Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

I can think of four ways to lessen the repetitive use of sentences starting with a nominative pronoun like "She" (other than using the person's name). Changing the subject to a part or aspect of the character In some cases, one can present the action as performed by some part or aspect of the person. While this will typically use the genitive form of the ...


8

There are many synonyms to but. For the meaning you are pointing out in your question, some of them would be still, nevertheless, nonetheless, though, although, and yet. You can find these and the ones for the other meanings in any site with synonyms lookup function, such as Thesaurus ("but" synonyms). However, it should be noted that it can be ...


6

When I hear market, I see a teeny tiny bit of organization, stacks of fresh oranges, an early morning crowd and a women talking about inviting her husband's boss and his wife over for dinner. When I hear the word bazaar, I see a dense street; stalls lining up on both sides of the street, aromas of different spices, a dense crowd and a fast chase scene. It ...


6

Don't over-complicate things. You are an Author. "Authored by _." It would make more sense for you to write, "As told by (grandmother's name). Translated by (daughter's name). Authored by (your name)." Use an introduction to tell how this story came to be, which will explain each of your roles and your motivations.


5

I think it's pretty much by ear. You have to go with what sounds good. In this case, the writer thought "people" was important enough to repeat. I happen to agree with you that "them" would have been sufficient, but sometimes the repetition works. For example: government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. ...


4

For a couple who have just married: Newlyweds For a couple about to marry, these are best I can come up with: Impending newlyweds Bride and groom


4

I'd go with "Edited by." You are not the author (the originator). You took existing work and edited it to make it readable. I think "edited" makes your relationship to the work clear.


4

I often run into this problem too. I think in the end it usually sounds redundant anyways but I use phrases like "the data suggest" or "the results suggest" in the discussion and in the introduction I usually just state the claim without attributing it to myself since it's assumed it is "this study" (unless it's cited information). You don't technically have ...


3

Trying to avoid the word "I" often leads to convoluted prose. The active voice and use of "I" result in easy-to-read, unambiguous sentences. So unless the style guide of your university forbids the use of "I", I wouldn't worry and use the active voice. Here's an example of a thesis style guide that recommends the use of active voice.


3

Looking in the dictionary, the word bazaar is a marketplace especially one in the Middle East. Those Indian writers might be accustomed in using the word "bazaar" instead of "market" (although India is not actually part of Middle East). Another definition of bazaar is (esp in the Orient) a market area, esp a street of small stalls. Bazaar is used ...


3

The border between Metilda and Lauren's answers is fuzzy and depends on how much of editing you did. If you took the story nearly verbatim, translated it, polished rough edges, added some preface and made it a smooth reading, you're the editor. If you retold that story, say, changing POV, making a set of memories into a smoothly flowing novel leaving no ...


3

Honestly, I don't see the problem with many of the uses in your example. The first example reads well. In the second I would remove the first "but." The third and fourth sound fine to my ears. I second the advice that too much variety is potentially more distracting than the repetition.


2

From the moment they say their vows and for the next few months or so, a couple are called "newlyweds". During the wedding, they are called the "bride and groom". A recently-married woman is sometimes referred to as "so-and-so's bride". A couple who are soon to be married are generally called an "engaged couple". The woman is often called the ...


2

The number one rule of writing is know your audience. In this case, you have a very specific audience - perhaps one or two people initially. So why not put on your "investigator's hat" and call them up and find out exactly what they want? First get some practice calling some other universities, and get a little more experience in the kinds of questions ...


2

But is a conjunction that has a specific place and a specific meaning. It strikes me that your issue isn't so much with overusing the word "but" but* with using repetitive sentence structure. Please note, for instance, that you really, really aren't supposed to start a sentence with a conjunction because the whole point of a conjunction is to link two items ...


2

For my editing markup I prefer a style that does not overlap and interfere with what might be part of the text I am editing. Since square brackets indicate comments or amendments in quotes in some editing styles, e.g. Rogers found in his study that "some [apples] are tasty". or destroyed text when transcribing manuscripts, I do not use them for ...


2

Similar to Dale, I'd use square brackets and color the word magenta. The magenta is a crossover from my design job, where anything in magenta is placeholder text. Magenta in a writing context would immediately signal to me "This item needs to be changed or replaced in some fashion."


2

When I'm writing, I simply mark the word for later review. How I mark it depends on my writing tool: highlight by changing the background or foreground color, insert a note or comment, wrap in [square brackets], some other way.


2

There isn't a standard syntax for this. I've had the same experience in my own writing, and have even seen a need for formal ambiguity in written text, such as a sci-fi "translation" from an alien language. The practice I use is parenthesis around the questionable content, which allows for a phrase to be inserted instead of just a single word.


1

1) If the ? is for yourself, then use two in row, which would never show up in regular text. That way you can search for them before submitting. 2) If the ? is for the reader, then I'd say never ever do that. It's the writer's job to find the right word or phrase! You don't put a placeholder there with "punctuation" to indicate that it's not right. ...


1

In addition to the other good answers, "but ..." is a negation or restriction of the thing or condition it refers to. It "takes away" from it. It also breaks the flow of thought/action (which is fine when it's on purpose.) Many people use this in speech and writing all the time as a matter of habit, even when it's not really necessary or appropriate. A lot ...


1

You asked What can I use instead of “but” and “however”? Without further ado, here are the possibilities. OTOH, on the contrary, otherwise, yet, even though, though ... still, rather, unexpectedly, despite, in spite of, ... He is a good hire. I love his honesty, but his honesty could lead us into trouble. We should hire him. I love his ...


1

Like Chris I don't see a problem and would only have deleted the first "but" in the second text snippet. You must understand that "but" is something like the 23rd most frequent word in English (http://www.wordfrequency.info/free.asp?s=y). It would be uncommon, if it did not appear often. If you want, you can use this online service to calculate word ...


1

Maybe you can use a metaphor? For X, the fuel that keeps me going. (Of course, something less cliched than that.) Metaphors can make a quote more eloquent without sounding too cheesy. Once I compared my relationship with a girl with a ghost hunt. And she actually cried (of joy, I think).


1

The first question that you need to ask yourself is where is your personal statement going to be sent to. Is it a native English speaking place or not? Now, using certain phrases like "it would get me closer towards my desired career" should not be a problem. However, when you explicitly talk about idioms, in general sense, they should be avoided. However, ...


1

Perhaps Adapted by ..... from an oral history of ..... translated from the German by ..... Your contribution has been to convert from one genre (an oral recount) to another (a printed text). In many ways this is comparable to turning a book into a screenplay where "adaptation" is the term used to indicate that the work is not "original".


1

Some of the websites mentioned here can help you to find one word for a complete sentence or a phrase. Please have a look at them : 1) http://www.vedicaptitude.com/?page_id=87 2) http://targetstudy.com/one-word-substitution/ and more...


1

"This nonsense was enough! It was time to move on."



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible