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The short answer is that there is no right answer. The hardest word choice in any book is the handful of words that make up the title. And if I were allowed to give advice then the advice I would give is to trust in magical word angels who will eventually whisper in your ear and tell you what the title should be. But let's say that the whispering word ...


3

I have trouble coming up with titles, too! Yet titles matter. Busy agents and publishers aren't going to spend much time looking at material that appears uninteresting, and your title (in addition to your cover letter and perhaps your first few sentences/pages) is one of the few opportunities you have to catch their attention. Even if the title is changed ...


3

I don't know what a Gigaku Mask is, but I had no idea what The Stone Dance of the Chameleon was either, and that didn't prevent me to buy - and love - that book. Don't forget that the reader buys also by the cover and the resume, and that will probably give them more insight. If I had seen the picture of a Gigaku Mask, I would know it was some kind of ...


3

I'm intrigued by the title but not by the intro. The key to an effective opening paragraph, and story as a whole, is you don't want your readers to think about sentence structure and other technicalities. You want them riding the roller coaster of your characters' experiences and emotions. This intro doesn't do that for me. One, I'm not sure where I am. At ...


3

I think a title has two purposes: to get the attention of the potential reader, and to give him a clue what the story is about. Putting a foreign word or a word that is likely to be unfamiliar to most potential readers can attract attention. A natural response is, "What does that mean?", which may get them to look for more information. If the potential ...


2

It all depends on what you're aiming at with your title. The title may not be meaningful. Take Nana by Émile Zola or Old Father Goriot by Honoré de Balzac. It's merely the name of the protagonist or just a significant character. It tells nothing about the content, the story, and is too generic to indicate anything about what kind of story it is. Such a ...


2

No, sorry. I stopped reading at, "crystalline turquoise water and shiny white sand". Two adjectives per noun makes for ponderous reading. Plus, the use of "gripped" and "finally" implied tension to me, which was then contradicted by the sand and water sentence. Is she tense or is she calm? I don't mind the idea of an extra finger, but would this character ...


1

I haven't come across any specific data regarding the effect being carried over into print but I doubt it does--right now at least. Firstly, what kind of reading do people do in print? Usually it's of the attention-demanding kind--novels, textbooks--for which they've already made the mental commitment. Certain types of print material (magazines, newspapers) ...


1

No. I took a look at the Economist style guide capitals section here and found no mention of "its." A search of the Economist website turned up articles with the following titles (bold for emphasis): Multinationals: China loses its allure Kenya and its Somalis: Go back home! Turkey and its neighbours: A reset? So although the style guide ...


1

As @Lauren Ipsum said, go for clarity. Remember that there are times when you don't see the context, for instance when using a cross-reference. "See section 2.3.2, Terrestrial" is not immediately obvious to the reader. Approach this as a writer, not a mathematician. Writing section headings that make sense even when viewed in isolation, will help readers ...


1

I like your opening paragraph as a whole (i.e. not the first sentence). It does grab my attention. It takes me into the moment. You create suspense and I would love to find out what it is. However, I agree with others about "sixth finger". I am unsure what it means. More importantly, it has negative connotations. Ask yourself: why sixth finger? Or seventh ...


1

There are some ways, some better, some worse. If this story is connected to some common theme, story, legend, myth, take its name and modify it, come up with some pun based on how it twists the theme, or such. This is a better method but it may or may not always work. One universal method that always works and always produces decent results though is: ...


1

Find a key word or phrase and then start searching through Bartleby's and Shakespeare to see if any good quotes come up. Even if they don't, just looking at poetry might shake something loose.



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