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21

If you are referring to "title case," where some words are capitalized and some aren't, there is no one standard rule. The AP stylebook says: Capitalize the principal words, including prepositions and conjunctions of four or more letters. Capitalize an article – the, a, an – or words of fewer than four letters if it is the first or ...


13

After the author writes the book, he submits it to the publisher, who then suggests edits all over the book, which the publisher believes will improve the book. Thus, it's really the author's choice, but the publisher can be insistent. Such suggested edits can be done to the title, or just parts of the entire work itself. It's still the author's decision, ...


12

The short answer is that there is no right answer. The hardest word choice in any book is the handful of words that make up the title. And if I were allowed to give advice then the advice I would give is to trust in magical word angels who will eventually whisper in your ear and tell you what the title should be. But let's say that the whispering word ...


8

I rather like "Hang Fire." Sounds mysterious and dangerous, it isn't quite grammatically correct as a phrase but it could be in the right context so it's got some tension pushing me towards exploring it, and it's visually evocative. I also encourage you to find a phrase or proverb in Russian which makes sense when translated to English and see if that ...


8

Off the top of my head: Why You Might Want To Leave Now Instead Of What You Wanted to Hear About, I Am Going To Talk About All The Things I'm Going To Try To Tell You If You'll Just Be Quiet The Stuff Standing Between You And Lunch I'm Going To Talk About The Following Because I Have The Remote A long time ago, in a galaxy far, ...


8

-ing. I am a tech writer, and this is typically how we word titles of sections that focus on how to accomplish a task.


7

It depends. For example, type "Time", or any other such common word, in Amazon. You will find there is more than book with that exact title. Certainly, when searching for books, I have found many books with the exact same title. In such cases, I use the author or genre to narrow down my search. On the other hand, if the book is in the same genre, then it ...


7

I see no reason for concern. The two words don't look the same, or even really sound the same. I don't see any reason anybody would get the two confused, certainly not on a scope that should worry you. Maybe if your novel gets turned into a multimillion dollar film, "Taiwan Sick" could be the title for the MAD Magazine lampoon :P Now, this isn't what you ...


7

Book titles are often duplicated quite by accident, and there is pretty much no way of preventing other people from publishing a book with the same title. It happens all the time, and as long as the title isn't something trademarked (like something in the Star Wars universe), it's generally not a problem. I'd recommend you concentrate on writing the book, ...


6

I think they actually have less say over the matter than that. Richard Dawkins has written quite a bit about the lack of choice authors have over their titles. Dawkin's publisher actually refused to let him title his most recent book "The Only Game in Town"; he had to settle for his second choice: "The Greatest Show on Earth". He's also bemoaned the ...


6

It's not that it's unsuitable, but the word play of "Ins and Outs" isn't very well matched with the subject of "Boolean Variables." "Ins and Outs" sounds like it's more about GPIO pins. I'd be tempted to do something like; "If This_Chapter == About_Boolean_Variables {Read}" ;)


6

An informal, jokey title is perfectly appropriate. This is especially true if, as I surmise, you're writing a progrmming manual of some sort. Computer science is a pretty informal field, after all. It's almost expected. The title isn't very eye-catching, but it's a common enough turn of phrase and there's nothing wrong with it, as such.


5

I like this advice that I heard long ago: Tell 'em what you're gonna' tell 'em. Tell 'em. Tell 'em what you told 'em. Adjourn. EDIT moved from a comment and added to this answer at the suggestion of @Neil Fein: It's a professional presentation, you're a professional, so act like one. The best opening, imo, is "what I'm going to talk about." Anything ...


5

I'd say that it doesn't matter at all. Titles are not required to be unique. A little searching can reveal dozens of short stories and novels that have shared titles, all without hurting recognition or sales. I would only be concerned about this if one of two things apply: The work whose title you share is very well-known in your genre. In that case ...


5

NOT Slap-Dash! Can you imagine the reviews of someone who doesn't like the book? I too like the notion of a phrase that feels like colloquial Russian, and captures the dualism of the hit man's role.


5

The short answer to your general question is "no." If the subsection is titled the same as the section, then either one of them is named incorrectly or else your outline is incorrect. An outline is supposed to be like this: Title: Great Cities of the World I. American Cities A. Large Cities 1. New York, NY 2. Chicago, IL B. Historical Cities ...


4

Find a phrase or topic that is relevant to your story. If any of these three pertains to something that happens or is stated in the story, then go with that. If none of them do, then try to think of something else. I like Lauren's suggestion to go with a Russian phrase that can be easily translated. Personally, the first two sound more like titles for a ...


4

This may seem like a trivial distinction, but as a title choice it's important as the title conveys an overall sense of the tone of the story. First of all, the use of the contraction didn't is less formal than without so it might be best to consider the verbiage you've used throughout the story and match the word choice to the formality of the voice in ...


4

First off, if you're writing for the government they might have a format they expect, so if so and it says something on this point, it wins. Otherwise, I would not use colons in any of your titles or paragraphs. The colon's job is to introduce what follows (e.g. in a list), but a title/subtitle/subsubtitle/etc structure already provides that implicitly. ...


4

Pick the story that represents the whole collection best and call it [That Story] & other tales, as someone already suggested. Or pick a completely different name - try to figure out what it is that connects your stories, is it a theme, character? Is it anything at all? Do these tales work together, or is the only thing connecting them that they were ...


4

If you're not the publisher, I wouldn't sweat it. The publisher will come up with a title; they always do.


4

I don't think that there is a general rule about dropping articles from the title, esp. in academic research papers, however, according to the book, How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper, a title of a paper is its label, and should therefore be succinct in its description. [Specifically,] the meaning and order of the words in the title are of ...


4

I don't know what a Gigaku Mask is, but I had no idea what The Stone Dance of the Chameleon was either, and that didn't prevent me to buy - and love - that book. Don't forget that the reader buys also by the cover and the resume, and that will probably give them more insight. If I had seen the picture of a Gigaku Mask, I would know it was some kind of ...


4

I think a title has two purposes: to get the attention of the potential reader, and to give him a clue what the story is about. Putting a foreign word or a word that is likely to be unfamiliar to most potential readers can attract attention. A natural response is, "What does that mean?", which may get them to look for more information. If the potential ...


4

I answer your question for APA. Psychological papers are very rigidly formatted, so possibly you have more leeway when following MLA, but I would suspect that the basics still apply. To answer your question, we must first understand what the purpose of the headings is. To understand that, let's take a step back and look at the paper's title. The APA Manual ...


4

You definitely want to avoid the kind of clash you're describing. Intuitively, the section is composed of smaller subsections, which expand on particular areas. So a clash feels like you're saying "And now, within the topic of (Topic X), let's talk about (Topic X)." Even if there's some kind of sense to it, it's confusing and should be avoided. The key to ...


4

In the US, the ISBN registrar Bowker allows changing the title. Their FAQ does not say anything about the ramifications of doing that. If you got the ISBN from someone else, ask whoever assigned the ISBN to your book. Once you assign an ISBN, your registrar will distribute the information, e.g. to Books In Print. So there my be catalogs with the old title, ...


3

You could go old "school" and stick with "Objectives".


3

At the start of your presentation, show This is going to be legen - wait for it, wait for it ... and at the end, instead of "THE END", put DARY!


3

It's often a matter of house style, if you are working with a publisher, and the style can vary within the same publisher, depending on the series. I've written many books for Peachpit Press, and they have two popular series with different styles. For example, imagine you were writing a book on PowerPoint (as I have). In their Visual QuickStart Guide series, ...



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