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0

It depends a bit on the topic (or any possible guidelines you have to adhere to), but the best way is to have a specific section/chapter you can refer to. For example: [...], as I will explicate in more detail in section 3.4. or [...]. To this I will return in chapter 4. Overall, however, don't overdo it. Doing it once or twice is OK, but excessive ...


1

If you're on a Mac, you can't use yWriter. :) Beyond that, from the screenshots it looks like yWriter only allows you to break into chapters, while Scrivener lets you have files in folders with no restraints on organization, as deep as you like, plus photos and audio files. Scrivener has many tools, like Word Count Goals, frequency analysis, a name ...


0

What I did in one of my stories is to have the character change her mind about "fate," even while believing in "signs." Briefly, my heroine meets a man who echoes something she did before her trauma. But while she continues to believe in fate, she starts to question the premise that her fate is not to meet a kind man. Because she also takes this "echoing as ...


0

I was planning to do this when I start with the other character's POV and somehow explain how she was able to see things from his eyes when she wakes up, but there is a problem with that plan. I see absolutely no problem with that. If your character's magic/superpower/special abilities allow her to experience the world from someone else's point of view,...


0

Patricia Briggs did almost exactly this in her Mercy Thompson novel Frost Burned. The series overall (this is book 8) is told in the first person from Mercy's POV, but in two chapters Briggs shifts into third person, and the story is told from the perspective of the main character's husband. She labels those two chapters "Adam." It's just those two chapters. ...


2

To be honest, I couldn't even follow it in the question. I wonder if you may just be trying too hard not to have a narrator. I realize everyone wants to do first person narration these days, but that is a highly restrictive form and often results in false notes even when the protagonist stays conscious. Even with a first person narrator, though, it is ...


1

I hate to try to divine motive, but are you sure this is a story question? It sounds more like you are trying to make an argument than tell a story, more like you are trying to find a way to convince that reader that their lives are not governed by fate than that you are trying to find a convince the character. The destruction of someone's life view is ...


0

I think you need to present an alternative explanation of why things happen, and provide your character reason to believe the alternative. For example: Chaos. Everything happens at random. Have the character get to know one of two men based on the roll of a die. Human Agency: Things happen because we cause them to happen. Have the character do something ...


0

The most productive thing to do is make sure you have an environment that allows you to remember and operate mentally on the detailed results of your thinking, without having to set everything down. This is so you don't get into the habit of writing as soon as anything comes to mind and editing it, and rewriting it, over and over. A more productive habit is ...


2

This seems like a great idea, and possibly the best way to approach this would be to have the time of disorientation be relatively brief. I've not written dream sequences ever, so I don't have any suggestions beyond making it obvious that it's a dream sequence. Possibly making what is occurring straightforward for the reader, but with signals that it isn't ...


5

If you want the scene to initially be confusing, go ahead! Since it's written in first person, that's just realistic. However, keep it brief. It would probably be rather annoying to try to read through more than a paragraph of stuff that makes no sense, and readers might just want to skip it. Also, to make sure they don't continue to feel confused after ...


0

A disoriented character does not have a perspective. A perspective is what you have when the world makes sense to you. When you are disoriented, you don't have a perspective. You have a whirl of sensations the refuse to resolve into a perspective. I seem to remember that it was Dr. Johnson who said something to the effect that you cannot reproduce the ...


1

I'm thinking it would be kind of easier if it was the protagonist experiencing someone else in that situation. In that sense if they were in a situation (for example) where the protagonist was the best friend, of a girl who had just been dumped, not only would you have to describe her crying but the gestures she makes as well as the gestures the protagonist ...


1

I had a similar problem with my current novel project. The first draft was quite horrible, exactly due to the fact that my characters felt like stereotypes cut and pasted from my literature research. I had several episodes in mind that I read about and wanted to include in the novel - say, for example, the story of a couple in the 60s: The husband is at sea ...


0

"In a nutshell," Romeo and Juliet was the "classic" story along this line. Admittedly, that was a "boy-girl" story, but you could have an "all boy" story along similar lines. The two schools are "rivals" after all. If there was a plot development that made them "hate" each other, that would create the conflict you want.


1

Do it any way you want. "He's your psychopath" with apparently a posse. No better way to "give a mass murderer away" than to see how those around him and are part of his gang view him since it would appear he is their leader of some sort. A classic is of course Captain Ahab in Moby Dick. The story is not told from his point of view.


2

Doing research for characters can only be good, as it will make sure that they do not break the suspension of disbelief. If you make characters that do not fit with their upbringing, they will seem too fake to be able to relate to. The difficulty with character building is finding a good balance in each character between interesting and believable. A ...


-2

I am afraid it is the best way how to discourage everybody from reading something like that. I am serious, characters need to be someway interesting, being alive, believable. (I can imagine a story of a writer trying that way and - will fail.)


1

To be unoriginal the new friend can have the proverbial "deep dark secret."


1

I think I understand what you're after. Here are a few examples that come to mind: Karl quietly befriends boy, boy is mocked or teased by others, boy is significantly injured or killed as a result of bullying or self-harming, and Karl carries the weight of having done nothing. Karl befriends boy, is jealous of boy because of confidence or other issues, ...


1

Let's start with 2. It's up to you - nobody decides anything about your manuscript except you. Do you want them to be background characters? Then let them be background characters. Do you want them to play a major part? Then don't let them be background characters. As for 1, It would be controversial if you wished it to be so, by assigning certain ...


1

Anything can happen, avoid telling the reader how they should feel directly. But if you think of something dramatic, extreme or awesome think about what characters may usually forget when they're in a burning inferno /building from how they got around 'slump'or 'heavy' to what they think or remember for short times. Just write what they may forget to feel ...


9

For the sensory input, instead of "you see/feel/smell/touch/taste," try moving the thing to the front of the sentence or phrase to make it the subject. Instead of "You see a shiny red rock," try: A shiny red rock glints in the gravel at the side of the road. This presupposes (rather than stating explicitly) that the reader is looking at the red rock ...



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