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12

The European Union has a detailed guide to Writing for Translation (pdf). Some of the key points they cover: Use explanatory headings and summaries, and limit each paragraph to one idea Make sentence structure unambiguous Avoid long sentences with a complicated structure Use vertical lists Avoid empty verbs and ‘nominalisation disease’ Use the active ...


8

Let me add some tips regarding computer translation, although I believe Rob Hoare's answer is great: Write the original in a 'popular' language for the simple reason that those are most tested and most optimized. If for example you will be using Google Translate then it's mostly like the the node distance to any language is smallest from English (or maybe ...


5

The following options may be helpful for avoiding overuse of specific noun-adjective pairs: Replace the noun with another noun which has a similar relationship to the adjective. This is the simplest and most obvious method. In place of "jet-black" you could, e.g., use "coal-black" (I actually had to look up the definition of "jet" and learned it was ...


4

You can't guarantee the reader will make sense of your translated text without a layer of human intervention. If anything, you should have two: one who is an expert in the field, to make sure content wasn't lost in translation, and one to read for native-language coherence. Translating text is not like changing fonts. You must have a human read it at some ...


3

The book's copyright page will identify who owns the copyright to the material. This will typically be the author, or the publisher, or both. Contact the copyright owner and negotiate to obtain the rights. If you need more than that, see The Copyright Handbook, which has a chapter on how to obtain copyright permissions.


3

The magazine is most interested in the legal situation. So you should mention if the offeror (probably your friend) holds all necessary rights of the translation (made by you). Also it should be clear that the story is not licensed in its original version in a way that would make it impossible for the magazine to publish it (like: a different publisher ...


3

I'd go by the following guidelines: One, if the company has an "English version" of its name that could at all be called "well known", I would use it. If you call a car company the "Modern Era Company", that might be a perfectly good and valid translation of the name. But everybody else in the English-speaking world calls it Hyundai, and it will just be ...


2

The dense pine forest was stained black as pitch (I don't know if you're aware, but "pitch" actually means "pine tar." It's pine sap cooked down until it's thick enough to spread like peanut butter. So if you're talking about a dark pine forest, pitch-black makes the most literal sense.) Go for the emotion in it: I also recalled one night that the ...


2

Instead of a looking for a single expression, consider the cases individually. If you can show us that it's black (pitch- or otherwise), you won't need to tell us. Consider: Pine resin cloaked the dense forest in darkness... I also recalled one moonless1 night Sometimes you really do just need an adjective, such as "pitch-black eyes". That's ...


2

In my opinion as a computer technician, this is impossible at least outside the strictly technical language... And, even so, I don't think it's something you can expect to be error free. Google translator is far from accurate, at least from what I see when interacting with people that depends on it to speak in English. It can translate something in an ...


2

In general, for a popular work it is bad style to include quotes in a foreign language. Most of your readers will not understand them. An old enough flavor of English is a "foreign language" for all practical purposes. Modern readers can struggle through Shakespeare, but much before that and I'd translate. If you were writing a scholarly work, or a work ...


1

Every morning I read the largest national newspaper in Germany. I just retrieved it from the waste paper collection and opened the business and economics section. There is an article about mismanagement in European banks. What they do is: give the original name of the company and its official acronym in parenthesis when the company is mentioned for the ...


1

It depends on the context - audience and what information you are relaying. If you are informing an English audience who will do business in Sweden, then it's probably best to include the Swedish name and also the English translation. Ask yourself - Who is my audience? - What information am I relaying? - How do I anticipate the audience will use this ...


1

I have no experience in this field, but I cannot imagine that the editing process would be different. If I understand this correctly, then your main concern is that the edited version of the translation could diverge too much from the original work. That's not nice, that's true, and people reading both version will recognize that, maybe even getting upset ...


1

I've found Translation Table for LibreOffice this is not an advanced tool but for little works is useful: Translation Table creates a two column table, where in the first column you get the source text segmented by sentence, each sentence in a cell, and in the second column you can put your translated sentences, each one in opposite cells to the ...


1

I'm also Spanish and when I read a translated book, let's say Harry Potter (his nationality doesn't affect to the plot), I don't care if he's British or wherever. If you wrote the story in the way you think is the best, I don't think you should change it; even more when you say it (the nationality) doesn't affect.


1

As a reader I would tend to argue for direct translation: It gives a window into something I don't know. As a writer I would argue for retelling: who wants to tell the exact same story again? In either case I would make it clear which you did, so that speakers of both languages can decide If they want to read both.


1

The best translations I've seen (Dante's Commedia, Beowulf) have the original and the translation together. That way you can read what the sense of the text is, but if you want, you have the original for check (or so you can translate it yourself if you can). If the quoted verse improves yours, by all means include it.


1

It's 3 years since the question was posted, but I just stumbled across it. I read something by Martin Luther many years ago where he discussed his efforts to translate the Bible into German. He said that he first made a word-for-word translation. Then he made a free translation that he felt conveyed the sense of the original. Then he took the two ...


1

USA New York: Oxford University Press Reissue edition. Original edition 1998. Why delete that? No one cares if that book is an unchanged reissue. You only tell the reader if the book you quote from is a different editon (e.g. 2nd ed.), because that means that there have been changes to the text, and therefore it is important to identify the correct ...



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