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A word repeated too many times in close confines can sound trite, but look at the would-be repetition as an opportunity to exercise your creativity. Instead of looking for a synonym, consider the places where you would repeat Norwegian as opportunities to provide more information about the subject. To learn more about Norwegian, I meet with Dr BĂ„ngun ...


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Yes, there's a general rule against repeating a word, but like many rules, it must be applied reasonably. If you're writing about Norway and the Norwegian language, it's likely you'll have to repeat "Norway" and "Norwegian" a fair number of times. While common words can often be replaced with synonyms, proper nouns usually cannot. I would definitely NOT ...


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It's hard for me to give advice on word repetitions without seeing the whole piece. Just knowing how many times the word "Norwegian" is used isn't enough to allow me to comment.


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This is very difficult to answer with any finality so I'll present a few thoughts that come to mind and hope they help you: Your use of such words creates a style to your writing. Every author has a style and readers usually enjoy styles that are not common. So, having a style that integrates the use of outmoded, though perfectly correct, words would bring ...


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Flesh scraping across wood, shoes scuffing the floorboards in a last, feeble protest.


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How about, "the sound of something heavy -- perhaps a person -- being dragged across the floor"?


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While I agree with the technical points that Nathaniel and Dale make, in that it does soften the tone of what is said, I don't think it is something that should immediately be avoided. To me that is akin to telling a carpenter to avoid using a chisel. I imagine a carpenter spends a good deal of time learning how to efficiently use a chisel. I'm sure they ...


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In your example, the word may soften up the sentence and paragraph, but it remains spoken English, and does give the impression you're not entirely sure of what you're saying. Consider the following: So on this point I'll just stress that (...) vs. On this point I'll just stress that (..) In this particular case you can afford to simply remove ...


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In general (and in your question and example) it makes the text feel friendlier and more conversational. In some contexts, a more conversational tone can make your ideas less persuasive. Whether it works depends on who is reading, and why they're reading. The word "just" in your example has the effect of discounting the thing it modifies. The effect is ...



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