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5

Write "ha ha" if you want those words spoken, but not for laughter. Vera rolled her eyes. "Ha ha. Very funny." Actual laughter is a nonverbal sound and is better described. Vera's eyes widened. "You mean you—" A roar of laughter escaped her mouth. Tears streamed down her cheeks, and her body shook. I wouldn't normally spell it out, just ...


2

It's fine to write whatever you want. Go for it and see where it leads you! At this point, focus on establishing a writing habit and learning what works. If you need a guide, I highly recommend this book by the Gotham Writers' Workshop: Writing Fiction: The Practical Guide from New York's Acclaimed Creative Writing School. Also, if you're a young writer, ...


2

Your first example is the best, but I would avoid using "exclaimed" - it's generally better to stick with "said" all the time, as words like "exclaimed" tend to draw attention to themselves and away from the actual dialogue, where the focus should be. I would recommend: Stu laughed and said "So the bug turns into the robot." or simply: Stu laughed. "So ...


1

I don't think soften is quite the right word for what these kinds of words do, nor is filler. I think of them as signal words. They indicate to the reader what direction the text is about to take. They are like the curve signs on the highway. The signs don't make the road curve. In this sense they don't add anything. But they alert the driver/reader that a ...



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