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1) Character drives plot. Go back to your character sheets, or cook up a few secondaries, and see what their backstories tell you. I've seen J. Michael Straczynski credited with: Conflict is made up of three things: What does your character want? What will they do to get it? What will someone do to stop them? So look into the backstories of your ...


4

I love villains, so this is difficult. What I love about them is their brazen disregard for convention—moral, ethical, political, etc. They represent a freedom that the hero doesn't have. The hero is constrained by some rule or code while the villain runs free. This freedom allows the villain to evolve in ways that inspire our imagination. We wonder, how ...


3

On the flip side, let me comment that one thing I really dislike in many works of fiction is when we are told that someone is a villian, but he never actually does anything evil. To take a well-known book as an example: Consider "The Picture of Dorian Gray". The whole point of the book is that Dorian Gray is a horribly evil person who nevertheless does not ...


3

The villains I absolutely hate are selfish and self-serving, but they are also cowards. This may not be blatantly obvious when they have power to wield, because they hide behind it. If they stripped of it, however, they're reduced to a sniveling heap on the floor, begging the hero for clemency or mercy and betraying everyone and everything they can so they ...


3

A villain you want to take down is, at his/her core, someone who does not care about the suffering of others. An evil wizard who wants to murder every witch or wizard who isn't a "pureblood," regardless of how skilled or what the person has done. A plutocrat who became rich by destroying businesses, and then dismisses people who don't pay income taxes as ...



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