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6

An informal, jokey title is perfectly appropriate. This is especially true if, as I surmise, you're writing a progrmming manual of some sort. Computer science is a pretty informal field, after all. It's almost expected. The title isn't very eye-catching, but it's a common enough turn of phrase and there's nothing wrong with it, as such.


6

It's not that it's unsuitable, but the word play of "Ins and Outs" isn't very well matched with the subject of "Boolean Variables." "Ins and Outs" sounds like it's more about GPIO pins. I'd be tempted to do something like; "If This_Chapter == About_Boolean_Variables {Read}" ;)


5

The short answer to your general question is "no." If the subsection is titled the same as the section, then either one of them is named incorrectly or else your outline is incorrect. An outline is supposed to be like this: Title: Great Cities of the World I. American Cities A. Large Cities 1. New York, NY 2. Chicago, IL B. Historical Cities ...


4

I answer your question for APA. Psychological papers are very rigidly formatted, so possibly you have more leeway when following MLA, but I would suspect that the basics still apply. To answer your question, we must first understand what the purpose of the headings is. To understand that, let's take a step back and look at the paper's title. The APA Manual ...


4

You definitely want to avoid the kind of clash you're describing. Intuitively, the section is composed of smaller subsections, which expand on particular areas. So a clash feels like you're saying "And now, within the topic of (Topic X), let's talk about (Topic X)." Even if there's some kind of sense to it, it's confusing and should be avoided. The key to ...


3

I would use a colon rather than a dash and I would write the word 'and' instead of using a symbol. Although colons and dashes are often interchangeable, in this case the extra piece could be considered a 'title' or 'definition' of what went before. Dashes are usually used for extra information. Also, if you look at article titles (in anything I read), they ...


3

Which style do you follow? APA (from the APA Style Blog) Capitalize the first word of the title/heading and of any subtitle/subheading; Capitalize all “major” words (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns) in the title/heading, including the second part of hyphenated major words (e.g., Self-Report not Self-report); and Capitalize all ...


2

I, too, am not a lawyer, so cannot give you advice. I can, however, tell you how I think I would act in your circumstances, as I understand them. My understanding of copyright protection is that it does not protect every word or line in a work; it protects only significant portions of a work. As such, I can quote a work verbatim without compensating the ...


2

It's done often enough. I can think of books and stories with titles that come from poems, Bible quotes, etc. Like Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" is a quote from Ecclesiastes, and there's a fairly well-known science fiction story called "By the Waters of Babylon", also a Bible quote. There's a story by Heinlein called "And he Built a Crooked House", which ...


2

If this is a question of accepted style then my first stop would be whoever would be likely to receive or review or grade or publish said work. Some bodies have very clear cut ideas about how things should be presented. However if the focus here is readers then one need only consider their own expectations, memory skills, etc and the importance of the ...


2

Many publishers omit the information altogether when they post standalone short stories to KDP. The figure that Amazon's Product Details will give an estimate of the print length of the book, and that's enough of a hint. I like to let people know when my book is a short story. I include that information in the last line of my book descriptions. Something ...


2

As far as I can tell, no. Use normal sentence case, where you capitalize the first word of a headline only. The exceptions are proper nouns, or other capitalized words listed in the style guide's section on capitals. The guide doesn't address words like "its"; The Economist has little patience with this sort of minutiae. However, as has been pointed out ...


1

I would stick with the colon rather than a dash. Generally, a colon indicates that what follows is critical information, while a dash tends to imply that the following information is simply an addition and further explains what has already been stated. It's a matter of perception. As for the ampersand, I would say it depends on a few things: Does the ...


1

In school the rule of thumb for capitalizing titles was first word, last word and all important words (and almost all words were important excluding only articles prepositions and conjunctions). If we follow that rule the question is cashflow one word or two? If it is one word it gets one capital and no space, if two words it gets two capitals and a space. ...


1

For regulation Kids Are Getting Fat Eating School Lunches, But The Government Can Help These Changes In School Lunches Promote the Health of Our Children School Lunch Reform: Do It For the Children Against regulation Get the Government Out of Your Children's Food Parents Should Regulate School Lunches, Not Government Middle of the Road Who Should ...


1

If you know the gist of what your book is, which you should, try http://www.nameboy.com/ Designed for domain names, it will give a big list of synonyms and all the possible combinations. So if you enter Sword and Warrior, you'll get lots of variations. Knife Fighter, Sword Soldier, etc. Yes, a lot of it will be nonsense, but it should help get the juices ...


1

Im tempted with The true and false of Boolean Variables... There is nothing !true about this. When you can't tell your true from your not-so-false The universal !false!


1

Depends on how formal or informal the technical writing is and whether the target audience is beginner's or advanced. A more specific and accurate chapter would be ideal. "Ins and Outs" is too vague.


1

Don't do it. Here's why. The copyright holder of the poem can invoke the Lanham Act to protect their work. It falls under 'unfair competition' and/or 'passing off.' "Passing off" is where they usually nail you to the wall. The title of a stand-alone book cannot be copyrighted. However, the main title of a series can be trademarked and registered. You ...



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