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41

Because God does not have a story arc. If story is the conflict between desire and what stands in the way of the fulfilment of that desire, God cannot have a story arc because nothing can frustrate the desires of God. There are, of course, stories about gods. But those gods are really supermen. They have limits. They have desires. And they have forces that ...


22

As a counter-point to mbakeranalecta's answer: God can have a story arc albeit one with an obvious victor. For example: the Christian God Yahweh takes human form (with the name Jesus) in the books Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Since he is omnipotent there is no evenly matched opponent however there is an introduction, a goal, a journey, build up, a climax, ...


9

There are plenty of SFF stories which deal with deities. There's an entire Forgotten Realms (D&D) series about gods being forced to take mortal avatars and walk the earth. The Belgariad pentology by David and Leigh Eddings (and less so the sequel pentology, the Malloreon) heavily features deities as significant secondary characters. Rick Riordan writes ...


6

If you mean a singular God as prime mover, it's been done, usually as a gag rather than seriously. (For example, the grad student who is getting a failing grade on his create-a-planet lab assignment; personally I'm particularly fond of Stanislaw Lem's treatment of that in The Star Diaries where it's a matter of incompetent committee work.) If you mean one ...


2

The lack of involvement of a God in Science Fiction (as opposed to, say, epic poetry) is really a bit of historical trivia--God was simply a less popular character in the times in which Science Fiction was written. This phenomenon isn't unique to Science Fiction--not many very popular works have been written in the past few centuries with a benevolent, ...


2

I have read several stories like this. In one, humans of the future are able to use sci-fi tech to "read" any moment in the past, and use this to bring back the consciousness of those who have died. The Utopian society they returned to was, effectively, heaven. Mankind is indeed still central in this novel, but it brings about another concept for god: ...


1

The answer lies in our ability to define 'God'. Note that while we talk of God, we are personifying an all-pervading aspect; and sometimes the language in which we write or speak becomes insufficient to define 'Him' [note that even in this case, 'Him' indicates that I am referring to 'God' as a male character]. So what is this aspect called 'God'? Ancient ...



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