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Ah the eternal question in all art forms. What is music? So John Cage created 4'33" What is dance? So someone I forget who, possibly Merce Cunningham, stepped on stage and didn't move, and then left. What is a painting? So many a painter put a blank canvas on the wall. What is an artist name? The artist formerly known as Prince.


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Bracketed statements are typically found inside quotes. The words are bracketed to indicate that they were not the exact words from the quotes, but are either paraphrased or included to give clarity to the words. To use your example a little bit, suppose that the actual quote was "See that hill over there? The man walked up that thing last night." Now, if ...


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This is widely accepted, a rather common "flavor". Yes, there are legal implications, unless you use public domain works or made-up citations. In case of citations from works still covered by copyright, such use is not covered by Fair Use clause (unless you're parodying the content of the citation in in the following chapter, or referring to it by some ...


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Chapters don't need to have a title. "Chapter NN" is fine. Or you can have only a title — that's generally when the title identifies some kind of shift, like a different time, location, or narrator/POV focus. So you can have Chapter 1 Chapter 6 Chapter 47 or Location: Vulcan, 2265 POV: Brienne Time: A few hours ...


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The Chicago Manual of Style says that "unspoken discourse" can be either in quotations marks or not according to the author's preference. (Referencing some of the other respondents' contributions, Chicago does mention that in some countries em dashes are used for dialogue. I can only come from an American English perspective on this.) A good way to bypass ...


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In all written English, dialogue by a character should be quoted as well as any other vocalized words. Ei. the character is talking to himself. Inner dialogue and thoughts should be italicized. The only real difference between dialects should be small punctuation changes, like whether to use single quotes or double.


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I've found a happy medium in referencing the name of the character, or in this case "the man", about every 3-4 uses of the pronoun, which ends up being about once a paragraph. However, your writing tends to unexpectedly switch between third and first person and I don't quite feel like I'm understanding parts of your writing so I apologise if I get some ...


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The pronouns do not feel repetitive to me at all. Whichever novel you read, it will have an endless row of hes or shes or Is throughout the text. It is the common and therefore neutral way, and does not stand out or annoy. Only "the man" may get repetitive, because we are used to reading a person's name, usually once per paragraph. But if you keep "the man" ...


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Mark twain said "Write what you know" If you are passionate about what you are writing then you are capable of producing brilliant art. It's still for the best to seek out as much knowledge as you can about whatever art you have chosen though.


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The thing is that people tend to confuse writing with writing. Think, for a moment, of winning a marathon or singing an opera. Everyone can hurry along to a degree or sing under the shower, yet no one who has been hurrying to work for fifty years or singing under the shower every morning for decades would expect to win the NY Marathon or to be hired to ...


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I have found it interesting to think in terms of words written probably 1-2 million words for most writers (note this isn't necessarily the amount you will need to get published- but to be good. But it is important that you do 'deliberate practice' as part of this otherwise you will just become a prolific hack. It is an even older adage that it takes 10 ...



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