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14

If you think the title is the best fit for your novel, you should keep it. There are many novels with the same name in the market, which makes it a little hard to find a novel with smaller market presence written by unknown author. Thus why, it is only a problem if the novel you're writing has the same name with another novel written by an author with more ...


5

The short answer to your general question is "no." If the subsection is titled the same as the section, then either one of them is named incorrectly or else your outline is incorrect. An outline is supposed to be like this: Title: Great Cities of the World I. American Cities A. Large Cities 1. New York, NY 2. Chicago, IL B. Historical Cities ...


4

You definitely want to avoid the kind of clash you're describing. Intuitively, the section is composed of smaller subsections, which expand on particular areas. So a clash feels like you're saying "And now, within the topic of (Topic X), let's talk about (Topic X)." Even if there's some kind of sense to it, it's confusing and should be avoided. The key to ...


4

In the US, the ISBN registrar Bowker allows changing the title. Their FAQ does not say anything about the ramifications of doing that. If you got the ISBN from someone else, ask whoever assigned the ISBN to your book. Once you assign an ISBN, your registrar will distribute the information, e.g. to Books In Print. So there my be catalogs with the old title, ...


4

In this case, there's not likely to be a problem if you give your novel the same title as a Czech essay. You're not trying to confuse anyone, and intelligent people are unlikely to be confused by it. The protection given to a title is complicated. People sometimes say "You can't protect a title," but this is not true. Some titles can be registered as ...


3

I worked in bookstores for 10 years and libraries for five. You have no idea how often someone asks for a title that seems unique, but two or even three hits come up. It's even worse when it's a single word title. I'd check and see what the other book is about. If the subject matter is too similar and its recently published, it might cause confusion. But ...


3

Titles cannot be copyrighted or trademarked. Yes, “Star Wars” is trademarked, but not because of the book or movie. It is the toys and other goods that enable the trademark. So you should go ahead and use your title.


3

I would use a colon rather than a dash and I would write the word 'and' instead of using a symbol. Although colons and dashes are often interchangeable, in this case the extra piece could be considered a 'title' or 'definition' of what went before. Dashes are usually used for extra information. Also, if you look at article titles (in anything I read), they ...


3

Which style do you follow? APA (from the APA Style Blog) Capitalize the first word of the title/heading and of any subtitle/subheading; Capitalize all “major” words (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns) in the title/heading, including the second part of hyphenated major words (e.g., Self-Report not Self-report); and Capitalize all ...


3

I cannot speak for Portugal, but in Germany, "American" (that is, US American) movies, music and books are considered to be great by default. In media, "American" is a label that signals great entertainment to German consumers, and the most popular films, tv series, books and musical recordings are "Made in America". On top of that, English is considered a ...


2

If this is a question of accepted style then my first stop would be whoever would be likely to receive or review or grade or publish said work. Some bodies have very clear cut ideas about how things should be presented. However if the focus here is readers then one need only consider their own expectations, memory skills, etc and the importance of the ...


2

Many publishers omit the information altogether when they post standalone short stories to KDP. The figure that Amazon's Product Details will give an estimate of the print length of the book, and that's enough of a hint. I like to let people know when my book is a short story. I include that information in the last line of my book descriptions. Something ...


2

If the target audience understand the meaning of the tittle, then its fine. I'm an English only speaker, but if a book was titled 'El Diablo' that would be fine because I am familiar with those two specific spanish words. Also I would probably assume that the book was set in a Spanish speaking country or has something to do with spanish speaking people. ...


1

You might have to consult a lawyer, but from my time as a newspaper editor, I recall that (in the 1990s) BOOK TITLES WERE NOT SUBJECT TO COPYRIGHT. So long as you are not "attempting to trade upon the prestige of the earlier work by that title," (or words to that effect) you are okay. That means, in "real language," that so long as your ms. does not ...


1

It is not unusual for a work to have a variety of titles. The title may appear differently on the cover, title page, spine and other places. Resource Discovery and Access (RDA), the standard for Anglo-American library cataloging, provides instructions for dealing with each of these when cataloging a work. See ...


1

The clarifier you want is "respectively." It's fine in running copy, or even as a caption, but clunks as a header. Comparison of egocentric camera against static camera and dense sensor placement, respectively For a headline, you might try emphasizing the idea that there are two comparisons with some redundancy: Comparisons of Egocentric Camera ...


1

I would stick with the colon rather than a dash. Generally, a colon indicates that what follows is critical information, while a dash tends to imply that the following information is simply an addition and further explains what has already been stated. It's a matter of perception. As for the ampersand, I would say it depends on a few things: Does the ...


1

In school the rule of thumb for capitalizing titles was first word, last word and all important words (and almost all words were important excluding only articles prepositions and conjunctions). If we follow that rule the question is cashflow one word or two? If it is one word it gets one capital and no space, if two words it gets two capitals and a space. ...



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