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18

If you are one of those rare people who can write, straight through, without any major refactorings or changes of direction along the way, more power to you. But for many people, and IMO any long-running project, source control is a major benefit. Here are some of the reasons: When you realize the path you're going down is a bad idea, you can roll back ...


7

The first scenario is check pointing to safe guard against those moments (and I've had them) where you come to realize a section of the document is missing. This happened when accidentally, without me noticing, as well as when one of my kids happened to hit the keyboard and I had a section of text selected. The other use though is before I'm going to rework ...


3

There is no advantage. Most people in this forum are from a technical background, so they automatically look for technical solutions. You don't write a book how you write code. When writing code, you dig in, change a line here, add a function there. This can break the whole system, which is why you have version control and testing and continuous ...


2

I can think of one reason: If you have a co-writer, it gives you the confidence to revert to a previous form if you don't like their writing. Or combine conflicts if both of you are writing the same section. This is the original purpose of version control in programming. As I've said in a comment, very often it's best to rewrite back to a previous draft ...


1

I write when I can. (Full-time job, family, house, church, etc. takes up most of my time.) Currently working on a book series with a complicated plot, so I often don't write linearly. (Heck, the plot's not even linear!) Once or twice per week I save under a new version number. It's been invaluable, because I've often cut a section (to paste elsewhere), ...



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