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4

I would start by asking myself if that behavior 'types' the character or not. When other characters think of this character, is that the first thing that comes to mind? Is it part of the characterization? Then I would ask if the behavior or attitude I'm attempting to emote from that character can be expressed another way? Is the chuckle the typifying ...


7

Possibly the underlying issue is that you're trying to portray a particular sentiment or idea, and you keep doing it in the same way. In your example, it seems that you're trying to show that Abel is attempting to get a serious point across and show his firm stance on a situation, but not being too strict or overbearing about it. Him chuckling after saying ...


0

I'm not a lawyer, but I'll point you in a direction you may want to go. What you are doing sounds like something called "parody." It turns out that "parody" is one of the so-called "fair use" defenses for copying. More to the point, John Adams is not alive to sue you, and no one else can, on his behalf. In your case, you should "make a virtue of necessity" ...


1

Anything can happen, avoid telling the reader how they should feel directly. But if you think of something dramatic, extreme or awesome think about what characters may usually forget when they're in a burning inferno /building from how they got around 'slump'or 'heavy' to what they think or remember for short times. Just write what they may forget to feel ...


9

For the sensory input, instead of "you see/feel/smell/touch/taste," try moving the thing to the front of the sentence or phrase to make it the subject. Instead of "You see a shiny red rock," try: A shiny red rock glints in the gravel at the side of the road. This presupposes (rather than stating explicitly) that the reader is looking at the red rock ...



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