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Putting a sentence in a paragraph by itself does give it emphasis. It can also break up the monotony of a sequence of long paragraphs. Brandon Sanderson once said (on the Writing Excuses podcast) that he likes to add a one-sentence paragraph after every few long paragraphs. But take care not to use this trick so often that the reader notices. What ...


3

An excellent question, and a permanent source of controversy and disagreement in fantasy and science fiction. Let's try to break this down: Basics of worldbuilding. You cannot construct an entire world out of whole cloth. It's simply not possible, primarily because the world is much larger than most of us tend to notice on a day-to-day basis. If your ...


5

It is like writing English. Obviously people in a fantasy world or the far future won't speak English, yet you present their dialogue in English (or whatever language you write in). Does that put readers off? Certainly not. Writing in a fantasy language is what would put readers off! Terms are the same. If you use the current (in your language) general term ...


1

If you use obscure terms most readers never heard of, you're bound to alienate the readers. For me quipao doesn't elicit any connotations; I don't know this word, so it will be entirely alien to me. If the world has no connection to Earth whatsoever, you'd better have a very good excuse for them developing a copy of Chinese culture. A dimensional gate? A ...


0

It all depends on what you write further. At first your readers might think, "Hey Chinese...", but as you write on, what you write will change their view. If you stick to the steroe-typical chinese stuff, yes they will keep thinking chinese, but if you write away from or not about stereo-typial chinese stuff, they will follow you into whatevet you are ...


0

I'm interested in this question also, but for sci-fi that is unrelated to Earth or Earth culture. As to your specific example: I am probably better educated about other societies than the average American (which isn't saying much), but I've never heard the term qipao. How about kimono? Not the same thing, but a more familiar word. As to your general ...


1

As has been said by others, it sort of depends on the perspective. This might be troubling to write in first person for the exact reason mentioned - the character is probably not paying attention. In that case, you might be better off having him revisit the experience in a flashback later. However, if we're dealing with any other perspective, I think it's ...



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