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have you ever read the series of unfortunate events by lemony snicket? in those books, the author uses an abundance of long and complicated words that many children wont understand, however, he explains many of them with examples relating to the story. your choice of vocabulary depends a lot on your targeted audience. if you are writing for your own age ...


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Write for your audience plus a little. If you're writing a book for five-year-olds, you don't want to use "sesquipedalian," but there's nothing wrong with "lengthy." Part of how we expand our vocabularies is by seeing new words in context (and looking them up if we have to). I remember learning guerdon (a reward or gift) and gravid (pregnant) from Anne ...


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Prose should slide off your fingers like warm butter. If your brain screams "discombobulated" at you, you don't have to ignore it because it's a big word. There is of course a limit based on your working vocabulary and the genre. Too many big words is snooty. I became a much better writer when I stopped using a thesaurus. My dictionary primarily gets used ...



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