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Alright, here I go: Don't put "englishness" in every sentence (i know you won't) Maybe you could put it in italic. (I personally would put because is foreign) If you are worried about the non-speakers of english, put a note with the meaning, but just if is a difficult word or expression. (A lot of notes distract the readers)


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I was taught to handle foreign languages (and this would include pidgins) as grace notes in the prose and dialog: there's enough there to remind the reader that characters are speaking a language other than English, but not so much to hinder the reader's progress. So once you've made it clear that the characters are speaking the pidgin, most of the dialog ...


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As an alternative to footnotes, you could just immediately translate the first few statements containing a new pidgin word, perhaps putting the translation in italics. For (an extremely made-up) example: "Jah, got might owie in me gulliver", said Collins. God, my head really hurts. Used sparingly, this might serve as a less intrusive way of expanding the ...


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Personally I don't think you need to make the words italics, if you introduce a word that isn't part of the reader's vocabulary, and give them enough clues to understand what it is, then they will pick it up. So for instance, if you had a sentence that said - 'Do you want to come to my lattie for supper' and later maybe said '...its in my lattie' people ...


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A pidgin by its nature could theoretically form from English mixed with the language you are writing in so constructing such artificial pidgin seems to be a good solution. Just abandon grammar of your language and mix it with (commonly known) words from English and roman languages. Translators in such situations sometimes do mix languages close related to ...



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