the main protagonist, being human, has, of course, heard of the other races, but hasn't had a ...


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In urban fantasy style fiction with multiple supernatural characters, is it understandable to the reader if race names of each group are a combination of stereotypical species names (such as 'vampire' or 'fairy') with made-up names or regular names that have been altered somehow? A quick example for the sake of my question could be spelling fairy as ...



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