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16

There is indeed such a term. Phil Farrand of The Nitpicker's Guide to Star Trek called this "being the cabbagehead." Certain information had to be revealed to the audience, but it was information which the characters would reasonably already know. So the writers picked someone in the room to be the "cabbagehead," meaning someone developed the I.Q. of a ...


8

According to the tvtropes entry for The Watson, The Watson is the character whose job it is to ask the same questions the audience must be asking and let other characters explain what's going on. A sidekick sometimes acts in this role. According to wikipedia, Sidekicks can provide one or multiple functions, such as a counterpoint to the hero, an ...


5

A "draft" is one complete pass-through of writing a piece (an article, blog post, short story, novella, novel, etc.). Your "first draft" is generally considered the first time you commit the entire thing to paper (or pixels), from beginning to end. After that, you can measure subsequent drafts or rounds however you like. It's reasonable to divide them as ...


4

I would see these as transitions, bits which help move the reader smoothly from one thought (spread over one or several paragraphs) to the next. I think presenting it that way will give your students a clear reason whether to use this literary tool: Am I introducing a new thought? Am I wrapping up the previous thought? If not, then remove the phrase.


4

The term is metadiscourse, or communication about the communication. Sometimes they help guide the reader through a complex line of reasoning. Sometimes they add emphasis or rhythm. Sometimes they're just noise. "Use them liberally" (from your other post) seems like coarse advice, perhaps useful until students can distinguish for themselves whether the text ...


3

Contrasting/adversative conjunctions. adversative (ədˈvɜːsətɪv) grammar adj 1. (Linguistics) (of a word, phrase, or clause) implying opposition or contrast. But and although are adversative conjunctions introducing adversative clauses n 2. (Linguistics) an adversative word or speech element


3

That would be the "author bio" Here are some links that may be of use: http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/07/how-to-write-a-terrific-author-bio/ http://www.absolutewrite.com/freelance_writing/bio.htm


3

I'm a computer technitian. Every week, here at the office, we joke about a NCIS episode where the hacker and another guy fight against another hacker by using the keyboard at amazing speed and writing random commands. Evertybody from IT knows that is ridiculous. Hacking does not work in that way, neither it's possible to stop an invader just by starting a ...


2

TVTropes calls such a character The Watson: The Watson is the character whose job it is to ask the same questions the audience must be asking and let other characters explain what's going on. I don't know if it is desirable to have such a character (I'll let the more qualified people here answer on that one), but given the large number of examples ...


2

I've never heard an actual term for a character created only for the purpose of educating the reader, so I'll focus on #2. It seems like it could turn into lazy way to introduce a large amount of exposition or backstory very quickly. This kind of touches that basic rule of showing, not telling. If you cover a complicated issue by having one character ...


2

Dittos to Lauren Ipsum. I'd add: Don't get hung up over how many drafts to write, or whether a given set of changes is sufficient to call this a new draft. I can't imagine any value in agonizing over whether you are presently on your 4th draft or your 5th. There's no rule that says you have to make revisions all over the document with every pass. It's ...


1

Anything can qualify as allusion. The caveat is, it must go smoothly with the main theme, and contain another, veiled message; it must have a simple main theme, which is different from the theme it alludes to. So, if your quote teaches us two different things, and your introduction is about one of them, it will allude to the other one. You can't just drop a ...



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