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I see your problem, humans can show striking ingenuity in constructing narratives to support the notion that everything is a divine sign. I can only come up with two solutions: The chaotic one. Rather than trying to destroy her narrative, have her realize that different narratives can be constructed around the same events and take agency as the writer of ...


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Let everything fall apart in your idea of what should happen - I am referring to your 'turning point' since I don't know what it means, and the only person it matters to is you. Then see what happens. After the structure, the rules. After the after.


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Put the backstory into the mouth of a character, rather than narration. If I opened, say, a mystery story, and it began, "Fred Smith murdered his brother John," I would understand that to mean that that is what actually happened. If later in the story I read that in fact Fred didn't kill John, I'd be turning back to that page and saying, "Wait, but back ...


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My advice to you is don't write about pain if you don't know pain. I would never have included so much pain in my stories back before I felt the torture of pain's company every day. Remembering pain won't help you either--it has to be with you now, inside you, gripping you. We are biologically programmed to forget pain once it has passed.


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Usually people find things moving when they identify with them. So your best bet is to start with an identifiable character, and then show that person making choices that, while they might be wrong, the audience can imagine themselves making. Consider the show "Breaking Bad." The main character is originally a likeable person in a common profession. His ...


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You appear to be writing your "the story so far" from the point of view of an omniscient narrator, hence your concern abut lying. Instead, describe events through a character lens. You can do this by writing these parts from the point of view of a particular character -- treat it as a speech, diary, or other thing that the character wrote. Another way to ...


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But I can't have the narrator simply lie to the reader Sure you can. That's called an unreliable narrator. Instead of having a generic narrator-to-reader chapter, your "The Story So Far" material can be delivered via some other medium, or two characters who aren't in your story otherwise. It can be a newspaper article, a series of emails, a radio ...


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Oh man, it really bugs me when all the characters know a secret but I don't. It feels deceptive and manipulative. What works is to have a character who's also ignorant of the secret. Tell the story from their perspective. Then the reveal is not pointed at the reader, but at the character. In The Sixth Sense Bruce Willis is that ignorant character. The ...


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The plotline you're describing (good guy goes bad) is, in itself, cliche, BUT that doesn't make it intricately a bad thing. The key to doing this well is to make it believable. To make the reader connect with the character, even as he's turning evil, because the circumstances allow for no other reasonable option. Anything short of that will most likely fail ...


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You could make the story lighter by setting some scenes in a peaceful landscape, perhaps in the homes of the characters, showing who they are fighting for. You could have the protagonists suffer defeats and setbacks and hardships in the first chapters, and start to break down, and seem on the verge of defeat. Then have chapters set in the enemy camp,and ...


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A simple way is to differentiate the narrative voice. Your narration should be clean, standard, grammatically correct prose, while these narrated thoughts can sound a bit choppier and more like speech. (Separately, this is much harder to do if your book is in the present tense, so I'm shifting it to past for now.) Leeanna had been taken to an unknown ...


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What I would do, is give the characters something to look forward to. Give them something to fight for. They need a motivation to keep going, something to comfort them in their time of need. I think by giving the characters this, you'd be able to make them have more courage and generally be happier for what is to come. Always give characters a motivation.


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You can talk to real-life veterans and see how they coped with war. One tactic is "gallows humor" or "black humor," which is seeing the humor even in grim moments (common to veterans, law enforcement officers, doctors, and first responders). The TV show MASH was essentially built on this. There are many examples on the TV Tropes page (consider yourself duly ...


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Some of the stories that I have read are incredibly dark, based simply on the events that occur, but did not feel that way when read. Bringing out a lighter side can be done in a number of ways: Characters/ Relationships Having characters that are hopeful or optimistic will go a long way to brightening a story (unless they are annoyingly optimistic to the ...


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The best method would be to make the downfall fairly slow. Make sure it is quite detailed, and let the reader truly understand the downfall. I suggest a good deal of inner dialogue. As for what you should avoid, try and keep the anti hero in character. For instance, if they are rational and like to think things through, have them reason out why they are ...



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