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When writing in first person limited view you are basically writing in the voice of the character. So you should make what they say authentic. Therefore in the right circumstances this is perfectly acceptable. My advice would be to leave it in and write the story that way. Then when it is done you can get a feel for if it "works" in that context. I have ...


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If you write a literary text, vary your words. If you write an academic text, stick to the terminology and repeat it consistently (because very likely a word perceived by the lay public to be synonymous has a fundamentally different meaning to an expert).


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For the most part an author should try to conform to grammatical conventions as that makes it easier for people to read. However, this isn't a set in stone rule. You are free to violate "proper" grammatical conventions in both first-person and third-person narratives. It is best if you have a decent grasp of the conventions you violate—that knowledge ...


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In general writing, it is good to vary wording to avoid sounding repetitious. "I drove my car to the car lot where the car salesman sold me a new car." That sounds very awkward, almost silly, because of the repeated use of the same word. If I wanted to express that idea, I'd be much more likely to write, perhaps, "I drove my car to the auto dealer where the ...


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You could try "in a trance": trance: a half-conscious state, seemingly between sleeping and waking, in which ability to function voluntarily may be suspended.


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Sure. There's a very famous book: Bartlett's Familiar Quotations. e.g. http://www.amazon.com/Bartletts-Familiar-Quotations-Geoffrey-OBrien/dp/0316017590/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430161531&sr=8-1&keywords=bartlets+familiar+quotations I've seen quite a few websites of clever quips and quotes. For example, brainyquote.com, quotationspage.com, etc. ...



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