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9

I've read a lot of novels in my life and I cannot remember one, that uses bold for emphasizing. But maybe that's just my memory problem. I prefer italic, but honestly, that is a matter of taste and totally up to the writer. I prefer italic words, because they stand out without shouting at the reader. One bold word on a page is attracting the eye. It's ...


7

The disclaimer has an interesting history, and tvtropes has an expanded version of it: This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places and incidents either are products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental. It does not specifically ...


7

I think the ellipses are fine, but I agree with the comment from the original site that italics would work as well. But neither one really shows a question, to my reading. If you mean for someone to be emphasizing 'different', I'd use italics. "He's a different sort of person. Not like the others at all." If you mean for someone to be using ...


6

I am reminded of the anecdote about Dustin Hoffman torturing himself for Marathon Man because he was a "Method" actor, so he'd look as tortured as his character. Lawrence Olivier looked at him and said, "My dear boy, that's why they call it acting." Whenever we write, unless we're writing an autobiography, we are always putting ourselves into someone ...


6

...it looks rude? I have never heard of italics being called "rude." Your friend is full of it. Both your examples are perfect exactly as they are. The first one is a brief interior monologue, set off by formatting. The second uses italics for emphasis. Single quotes (or single inverted commas) are, as you correctly stated, used for nested quoted material ...


5

Place emphasis on uncomfortable things. Depending on the level of realism you're aiming at, you might want to imagine some upsetting situations that "could" happen, and let the people "see" them. Also, make sure to give a long space to angsty thoughts, and only a fleeting space to happy thoughts or situations. If you're ever going to talk from the ...


4

Normally this kind of statement would appear by itself at the beginning of your material. With a print magazine, there are a couple of options. One option would be to place it as small print in a footer on the cover. Another would be to place it by itself in regular print on the very first page inside the cover. The latter would probably be the best option. ...


4

On point #1, your inversion is only valid if you do as suggested in above answers OR if you removed the "it was". e.g. Only when I decided to confront the problem and call the people involved was I able to move towards a solution. But you really need to minimise the gap between 'when' and 'was I'. One way to do this would be to remove superfluous verbs ...


4

I agree with John here: too much telling, not enough showing. I'd also argue that this piece of writing suffers from a common problem whereby you think that "hiding" a piece of information i.e. "I'm gay" leads to a bigger pay off when it's revealed, like an "Ah-ha!" or "Ta-da!" moment. It normally doesn't. This sort of withholding of information from the ...


4

I have to disagree with Kate. The "I'm gay" is a nice twist, but it does change nothing. If you posted this as a blog post I wouldn't have reached the end. Show us how the people are, what happened, do not tell it. The uncle is a "gruff man". Woohoo, is he? Says who? You? Who cares? And what means "gruff" anyway? If I open the door and a gruff man stands ...


3

Give each collaborator free rein to edit any part of the story for tone. After a round or two of that, you won't be able to tell who wrote what. If it's a multiple POV story, you can give each POV to one collaborator to edit for tone. That way, if tone varies, it gives each character a distinct voice.


3

It is gentle humor. The fact that the tone is lighter-hearted does NOT detract at all. What DOES detract is the lengthiness. If the passage above were half the length that it is now, it would get the point across quite effectively. The recursive business, about the Oracle of Oracles becomes belabored when so drawn out. Otherwise, it is a good way of ...


3

Specificity can be helpful. Just as you can characterize the protagonist by telling us that he shuffled into the courtroom in his flame-colored flip flops, you can show the characters' preferences and habits (and maybe their economic situation) through their choices of brands, locations, and their reactions to well-known landmarks. The character who grabs a ...


3

I like it. If there hadn't been the twist, I would definitely have said that it went on too long, with too much telling. The comment I was building was something along the lines of 'instead of having the character anticipate all that, just SHOW us it all happening'. But the "I'm gay" changed everything. It still wouldn't break my heart to see you trim it ...


2

The idea is great, and you obviously have a very clear image of your character and his environment, but you're trying to give it all to the reader in one lump. There is so much description and detail that it slows the pace and makes the piece ponderous. This is a situation of near panic; the narrative should reflect that. Panic doesn't dwell; it's scattered ...


2

I agree with Kate's comments, with minor exceptions: Paragraphs 3 and 4 ("Lance went over..." and "But even Susan") seem more "on the nose" than desirable; for example, the bald statement "Susan couldn’t deny that there was nothing left of the love they had once shared." Perhaps flash back, for a paragraph, to some loud dialogue between them? A few minor ...


2

If you're creating this for a Quark tutorial, it's reasonable to assume that it will most frequently (if not always) be seen in the context of "someone learning Quark" rather than "accidentally winds up on newsstand or coffee table." So I don't think you need to put it on the cover. If you are parodying a magazine, then a magazine has a colophon, which is a ...


2

Personally, I wouldn't use punctuation to indicate the tone change at all. Punctuation marks are like modifiers - use them too often and they loose their effect. This is commonly acknowledged with the exclamation point especially, but holds true for many and perhaps all punctuation marks, with the possible exception of the period and quote marks during ...


2

I just finished watching the 1976 film Network about a fictitious television network, but that mentions the other real networks (such as ABC) and real companies (e.g. Disney, IBM, AT&T, Union Carbide). The disclaimer at the end of the film refers to firms: The events, characters and firms depicted in the photoplay are ficticious. Any similarity to ...


2

It does impact how you write, and possibly your ability to write, but not always in a predictable or positive sense. At first it might seem that it's easier to write about a particular emotion when you're experiencing that emotion. Not necessarily. Let's assume that you can somehow work yourself into that emotional state without it seeming strained or ...


2

I guess the correct question would be "does having your text affected by your mood is good or bad"? I have no doubt that what the author is feeling affects the way he writes, just as anybody in any kind of job will be affected in their performance by the way they are feeling. It's normal to a certain point. The problem is that, what you feel, might affect ...


2

A couple of the other answers made me look at your paragraph again. I can't tell for sure which end of the bullying "you" were on (if it is actually about you). I deduce that you were bullied, but, especially in a conclusion, the reader shouldn't have to deduce anything. It should be laid out as a summation of what has already been presented, or reinforce ...


2

You have a few problems here. One is basic command of grammar. You have run-on sentences, weird dialogue attributes, and just outright incorrect sentence structure. You need a proofreader before anything else. The other, as the publisher pointed out, is that you go back and forth from "artificially antique and formal" (Oh, mighty buzzard, please do not ...


1

I would say yes. I found a short articles for you to puruse at your lesure: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/a-positive-mood-allows-your-brain-to-think-more-creatively.html I have noticed when writing poetry or music, I tend to do my most prolific work when I am upset. I write down everything I can and use that mood as fuel. When ...


1

To help with the tone, consider using shorter, more concise sentences. To gain punch, you can simplify your sentence structures,eliminate some abstract words ("exacerbates", "denial"), and put your key words at the end of each sentence. To gain force at the end, you might consier reoranizing the last sentence to connect tightly the causes and effects. ...


1

If you want to include fictitious businesses, try: All characters and corporations or establishments appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. The rest of the statement is excellent, only a small addition is needed to include the businesses.


1

Focus on descriptions. Describe the setting vividly so that the reader feels like they're there. If you were in a psychiatric ward at night, what would you be scared of? Try and put those things into your novel. Humans are naturally fearful and cautious creatures. You can easily prey upon those natural fears to make the novel seem dark. If you'd really like ...



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