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Dittos to Cary C. I'd add that if words in a name are being used as common words and the meanings of those words are relevant, I'd probably translate, while if they are just sounds, I'd transliterate. To use a Roman alphabet example for simplicity: Suppose I was writing a history book and wanted to mention the German leader, Friedrich der Gro├če. I would ...


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My rule of thumb is not to translate proper nouns unless the translation is already in common use in the target language. For example, it's fine to call Tolstoy's book to "War and Peace" since everyone knows it by that title, but if I started referring to Rio de Janeiro as January River, people would be confused. Applying this to your case, use a common ...


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I've never translated anything longer than a paragraph, but I have had to produce extended pieces of writing in a consistent style. Here are my suggestions: Rather than starting at the beginning of the original and steadily translating page by page until you reach the end, do the translation out of sequence. E.g. if the original has twenty chapters, ...


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There's never anything wrong with breaking convention if there's a purpose and if you are precise. However, on that note, there is an enormous volume of research that has been done on translation. Linguists have created very clear styles and people are quite accustomed to them. If you did create a new style, it would beget the question as to whether the ...



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