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Personally, I think it's the "satisfied" that throws it out. You could, perhaps try something like: A small chuckle escaped before he could suppress/stop it. He gave a small chuckle, briefly amused at something, before continuing on... He snorted, a small grin flashing across his face.


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If you are in the student's viewpoint, here are some possibilities: Write his opinions about: what's so funny what's so satisfying what makes chuckling inappropriate Say something like: He stifled a chuckle. He tried to stifle a chuckle. He snorted. ... Write whatever he notices about any noise or expression he makes. Write his reaction ...


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TL;DR: There is a spectrum of copying from regular story-telling that re-uses ideas and themes, to plagiarism, to copyright infringement. These are not all the same and only the last is illegal. The concept of plagiarism is not clearly defined. There is a spectrum of idea-borrowing and word-for-word copying that exists and some of it is acceptable, but if ...


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George RR Martin created the entire A Song of Ice and Fire because of the War of Roses. So did William Morris, I think he used a battle between the Romans and Gauls, I can't remember. Correct me if I'm wrong anybody. Anyways, using history is very common among writers. It's actually something most will encourage you to do. Just don't be dishonest with your ...


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First point, as Lauren Ipsum indicated, be very, very careful about taking a living person as your model. Taking a dead person as your model could also give you problems if that person was a writer (a category which could include people primarily famous for other reasons), and his or her writings are still in copyright. Whether this (putting in-copyright ...



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