Hot answers tagged

14

If you think the title is the best fit for your novel, you should keep it. There are many novels with the same name in the market, which makes it a little hard to find a novel with smaller market presence written by unknown author. Thus why, it is only a problem if the novel you're writing has the same name with another novel written by an author with more ...


4

In this case, there's not likely to be a problem if you give your novel the same title as a Czech essay. You're not trying to confuse anyone, and intelligent people are unlikely to be confused by it. The protection given to a title is complicated. People sometimes say "You can't protect a title," but this is not true. Some titles can be registered as ...


3

I worked in bookstores for 10 years and libraries for five. You have no idea how often someone asks for a title that seems unique, but two or even three hits come up. It's even worse when it's a single word title. I'd check and see what the other book is about. If the subject matter is too similar and its recently published, it might cause confusion. But ...


3

Titles cannot be copyrighted or trademarked. Yes, “Star Wars” is trademarked, but not because of the book or movie. It is the toys and other goods that enable the trademark. So you should go ahead and use your title.


1

You might have to consult a lawyer, but from my time as a newspaper editor, I recall that (in the 1990s) BOOK TITLES WERE NOT SUBJECT TO COPYRIGHT. So long as you are not "attempting to trade upon the prestige of the earlier work by that title," (or words to that effect) you are okay. That means, in "real language," that so long as your ms. does not ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible