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1

In general writing, it is good to vary wording to avoid sounding repetitious. "I drove my car to the car lot where the car salesman sold me a new car." That sounds very awkward, almost silly, because of the repeated use of the same word. If I wanted to express that idea, I'd be much more likely to write, perhaps, "I drove my car to the auto dealer where the ...


0

As what's answer notes, academic writing generally values precision (using the most specific words appropriate) and accuracy (using words that most closely match the facts, even avoiding excessive specificity). Effort may be spent avoiding connotations and tone that would emotionally bias the presentation of truth, even avoiding favorable bias. Similarly, ...


3

If you write a literary text, vary your words. If you write an academic text, stick to the terminology and repeat it consistently (because very likely a word perceived by the lay public to be synonymous has a fundamentally different meaning to an expert).


0

When you're writing for English teachers who require variation in word choice, vary your word choice. For every other audience, prefer consistency, but don't be a slave to it. Vary the word choice when you have a specific reason to, such as the way the sound of a word fits with the sounds of the words around it.


0

In these kind of situations I use thesauruses to look for synonyms: http://www.thesaurus.com http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/hypnotized


0

Do research. a. Find someone to hypnotize you, and then describe what you have experienced. b. If you are afraid or don't want to go to all that trouble, find accounts of hypnotized persons. c. If you don't know how to find those, you need to learn how to do research (which is beyond the scope of this questoon).


1

You could try "in a trance": trance: a half-conscious state, seemingly between sleeping and waking, in which ability to function voluntarily may be suspended.


0

Yes. Not only is it acceptable, if you don't do it your character will not reflect what you are trying to portray and the reader will not understand the character as intended. Think of it this way: everyone is different, talks different, and behaves different. If you are writing about people, should they all behave like you? Or should they be different too? ...


2

For the most part an author should try to conform to grammatical conventions as that makes it easier for people to read. However, this isn't a set in stone rule. You are free to violate "proper" grammatical conventions in both first-person and third-person narratives. It is best if you have a decent grasp of the conventions you violate—that knowledge ...


3

When writing in first person limited view you are basically writing in the voice of the character. So you should make what they say authentic. Therefore in the right circumstances this is perfectly acceptable. My advice would be to leave it in and write the story that way. Then when it is done you can get a feel for if it "works" in that context. I have ...


-2

In scientific writing, usage of and/or is not preferred. Consider the following example: The equation uses A and/or B. (not preferred) The equation uses A, B, or both. (preferred)


1

Sure. There's a very famous book: Bartlett's Familiar Quotations. e.g. http://www.amazon.com/Bartletts-Familiar-Quotations-Geoffrey-OBrien/dp/0316017590/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430161531&sr=8-1&keywords=bartlets+familiar+quotations I've seen quite a few websites of clever quips and quotes. For example, brainyquote.com, quotationspage.com, etc. ...


5

I would not recommend using and/or. There are a number of style guides and English references that severely criticize it. For example: Chicago Manual of Style ("Avoid this Janus-faced term. It can often be replaced by and or or with no loss in meaning.") Strunk and White ("damages a sentence and often leads to confusion or ambiguity") Fowler's English ...


4

Unlike Steven Drennon, I feel that in general "and/or" is not good writing, both in fiction and non-fiction. While writing is not spoken language, it is generally intended to be read – by a "silent" reader, who, as studies have shown, will nevertheless usually subvocalize and stumble over "unspeakable", purely written constructs; by the author in a public ...


5

I don't generally see anything wrong with using "and/or" in fiction, but you need to make sure that it is used in an appropriate way. You need to look at your writing as two separate sentences and make sure that they each come across the way you intended. He planned to let Fields take the lead and try not to slow him down and get killed. He ...



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