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3

Outlines vary in how much text they cover; some people might write a multi-page outline for the same content for which another would write: Boy meets girl. Boy loses girl. Boy goes to mad-scientist school and builds a new girl. So the only way to know how your outlines map to word count is to take samples. Compare your previous outlines to word ...


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Word Count and Page Count matter nothing when compared to what they contain. If your story is in it's final form, it is in it's final form. It doesn't matter if it's one hundred pages or one. If you feel it can be improved by increasing it's size, by all means do so. If, however, you feel it is fine the way it is, leave it be. That being said: page count ...


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Check out Duotrope.com or Ralan.com for novella or novelette markets. There are about four to eight market buyers per genre.


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If it's part of the manuscript, you should include chapter titles and espcially epigraphs. It's not likely to be much, but anything that isn't front matter should be counted.


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I wouldn't count them, but word count is not any exact science. Publishers/agents want to know whether your book is 70.000 words vs 90.000 words; they don't care if it's 71982 instead of 72001


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Novellas don't seem to attract as large of an audience as novels, but they definitely have a place in the market. But if novellas are what you're interested in, definitely go for it! There are several well-known novellas out there, including (but not limited to) The Little Prince, Animal Farm, Three Blind Mice, etc.


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I just popped into my office and pulled a few books off the shelf. It's easy to estimate: Count up the total number of words on 10 random (full) lines from different places and divide by 10 to get the average words-per-line. Count the number of lines on each page to get the lines-per-page. Check that the book actually starts on page 1 - sometimes the stuff ...



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