Hot answers tagged

14

If you think the title is the best fit for your novel, you should keep it. There are many novels with the same name in the market, which makes it a little hard to find a novel with smaller market presence written by unknown author. Thus why, it is only a problem if the novel you're writing has the same name with another novel written by an author with more ...


4

In the US, the ISBN registrar Bowker allows changing the title. Their FAQ does not say anything about the ramifications of doing that. If you got the ISBN from someone else, ask whoever assigned the ISBN to your book. Once you assign an ISBN, your registrar will distribute the information, e.g. to Books In Print. So there my be catalogs with the old title, ...


4

In this case, there's not likely to be a problem if you give your novel the same title as a Czech essay. You're not trying to confuse anyone, and intelligent people are unlikely to be confused by it. The protection given to a title is complicated. People sometimes say "You can't protect a title," but this is not true. Some titles can be registered as ...


4

There's no real criteria for chapter titles, as with most things in writing you can do what you like. There's no reason to have them if you don't want to, either. That said, it's probably a good idea to keep them short and succinct (no longer than about six or seven words). Most authors use them to tease the reader with a vague description of what's ...


3

I cannot speak for Portugal, but in Germany, "American" (that is, US American) movies, music and books are considered to be great by default. In media, "American" is a label that signals great entertainment to German consumers, and the most popular films, tv series, books and musical recordings are "Made in America". On top of that, English is considered a ...


3

I worked in bookstores for 10 years and libraries for five. You have no idea how often someone asks for a title that seems unique, but two or even three hits come up. It's even worse when it's a single word title. I'd check and see what the other book is about. If the subject matter is too similar and its recently published, it might cause confusion. But ...


3

Titles cannot be copyrighted or trademarked. Yes, “Star Wars” is trademarked, but not because of the book or movie. It is the toys and other goods that enable the trademark. So you should go ahead and use your title.


2

If the target audience understand the meaning of the tittle, then its fine. I'm an English only speaker, but if a book was titled 'El Diablo' that would be fine because I am familiar with those two specific spanish words. Also I would probably assume that the book was set in a Spanish speaking country or has something to do with spanish speaking people. ...


2

It is not unusual for a work to have a variety of titles. The title may appear differently on the cover, title page, spine and other places. Resource Discovery and Access (RDA), the standard for Anglo-American library cataloging, provides instructions for dealing with each of these when cataloging a work. See ...


2

For fiction, you should be concerned with painting the picture as vivid as possible in the minds of your reader. So no, your chapter titles should not be deep. Chapter titles may be one of these things A summary of the chapter in a word or two A punchline or punch word The geographic setting of the subplot in that chapter You risk losing your reader ...


2

Yes! You can do this most easily with Adwords to see which title performs better. Tim Ferris did this when deciding which title to use for "The Four Hour Work Week". Source: http://boingboing.net/2010/10/25/howto-use-google-adw.html This is a cost-effective channel with very clear definitions of success (e.g. which title got more clicks). You can also do ...


2

Recommendations will be subjective Unlike books, chapters do not need titles in the first place. To have them can be more convenient, for the same reason why human beings have names, not numbers. Additionally, I argue that titles can unfold nicely if they fit their context. They will never enhance the chapter itself, but they are an opportunity to highlight ...


2

1) What I like to do is go to a book store and look at the titles in the genre I am writing in. If you do that, you will notice that books from the same genre often have titles that are similarly structured. For example, thrillers have short one or two word titles that relate to things hard, cold and dangerous. YA SF also has one word titles, but these ...


1

I recently watch 7 editors choose stories for anthologies. They had read all of the stories a month or two earlier, and were now considering them in front of a live audience. Every now and then, an editor would pick up a manuscript from the pile, read the title out loud to the audience, and say, "I have no memory of this. Give me a minute..." Then they'd ...


1

Many literary greats have deep chapter titles. They can be as subtly deep as you want but their main purpose is to intrigue and give hints of what may come next. My advice would be to keep them obscure enough so that the chapter content is not too obvious before you read it. Think along the lines of TV series and the individual titles they give to episodes. ...


1

Many, probably most, novels don't give names to chapters, they just number them. I presume they do this to avoid giving away plot developments. To give an extreme example, suppose you were writing a mystery novel. You probably include a number of suspects who are later shown to be innocent. But if when the reader opened the book he saw the table of contents ...


1

Of course, many fiction novels only use numbers to label the chapters. I'm sure you've considered that. Chapter titles, though, can be created in the same way as the title of a story or book. Sometimes I'll read the piece and underline words and phrases that resonate or catch my attention. Those are good candidates for titles, or they can lead to something ...


1

You might have to consult a lawyer, but from my time as a newspaper editor, I recall that (in the 1990s) BOOK TITLES WERE NOT SUBJECT TO COPYRIGHT. So long as you are not "attempting to trade upon the prestige of the earlier work by that title," (or words to that effect) you are okay. That means, in "real language," that so long as your ms. does not ...


1

The clarifier you want is "respectively." It's fine in running copy, or even as a caption, but clunks as a header. Comparison of egocentric camera against static camera and dense sensor placement, respectively For a headline, you might try emphasizing the idea that there are two comparisons with some redundancy: Comparisons of Egocentric Camera ...


1

Yes. It is not unheard of for a book to have a shortened title on the cover. The full title should be on the spine of the book though, as this is professional.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible