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Ask yourself a basic question: why are my two characters speaking to each other? Chances are, it is for one of the following reasons: to prove how witty they are (and, by extension, how witty you are as author) to ask about something to confirm or deny something to avert suspicion to blame or praise someone to promise or threaten something to explain ...


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Why do you believe you have too much dialogue? To take the question to an extreme, have you ever read a play? It's all dialogue, and yet plot happens. Now, I understand you're not trying to write a play. But if your strong point is good dialogues, why not work with it? You can write the dialogue, then add descriptions of how your characters said something, ...


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Everyone has their own writing style. If you tend to write more dialogues, put story into dialogues. Or write out suspicious dialogue which creates doubts in readers mind (if you are writing out a thriller). But yes story is always important, never matter if its with or without dialogue.


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One thing to note is that people don't (or shouldn't) talk this way on the radio. Each person should have a name, number, or other identifier. You start each message (or at least the first few in each exchange) with the name of the person you're addressing, followed by your own. For instance, when I'm on first aid duty (my tag: Stadium 111), I hear: ...


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If there's "not enough story," that's your primary problem. If the story is solid, how much dialogue to include is a simpler choice. Where did you get the idea that there is not enough story? Reader feedback? One way to think of dialogue is that it is an action (forget about Tarantino style banter for now). If you are letting the reader know about verbal ...


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First develop your plot from start to finish. Divide the story into scenes. Then develop your characters and give them the appropriate dialog at the appropriate moments. This way, no matter how much dialog you write, it won't hinder you from the plot, which you will have already done. Then as you begin to edit your story, delete everything that doesn't ...


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Find a non-cliche way of showing that she was crying. I always think back to Updike's comment about Salinger: "In an ardently admiring piece on Salinger years back, Updike confessed a misgiving about the Glass family that is difficult to gainsay. He quoted Seymour quoting R. H. Blyth's definition of sentimentality: 'We are being sentimental when we give to ...


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in an embarrassing situation, for example a bully at school, you could say "I had to blink back tears"


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This is related to both touch typing and the Dvorak keyboard. This is not an attempt at an answer, but a testimony of my experiences. This is linked to Is touch typing skill important for being a good writer?, and How important is typing speed to a successful writing career?, and Is it worth learning to touch type, and also Is it worth switching to Dvorak? ...


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As has been mentioned earlier, the method for NaNoWriMo is very effective. It's how I got through my first manuscript in 2 and a half months. I suggest a few things to help with this: Start with an outline/basic idea of what you want. This will help prevent writers block and major rewrites later on. Don't stop to consider word choice, sentence structure, ...


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One common way to do this is to have one character that is as new to the environment and knows as little about it as the reader. (I think this is what meer2kat was talking about above.) Then as the character learns when s/he needs to know, the readers learn it, too. For example, if you've read DUNE, consider the part where Paul and mother run away to live ...


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As "what" mentioned above, NaNoWriMo is definitely a great resource to use to motivate you to produce a lot of writing in a limited amount of time. For your current project, these are my suggestions: Pace yourself. Plan out how much you plan to write each day to meet your goal of 100 pages in 2 weeks. (That's approximately 7 pages a day, but you'll ...


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I would poke around Wikipedia and just find some obscure yet interesting event that happened 50 to 500 years ago. Flesh out the story with your own made up stuff. Boom, there you go! Also, do an outline, it will help in fleshing out details. Clyde Cussler does this a lot and he is a very successful writer.


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First of all I'd ask myself what kind of book it's supposed to be, and what kind of audience I'd make it for. Then I'd ask myself what this audience expects me to produce (if writing a romance novel for instance there'd be a huge emphasis on describing the bodies; creating actual notes of word-banks that might be used might help). Then I'd find a theme I'd ...


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NaNoWriMo challenges everyone to write 50.000 words in one month. I took part in November 2013 and wrote a little over 50.000 words in ten days. What I did was just write, whatever came into my head, without caring much for perfect style or story logic. I later went over the whole thing more slowly and rewrote to polish the language and clean up plot holes. ...


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The probem with a cliché is not what happens but how you describe it. People cry. Even protagonists cry. And tears do roll down people's cheeks when they cry. This is not a cliché, it is a fact, and it is not rare either but a frequent occurence. Any advice that tells you not to write about what happens frequently in real ife is bad advice. Cliché happens ...


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The problem with sentimentalism is not that it's sentimental. But that it often results in cliche. This is a sample of non-cliched sentimentalism: "Once that first tear broke free, the rest followed in an unbroken stream. Naoko bent forward where she sat on the floor and pressing her palms to the mat, she began to cry with the force of a person ...


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It depends on whether it's the protagonist or non-protagonist is crying. I wouldn't think it's effective to have the protagonist crying. I haven't done a lot of crying scene, but the ones I have done I have underplayed so much in order to emphasize the inner pain. Crying works best when the protagonist is observing someone else cry. In my opinion the sad ...


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Agree with MissMonicaE's answer. If you feel you need to change the sequence of events "just to mix things up", then your story was boring. Now it is boring and confusing. All other things being equal, people prefer linear storytelling. For example, Tolkien skillfully uses nonlinear storytelling in Lord of the Rings, but only because he must -- he ...


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It's fine to use flashbacks, but you should make sure you're doing it for a reason, rather than "just to mix things up." For instance, you could give us day 1 (present, Character 1) -> day 10 (present, Character 1) -> day 5 (past, Character 2) if you want to reveal Character 2's actions after you reveal how Character 1 reacted to the results of ...



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