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I recently watch 7 editors choose stories for anthologies. They had read all of the stories a month or two earlier, and were now considering them in front of a live audience. Every now and then, an editor would pick up a manuscript from the pile, read the title out loud to the audience, and say, "I have no memory of this. Give me a minute..." Then they'd ...


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When I am Writing my titles I make a list of what I think is most important about the story. Then what I do is I reread parts of it. then I brainstorm and write words that come to me, about and from the book. I will read them then try and make a something that sums up the book. For instance, I wrote a story about a well that holds all the memories of the ...


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1) What I like to do is go to a book store and look at the titles in the genre I am writing in. If you do that, you will notice that books from the same genre often have titles that are similarly structured. For example, thrillers have short one or two word titles that relate to things hard, cold and dangerous. YA SF also has one word titles, but these ...


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There are two ways to approach this: marketing artistic Though they aren't necessarily mutually exclusive, an excessively obscure title might be risky in terms of the former (although, it might also help; you never know). My advice is to ignore any marketing concerns and focus on art. A title must be: indicative of the book in question (can you ...



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