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7

Serve the plot. I actually don't mind having a 10:1 ratio if the one scene packs a real punch. I wouldn't arbitrarily make half your scenes the other POV if it doesn't do anything to advance or improve your story. Don't fix what ain't broken.


7

You have to identify them somehow. Use adjectives. The tall man vs. the short man The older man vs. the younger man The long-haired man vs. the man with the thistle-down hair The carpenter vs. the electrician The French man vs. the German man It may get repetitive to say "her hands rested on the carpenter's shoulders, just they way they rested on the ...


7

Everything is about him. The other characters talk about him, plot about him, worry about him, try to contact him. Everything is about what he's doing or where he's going and with whom. Scenes where he isn't there detail the effect his actions or words had on the other characters. If it's his story, then tell his story. The TV show Person of Interest is ...


5

I agree with Lauren's answer; there's no sense in "balancing" things for the sake of one scene. There are a few ways I can see to handle this: You can encapsulate narrators to keep a single viewpoint, sorta. I have an example from a friend named Joe, although I wasn't around when Phil told me about it. Phil says: "In response to my question, Joe looked up ...


4

My suggestion would be almost the polar opposite of Stephan's; I think you ought to try switching back to Nicene/Cherry's viewpoint, at least temporarily, very soon after she's found by Shadow. While in her viewpoint, make sure to have Shadow address her as "Cherry", while consistently using her real name in narrative and any internal thoughts. Done right, ...


4

I also have multiple POVs in the story I'm currently working on, each mini-chapter switching between main characters and supporting ones, and the way I try to convey who the protagonist is is by making her related to all the conflicts that take place, whether her role in each conflict is central or minor. Of course the main story-line is hers, but when I ...


3

A few possibilities: Tag Nicene with an utterly distinctive physical feature. When Shadow observes that physical feature, readers will know that it is Nicene. Give Nicene some tag phrase, and have Cherry use the phrase. Write an earlier scene in Nicene's POV, where she introduces herself to someone as Cherry. In the scenes from Shadow's POV, introduce a ...


3

Here is a problem I run into regularly as a short story writer. Sometimes I don't ever plan to give someone a name. Particularly if they are going to be disposed of in some fashion not warranting the effort of naming them. Name them by what they are wearing, i.e. a mugger in a red jacket becomes Red Jacket for the sake of the internal dialog of my main ...


2

These are tightly connected. POV (Point of View) tells about the person, "through whose eyes we look". "Perspective" is the name for that style of view. An autobiography will be written from the author's POV, in 1st person perspective - or from POV of some protagonist. A guide will be written in 2nd person, from the reader's POV. 3rd person will be just 3rd ...


2

A classic method of uniting multiple POVs is to have characters tell what happened to them (in first person) for a whole chapter. Usually they are telling their story to the main character. Example: Canterbury Tales, Frankenstein, Arabian Nights. However, a complex story can have more than one protagonist, and might not have one MAIN protagonist. (Or if ...


1

I strongly disagree with SF's answer. 1) There is fictional 2nd person narrative. It's rare, but it exists. An example is given on the Wikipedia page to 2nd person narrative: You are not the kind of guy who would be at a place like this at this time of the morning. But here you are, and you cannot say that the terrain is entirely unfamiliar, although ...


1

What you need is a tell. Give Nicene some clear, identifying characteristic. She has purple hair; she doesn't let anybody touch her; she refers to any sort of weapon as a "thingamabob"; whatever. Then, whenever it is you want the reader to understand who she is, you just let her "tell" show: "I'm Cherry," the woman said. She wasn't looking him in the ...


1

There are many stories where characters take on false names. In the dialogue, this person goes by the fake name. In the narrative (the part of the text not directly quoted from the speech of the characters) the person goes by the true name. No confusion for the reader about who this person is, because the true name always stays the same. "Hello, my name ...


1

My first instinct would be to abstain from writing from Cherry's perspective until her identity is revealed, thereby making her more of a mystery character. Since Nicene is the protagonist, however, that probably won't work, unless you have a second protagonist to focus on during that time. I recommend using the name Cherry when writing from her ...


1

One's disadvantages are another's advantages. Immersion - First person is the most immersive of perspectives, even more so than the rare, "elusive" second person (which is specifically aimed at maximizing immersion). You live the adventures of the protagonist through his own eyes. Second-person narration is still someone telling me to do something or see ...


1

I think one of the benefits of writing in the first person is that you are never wrong. In that, all the information that spills into the story is through one person's vision, his brain. So he may interpret events in a twisted way, or may get his facts wrong, or choose not to address backgrounds or facts at all. It's his choice. In other words the ...


1

If you need the character's thoughts but want only action in the first part, there is no reason not to use 3rd person limited. It allows both pure action without thought and then action accompanied by thought. 3rd person limited does not limit you to only thought or only action; it can do both. Example: John picked up the book. He read it. He turned ...



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