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14

Slow and steady wins the race. Cliché's out the way (although I do think it's true), one of the things I find with writing is that you should always stick to what you're comfortable with, unless you're finding it detrimental to your writing. So, if you're doing 250 words/hour, and feel that's too slow, then I would suggest you set yourself an easy target. ...


13

Time is based on an Event. We are in the year 2010 because someone inaccurately took the birth of Jesus Christ as the base (hence b.c. And a.d. denominations). Other cultures have other years, I believe either the China or the Arabian countries have a completely different year. In the Star Wars Extended Universe, the battle of Yavin is the base for their ...


11

Firstly, you need to make a living so you can eat, pay the bills, and support yourself. If you like the job, and enjoy programming, take the job. Being able to support yourself from just your writing from word go is a tall order indeed; I don't think there are many writers out there that are able to do that from their first book. Secondly, having a job ...


11

Once a physics professor told me that we, in daily life, measure distance with time. In fact he is right. If somebody aks - "how far away is the mall?", we answer "It's fifteen minutes away". That means that measures are always relative to normal everyday standards, not scientific ones. In old days, moon or sun was a good way to measure time: "It will ...


10

I can think of a few ways: 1) Cheat. This was how Tolkien did it, so you'd be in good company. He just listed somewhere in the appendices that "Year 5798 by Gondor's calendar = 144 Shire Reckoning" and let the readers do the math. 2) Make the characters work out a solution. If you have characters on Terra and characters on Pluto who meet, they're going to ...


10

If you look to Tolkien, you see no time. Everything is long ago, far away, in the past, whatever. I am a dork of the numeric kind, so I'm forever trying to squash my tendency to use "real" numbers, because I think it's mostly unnecessary, limiting, and a little jarring...When you speak, you never use exact time. The closest you're going to get is "a few ...


10

Your writing career will only end if you stop writing. Period. So don't stop writing. You may not have as much time as you want, or as much as you think you need. But don't stop. Write at night, write on the weekend, write over lunch. If you want it badly enough, don't look for excuses to stop writing. Look for excuses to continue writing.


9

Don't look at it as ending your career. Think of it more as gaining more real-world experience to enrich your writing. Maybe you'll go through something that you can apply to your story. I've found that through working in an area that's not writing (in IT as well) I meet people and learn many things that have helped my writing and understanding of my plots ...


8

I understand your concern; minutes at least are very much a reflection of an age of clockwork and in a world with no such machines detailed measures of time jar the reader. I don't know the exact setting of your world, by which I mean that if it's medieval that allows for wildly different tech to if it's Aztec, but here are a few general suggestions: Hour ...


8

How much do you suppose that your fantasy world resembles our own world? And how much do you want to deal with made-up units of measure? I don't suppose that the people in a fantasy world would speak English, but fantasy novels written for an English-speaking audience normally have all dialog in English. Perhaps you could explain that by saying that the ...


6

You may not like this suggestion, and it may not necessarily work financially, but it's an idea that I'm seriously considering: how about temporarily picking up a manual labor job, like washing dishes or bagging groceries? Instead of thinking of manual labor as being menial work for the uneducated, you could think of it as being thinking time, free from the ...


6

Like others have said, if writing is truly something you want to do, you can find time to do it. Lunch, breaks, nights (stay up an extra hour). Any time you go to turn on the TV, stop and ask, "why aren't I writing instead?" I'm also a software developer, and I have a wife and three young kids, but I've been able to write nearly 60,000 words on my first ...


6

When it comes to writing, you should not try to portray things as you have seen them so, because it would not make the readers interested in it if the things you describe is not special or unusual ones. Whether you go to the places are special or not, The writing can make the them special. Or you should show the readers how did you see,feel about that and ...


5

AP Style requires a.m. or p.m. -- lower case, separated by periods. There is no need for an additional period if the sentence ends with the time. The briefing began at 2:30 p.m. This would be the correct format for anything journalistic (newspaper, magazine, wire service, etc.) In addition, many other publications and websites will ask for things to ...


5

If you set any part of your story in a place and time which your readers will recognize, that part will eventually be dated. That's simply fact. Look at The Invisible Man or The Time Machine or The First Men in the Moon. Those are all classics of scifi, but the parts set in the "present" feel, clearly, of that time. The question is whether the non-Earth ...


5

If the units of time are established, then yes, that's a good way - providing you add the mode of transportation. Five minutes of leisurely walk away Eight hours of forced march A fortnight on horseback an overnight train ride Three hours of flight on dragon back Two days by a blimp Walk ahead for three prayers, then turn left. Thirty generations in an ark ...


5

five and a half years No hyphens. Hyphens are for adjective phrases: It was a five-and-a-half-year journey. You also don't use the hyphen with the fraction. 51⁄2 years


5

If your concern is the how-to of changing perspective, you can do it a few ways, but the idea should always be that you finish one beat, and the next beat starts the different time-voice: 1) End the current chapter and start a new one. That allows you to have a different POV, a different time-scale, a different location, anything. 2) End the current ...


5

Different writers have different writing disciplines. Mark Twain said that his discipline was to write a certain number of pages per day, but he wrote in longhand and as he got older he began to write in a larger and larger hand, so that his actual output was less. He was, he confessed, a profoundly lazy man. I read that Stephen King used the "pages per ...


5

Mercedes Lackey's Valedmar series has established candles (of a specific although unexplained size) which burn steadily enough to be marked off and used for timekeeping. So "three marks" (that is, however long it takes the candle to melt down three of the marks carved or painted on the side) is three hours. I have never heard of measuring time in prayers ...


3

"how to cleanly change time scale and avoid making a somewhat jarring break in temporal continuity?" Gradually. You are allowed to suddenly shift speed of passage of time only at * * * section breaks. The speed of passage of time between paragraphs must be gradual, at least one paragraph per speed. Paragraph of second-by-second, paragraph of few ...


3

If you are just using dates in narration, as opposed to in dialog, you could just use Gregorian dates. When an American or European writes a history book today, they routinely use the Gregorian calendar even if that's not the calendar used by the people they're talking about. This only matters if the date itself is significant to the subjects. If the ...


3

What you are talking about isn't "voice", but a scene change. If something is important to your to your scene, you need to describe it in detail. This is especially true in scenes with danger or suspense. So if your heroes are entering a dungeon, where you know there is a monster hiding, you may describe the dungeon in great detail, making the characters ...


3

Details will always date, but you should add whatever details you feel bring a sense of truthfulness. Take The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy: Arthur Dent starts off in southern England. There is a muddy driveway, a dressing gown, a pub, salted peanuts, a leather satchel, 3 pints of beer at lunchtime and then ten minutes later he's on a Vorgon sparecraft ...


3

I really wouldn't worry too much about words per hour. I agree with Craig (and Dean Wesley Smith) that 1000 words an hour is a good, sustainable rate, at least for some genres, but I don't think professional writers got there by trying consciously to write faster - I think that the faster writing comes naturally as you get more comfortable with your craft. ...


3

Just by way of example. This year I am writing a blog of fairy tales and have evolved a system for the folk to tell the time without the widespread use of definite timepieces. The day in any major settlement is split into a number of bells (presumably the bell ringers have hourglasses or similar to keep track of when the bell should be rung). The bells run ...


3

In his guide to productive academic writing, How to Write a Lot, psychologist Paul J. Silvia recommends that you perceive and organize your writing as a job: set aside regular and fixed periods of time for your writing do not let anything come between you and writing: neither "not feeling like it" nor a bored spouse must keep you from getting to work on ...


3

You might intersperse your travel with the basic history and geography of Belize (the interesting parts). Pretend you (in your story) are reading a book about Belize, and skipping to the juicy bits.


2

On the off chance that this isn't a novel, just be consistent. Some writing (academic, non-fiction, and news, for example) is edited to a style guide, and most style guides will have a preferred way to format times and dates. For fiction, and particularly in dialog, you specifically don't want to come up with a consistent system unless you want everything ...


2

I write about 350 words an hour and judging from what i've read about famous writers (like Hemingway or Jack london) who typically only write 1,000 words a day while working around 4 hours a day or more, their words rate must be quite slow. fiction is an inefficent business.



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