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9

Rules? No, not beyond any that your publisher or editor might have. But one factor to consider is that, assuming you're not publishing in a specialized or foreign market, your readers probably won't know how to pronounce the words in a different alphabet -- you can't sound things out if you don't know the pronunciation rules. This means that the words you ...


6

Translation is an art, not a science, and some translations strive more for word-for-word accuracy, others for better capturing the overall experience of the original. In my experience, the approach you take should be matched to your intended audience. When the translation is aimed more at an academic or a scholarly audience, they tend to demand ...


5

My instinct is to preserve as much of the original rhythm and flow as possible, but to make it sound readable to a native ear. In both your examples, the original uses short, punchy sentences, which is a particular quirk of the writer's style. Smoothing them out by combining them, to my ear, quite literally loses something in translation. Sometimes it's ...


2

Outside of scholarly of scholarly work the norm would be to transliterate. Now I am all for violating norms, but it is riskier, more work and you have to know what you are doing. if you can pull it off It would be praiseworthy, but it is not appropriate to all situations, particularly in that violating norms draws attention so one question is do you want to ...


2

Invert the sentence to parse it. The worker first must engage the wedge for separating connector A and connector B. In that sentence, "the wedge for separating" becomes an adjective phrase. That means there's a wedge for separating but there's also a wedge for cutting, meaning it's another of the same object but it does a different task. I don't ...


2

That would depend on why the section was untranslated. If the "quoting author" merely choose not to translate the section, say, out of laziness, assuming "the audience will understand it" or he judged some wording conveys the idea better than a translation would, or the quote was a poem and the translation would break the rhymes - essentially, if the reason ...


1

I understand What's reasoning, but I would say the opposite: I'd say that if you're translating the language, you should follow the conventions of the target language. To take a similar example: in the U.S. we use a period to separate whole numbers from fractions and commas to separate groups of digits, like "1,234.56". But in many countries they do the ...


1

I believe this can work fine in translation of non-literary, standardized documents, e.g. technical documentation, medical reports, and the like. The more both format and language (terms) are standardized, the better this will work. Preparation You must write with automatic translation in mind. Use the same words and phrases always with the same meaning ...


1

In books that go through multiple editions, you will sometimes see "preface to the first edition", "preface to the second edition", etc. In other words, there is precedent for not editing it out but instead adding to it, even if -- for all we know -- the stuff people helped with in the first edition has since been removed. Your original novel had help from ...


1

Use the Iranian address format If your story takes place in Iran, your characters eat Iranian food, watch Iranian tv, and receive letters with an Iranian address. It is what gives your story a sense of place, it is part of the setting. Only if you want to transfer the whole story to another country (as sometimes happens, for example when movies get remade ...



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