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11

You really should not go by Dickens. There are trends and fashions in writing, and what was en vogue two hundred years ago is not necessarily the best model for commercially successful writing today. If I look at contemporary writing, the predominant viewpoint changes with the category. More "high browed", literary fiction is often written in third person ...


9

Boy does this sound familiar! I struggled for a year trying to coloquialize my YA characters. Every week, I would bring a new sample to my writing group. It became a standing joke, guess how old my POV characters is! The group's conscensus never got within a decade of my targetted age. Then I received the suggestion which I will share with you now... ...


3

This is an interesting and thought provoking question: "How do I write as an 18 year-old, non-native speaker would write?" And assume I am not one. I found this site looking for tips on my iphone and I am not in a habit of writing on internet threads to people I've never met, so I apologize in advance for etiquette faux-pas. 2 words: computational ...


3

You are allowed to have the prologue narrated by a different character as long as it is absolutely clear who the narrator is. You do not have to change the whole book. In fact, every chapter can be a different viewpoint narrator; George R.R. Martin does this throughout his Song of Ice and Fire books. You can also have the prologue written in third person ...


3

I would have thought that alienation and insanity are much better done using the first person than the third: you see what the character is thinking and feeling. The reader can be the judge of what is rational and what isn't, given the same information the character has. It doesn't mean the character is right. It doesn't mean the reader is right. Tension can ...


2

I know third person gives me more power over emotions but that would be limited to just one character. No. With third person omniscient narrator freely switching the followed character, you can easily flip between the two. Such switches are not nearly as freely available with first person, where you must follow one character for a full section. It boils ...


1

Well, I couldn't think of a book, but here is a pretty good web-page: http://www.writersworkshop.co.uk/PointsofViewinFiction.html I'm not the most experienced of writers, of course, but from my limited understanding I would say that POVs are a rather simple concept to grasp. The hard part is choosing which one you prefer to use in your writing style or in ...


1

First, lemme say i like Henry Taylor's answer. Hmm. Obviously, you're going to attribute more-sophisticated words to more-sophisticated people. It's not too difficult to tell when someone drops an "SAT word" on you. Your ear's a good judge. Try occasionally running a choice word of dialogue through a Synonym list. Then it's just a matter of consistently ...



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