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10

Novice: Master, if I understand correctly, it looks to me like if we do [insert loop hole] that we could eventually gain unlimited power. Master: Yes, that would be the case and in the early times of magical exploration many magic users tried this. All of them disintegrated. You see, because of the [insert closure of loophole] that means that beings in ...


7

One of the big mistakes I've seen in some people's writing is that they focus on wanting to show the reader that "Hey, I've thought about these things and they are really important!" when they aren't. If you're story is going to be about physicists or chemists or other scientists dealing with the particular periodic table elements, then I can understand ...


7

Consequences. That something is possible within a system doesn't mean it's a good idea. You can drive your car 180MPH on public roads (if the speedometer labeling is accurate), but if you do you'll soon be getting used to a bicycle. You can subsist on nothing but Big Macs and Coke for a year, but you may face medical problems. You can make a deal with ...


4

The same solution as every decent DM has to Pun Pun. You Are Not The First Who Thought Of It. And the one who did think of it first really doesn't like competition. They are a background god, one who avoids spotlight and acts following own motives, rarely heard of. You rarely hear of them in particular, because the moment you think of a viable way of ...


4

This is one of those instances where understanding the history of things matters. If you're building a science-fantasy world with the equivalent of modern chemistry, have some fictional elements with distinct properties, and have any concern at all for the periodic table, you really only have four choices: Make the new element something strange and apart, ...


4

You don't actually have to care much about hard-core physics. If your sci-fi world is set in another universe entirely (Star Wars and the Force), you needn't even bother about following the periodic table or conventional physics. After all, the Force isn't even something the Jedi (in their Universe) can explain completely. It's okay to create imaginary ...


4

The one tool you need is expertise in the affected areas. How would you know what effects cheap robots replacing low-paid workers would have? By being an expert in psychology (how does it affect the persons owning, using or working with them?), economics (how does the changing money flow influence the economy?), job market (what would you do with the ...


4

As we've seen on earth, communities count time in reference to key events -- the creation of the world, the birth of a new religious figure, the beginning of a king's reign (these ones have less staying power), and so on. When calendar systems encounter each other (I say the year is 5774; you say it's 2014; now what?), some sort of reconciliation happens. ...


3

In his guide to productive academic writing, How to Write a Lot, psychologist Paul J. Silvia recommends that you perceive and organize your writing as a job: set aside regular and fixed periods of time for your writing do not let anything come between you and writing: neither "not feeling like it" nor a bored spouse must keep you from getting to work on ...


2

You need to keep three things in mind: If Page One of your story does not entertain the reader, he or she is unlikely to go on to the really good stuff on Page Two, let alone Page Seventeen. If there is one immutable rule of good writing, this is it. Exposition is usually less entertaining than action. That’s not an immutable rule—people do, after all, ...


2

This depends greatly on the writer. You might need to try a few different methods to find what works for you. For me: I dedicate four hours every morning. Measuring by word count doesn't work for me because I think different scenes require writing at different speeds, also: research. I need momentum to write, so I try to never leave more than two days ...


1

First of all, if a fiction book's purpose is "to show what will happen to the world, if something changes," then that's going to be one booooring book. Take, for example, Gattica. You might say the book's purpose was to show the effect of widespread genetic engineering on society -- and you'd be wrong. The book's purpose was twofold: 1) to entertain, and ...


1

A hint where you could actually place the new elements: You could put them in the island of stability. If some people expect half-lifes of millions of years, it's not much of a stretch to also put some stable element there (although a very long half-life may be good enough; after all, uranium is instable, and yet we even have quite a bit of naturally ...


1

Why plug it? Have the loophole pointed out or discovered in the epilogue. It can be discovered by the bad guy, or by an innocent who is easily captured/corrupted by the bad guy. Presto: instant sequel!


1

I recommend the book World-Building -- A writer's guide to constructing star systems and life-supporting planets, by Stephen L. Gillett. The author has a PhD in geology, and so he covers topics like plate tectonics, water and air, magnetic fields, colors, etc. The book also covers various aspects of planets and stars, orbits, gravity, seasons and tidal ...


1

The question to me is what you want. If you want to publish novels, then write novels. Bestselling author Elle Casey pumps out one novel per month. You need to get your priorities straight. If you enjoy worldbuilding, maybe that is your way of relaxing from writing. Other writers go jogging, play the guitar, or visit friends. You build worlds. So it just ...



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