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5

An informal, jokey title is perfectly appropriate. This is especially true if, as I surmise, you're writing a progrmming manual of some sort. Computer science is a pretty informal field, after all. It's almost expected. The title isn't very eye-catching, but it's a common enough turn of phrase and there's nothing wrong with it, as such.


5

It's not that it's unsuitable, but the word play of "Ins and Outs" isn't very well matched with the subject of "Boolean Variables." "Ins and Outs" sounds like it's more about GPIO pins. I'd be tempted to do something like; "If This_Chapter == About_Boolean_Variables {Read}" ;)


4

I answer your question for APA. Psychological papers are very rigidly formatted, so possibly you have more leeway when following MLA, but I would suspect that the basics still apply. To answer your question, we must first understand what the purpose of the headings is. To understand that, let's take a step back and look at the paper's title. The APA Manual ...


2

I, too, am not a lawyer, so cannot give you advice. I can, however, tell you how I think I would act in your circumstances, as I understand them. My understanding of copyright protection is that it does not protect every word or line in a work; it protects only significant portions of a work. As such, I can quote a work verbatim without compensating the ...


2

It's done often enough. I can think of books and stories with titles that come from poems, Bible quotes, etc. Like Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" is a quote from Ecclesiastes, and there's a fairly well-known science fiction story called "By the Waters of Babylon", also a Bible quote. There's a story by Heinlein called "And he Built a Crooked House", which ...


2

No. I took a look at the Economist style guide capitals section here and found no mention of "its." A search of the Economist website turned up articles with the following titles (bold for emphasis): Multinationals: China loses its allure Kenya and its Somalis: Go back home! Turkey and its neighbours: A reset? So although the style guide ...


2

As far as I can tell, no. Use normal sentence case, where you capitalize the first word of a headline only. The exceptions are proper nouns, or other capitalized words listed in the style guide's section on capitals. The guide doesn't address words like "its"; The Economist has little patience with this sort of minutiae. However, as has been pointed out ...


1

Im tempted with The true and false of Boolean Variables... There is nothing !true about this. When you can't tell your true from your not-so-false The universal !false!


1

Depends on how formal or informal the technical writing is and whether the target audience is beginner's or advanced. A more specific and accurate chapter would be ideal. "Ins and Outs" is too vague.


1

Don't do it. Here's why. The copyright holder of the poem can invoke the Lanham Act to protect their work. It falls under 'unfair competition' and/or 'passing off.' "Passing off" is where they usually nail you to the wall. The title of a stand-alone book cannot be copyrighted. However, the main title of a series can be trademarked and registered. You ...


1

1) A comment like "hey, don't forget to test XYZ" gets an acknowledgement at the end. 2) I've never seen a format like this, where you actually separate the author list into two sections. I like it. Just have never seen it. 3) Bosses go at the end of the author list. In academia or government, they should be left off if they had no real involvement. But ...


1

I haven't come across any specific data regarding the effect being carried over into print but I doubt it does--right now at least. Firstly, what kind of reading do people do in print? Usually it's of the attention-demanding kind--novels, textbooks--for which they've already made the mental commitment. Certain types of print material (magazines, newspapers) ...


1

I think that we should take the readers' expectations into account when writing a short story. Giving your story an exotic title makes me expect something overly sophisticated (I know, I tend to fold quickly. Just puff out your literary chest a little, and I'll walk out of the bar rather than draw my six-shooter). I think your story's title should be ...


1

I think you should heed Eco and let your story go. Stories are like children: they don't live their lives for you. If you force them to make you happy, you destroy their spirit. If this were my story, I would chose "I could hear someone sobbing softly" as its title. The title should attract the reader. It is like the cover of a magazine, a movie poster, or ...



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