Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

There's some very good answers here. Basically supporting the idea that a change in tense just to satisfy the potential pedantry of a reader is not worth doing. { There's some people just looking for an excuse. "She had eyes? What does she have now?"} But I'd like to focus on the question of "What would be the effect of switching tenses?" A judicious ...


0

The answer to your question depends on the temporal point of view of your narrator. Independent of the tense of your writing, and independent of first or third person narrative, your narrator can either narrate the events as they happen, i.e. he is right there and talking about what he experiences, either as the protagonist or as a (virtual) witness, or ...


0

In English we normally relate stories entirely in the past tense. "She had green eyes." If she's still alive presumably she still has green eyes, but that isn't the point. You're talking about what someone did or saw or thought or felt at the time of the incidents in the story. Those are all in the past. Consider, "The house was painted green." At the time ...


1

In narration, stay in one tense. "She had green eyes" is fine, because your entire story is in the past tense — the "present-past," if that makes sense. If she had green eyes as a child but has brown eyes in the present of your story, you might say "She used to have green eyes, but now she had brown." Still past tense, but used to have indicates it's a ...


0

She had green eyes is fine. Readers will undersand that her eye color is still the same since, in real life most people's eyes don't change color. Maybe another example will help. He drove a blue Ford Explorer. However, now he drives a red Volkswagen Beetle. Well, in that case you could say, That was when he drove the blue Ford Explorer. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included