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26

Many competent writers will challenge the assertion that "the perpendicular pronoun" (I) really needs to be avoided. Others seem to believe that only third person is acceptable, or that no person should ever be mentioned unless specifically talking about people. My own take is that this is all a matter of style, and whatever you pick -- as long as it ...


19

Competence precludes finding oneself needing to mean "I" but having to say "this writer" - or, variously: the author your correspondent this ink-stained wretch (please, no!) TBH, the form hardly matters - silk purses and sow's ears, etc.


17

In science, it is quite common to use "we" instead of "I" even if there is only one author.


12

I can think of four ways to lessen the repetitive use of sentences starting with a nominative pronoun like "She" (other than using the person's name). Changing the subject to a part or aspect of the character In some cases, one can present the action as performed by some part or aspect of the person. While this will typically use the genitive form of the ...


8

Use of pronouns like "I" and "me" in a narrative will tend to cast the writer as the protagonist. Use of other forms such as "yours truly" or non-reflexive "myself" tends to cast the author into a "supporting character" role. Suppose someone is writing about Mr. Smith's performance in a chess tournament and, after saying "In round one, Mr. Smith played ...


8

There are many synonyms to but. For the meaning you are pointing out in your question, some of them would be still, nevertheless, nonetheless, though, although, and yet. You can find these and the ones for the other meanings in any site with synonyms lookup function, such as Thesaurus ("but" synonyms). However, it should be noted that it can be ...


6

When I hear market, I see a teeny tiny bit of organization, stacks of fresh oranges, an early morning crowd and a women talking about inviting her husband's boss and his wife over for dinner. When I hear the word bazaar, I see a dense street; stalls lining up on both sides of the street, aromas of different spices, a dense crowd and a fast chase scene. It ...


5

It is like writing English. Obviously people in a fantasy world or the far future won't speak English, yet you present their dialogue in English (or whatever language you write in). Does that put readers off? Certainly not. Writing in a fantasy language is what would put readers off! Terms are the same. If you use the current (in your language) general term ...


5

I think it's pretty much by ear. You have to go with what sounds good. In this case, the writer thought "people" was important enough to repeat. I happen to agree with you that "them" would have been sufficient, but sometimes the repetition works. For example: government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. ...


4

I often run into this problem too. I think in the end it usually sounds redundant anyways but I use phrases like "the data suggest" or "the results suggest" in the discussion and in the introduction I usually just state the claim without attributing it to myself since it's assumed it is "this study" (unless it's cited information). You don't technically have ...


3

Trying to avoid the word "I" often leads to convoluted prose. The active voice and use of "I" result in easy-to-read, unambiguous sentences. So unless the style guide of your university forbids the use of "I", I wouldn't worry and use the active voice. Here's an example of a thesis style guide that recommends the use of active voice.


3

Looking in the dictionary, the word bazaar is a marketplace especially one in the Middle East. Those Indian writers might be accustomed in using the word "bazaar" instead of "market" (although India is not actually part of Middle East). Another definition of bazaar is (esp in the Orient) a market area, esp a street of small stalls. Bazaar is used ...


3

Honestly, I don't see the problem with many of the uses in your example. The first example reads well. In the second I would remove the first "but." The third and fourth sound fine to my ears. I second the advice that too much variety is potentially more distracting than the repetition.


3

An excellent question, and a permanent source of controversy and disagreement in fantasy and science fiction. Let's try to break this down: Basics of worldbuilding. You cannot construct an entire world out of whole cloth. It's simply not possible, primarily because the world is much larger than most of us tend to notice on a day-to-day basis. If your ...


2

But is a conjunction that has a specific place and a specific meaning. It strikes me that your issue isn't so much with overusing the word "but" but* with using repetitive sentence structure. Please note, for instance, that you really, really aren't supposed to start a sentence with a conjunction because the whole point of a conjunction is to link two items ...


2

The number one rule of writing is know your audience. In this case, you have a very specific audience - perhaps one or two people initially. So why not put on your "investigator's hat" and call them up and find out exactly what they want? First get some practice calling some other universities, and get a little more experience in the kinds of questions ...


2

For my editing markup I prefer a style that does not overlap and interfere with what might be part of the text I am editing. Since square brackets indicate comments or amendments in quotes in some editing styles, e.g. Rogers found in his study that "some [apples] are tasty". or destroyed text when transcribing manuscripts, I do not use them for ...


2

Similar to Dale, I'd use square brackets and color the word magenta. The magenta is a crossover from my design job, where anything in magenta is placeholder text. Magenta in a writing context would immediately signal to me "This item needs to be changed or replaced in some fashion."


2

When I'm writing, I simply mark the word for later review. How I mark it depends on my writing tool: highlight by changing the background or foreground color, insert a note or comment, wrap in [square brackets], some other way.


2

There isn't a standard syntax for this. I've had the same experience in my own writing, and have even seen a need for formal ambiguity in written text, such as a sci-fi "translation" from an alien language. The practice I use is parenthesis around the questionable content, which allows for a phrase to be inserted instead of just a single word.


2

I see two main contexts: The author of the work is also relevant to the subject under discussion. Then the author should use the third person and a name. "Reports must be submitted in triplicate to both Itsme and Steve Jessop". "Mr. Jessop has responsibility for X, whereas Itsme handles Y". It might matter which of us wrote that text, we might have ...


2

Personally, if it's to be satirical, I'd forfeit all "may, might, could" etc. I'd go with Simple Present, then augment every single claim with "or not." In the year 3000 all religions are recognized as highly infective memetic diseases. Or not. All "infected/believers" are quarantined in closed "holy cities". Or not.


1

If you use obscure terms most readers never heard of, you're bound to alienate the readers. For me quipao doesn't elicit any connotations; I don't know this word, so it will be entirely alien to me. If the world has no connection to Earth whatsoever, you'd better have a very good excuse for them developing a copy of Chinese culture. A dimensional gate? A ...


1

I see your problem. This is something that I run into all the time. When you can't figure out the right word. just use a free online dictionary and go through the synonym list for the word you decided doesn't sound right.


1

Idiom is defined as: an expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meanings of its constituent elements, as in "kick the bucket";; OR -- a construction or expression of one language whose parts correspond to elements in another language but whose total structure or meaning is not matched in the same way in the second language. Not sure if ...


1

In the natural sciences, the use of the personal pronouns "I" (for one author) and "we" (for two or more authors) is perfectly fine. In fact, you must use these pronouns, if you refer to yourself! For example the Manual (2009) of the American Psychological Association clearly states (pp. 69-70): Attribution. Inappropriately or illogically attribution ...


1

1) If the ? is for yourself, then use two in row, which would never show up in regular text. That way you can search for them before submitting. 2) If the ? is for the reader, then I'd say never ever do that. It's the writer's job to find the right word or phrase! You don't put a placeholder there with "punctuation" to indicate that it's not right. ...


1

In addition to the other good answers, "but ..." is a negation or restriction of the thing or condition it refers to. It "takes away" from it. It also breaks the flow of thought/action (which is fine when it's on purpose.) Many people use this in speech and writing all the time as a matter of habit, even when it's not really necessary or appropriate. A lot ...



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