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1

You describe post-traumatic stress disorder. I would start with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV or V for psychiatry. The PTSD section isn't that long. However, I'll add "blocking it out" has been considered a medically incorrect concept for about 30 years or more and usually appears sophomoric in fiction. (It is, of course, possible to forget ...


1

What, in the end, are you asking? You have planned out parts of the story: your protagonist blocking an incident and that incident 'defines her character and life choices'. It seems like you have decided what is going to happen whatever. Yet you want information that is believable without you having to take the trouble to 'dive too deeply into psychological ...


1

I had a friend whose mother remembered being fed human flesh as a child. This was late in WW2 in Holland, at time when everyone was starving and many died. She was a cheerful older lady. If she was traumatized by it, it didn't show. In real life, people react in many different ways. Some find it easier to take things in their stride. Others might be ...


0

The characters should start the story with a need --probably subconscious --for someone in the opposite role. The son-figure may not think he needs a father, but he's in desperate of advice, guidance, a male role model. The father figure may have been running from the commitment a family represents, but he's keenly feeling how empty his life is. If ...


0

Relationships are contrived. They are contrived by the people in them. They are formed because one of the parties sets out, more or less deliberately, with more or less forethought, to create the relationship. In other words, relationships are the result of courtships. We are social creatures and we court other people all the time. In many cases, the ...


0

Have them face the worst possible moment of their lives together. For example, if they were in an earthquake and got trapped in the basement of a building, just the two of them, with no way to call for help and limited food and water and the air running out and both are injured in some way … if they get out of that together, they will be each other’s ...


0

It sounds like you want to write a film treatment. This is a recognized approach for creating and marketing story ideas to the film and television industry. Typically, you start out by creating and organizing the story elements using index cards (or similar software). Or, if you are working on an adaptation, you start from a short story or news article. ...


3

Research is surely the way to go. An even deeper alternative would be to lose your hearing, not forever of course. Just wear protective earplugs or some gear of that sort, and try interacting with your family/friends for more than a week. You'll get first hand experience to how it feels to be suddenly isolated from the world of sounds. You may vocally get ...


0

This depends a lot on the context of course (not to mention the genre, if applicable), but try to see it from as a realistic perspective as possible - if indeed your goal is to make it appear natural. How do people get closer in real-life? Sociological causes: When they have to be united against something else. There is an element of tribalism involved, ...


0

There should be a natural draw between them, as if they would normally be friends. If the younger character has a backstory similar to the older character or someone the older character cares/cared about, that would help. The "father" role is very tough to build with a stranger, but mentor or "uncle" is easier. Keep in mind bonds are formed through shared ...


2

There's no substitute for research. Either find a deaf group in your area or contact a national group, or possibly Gaulladet University, and start talking to people.


0

Make the older guy more forgiving. Make the older guy more forgiving. Long story short, the older man doesn't want the kid to drive fast. But he is in charm, drives fast, and got into some huge trouble with some rich guy. But instead of beating him up, he tries to ease his pain, etc., you can do whatever you like, from sci-fi to horror or old time.


0

If marijuana is legal where you live, you should consider it. The marijuana you find on the street is typically “party marijuana,” but at a dispensary, you will find many different strains for all kinds of purposes, including treating ADD and OCD, while allowing you to still think clearly and have creative energy. A key thing is that they don’t have the ...


0

Don't be offended, but what does OCD have to do with this? What intrusive thoughts are you dealing with that keep you from writing? Is it just the editing and rewriting too much, so much that you realize its not a real problem with the writing but OCD? Is it you need this "feeling" to make the words "flow." Most people with OCD realize something in their ...


0

You might try voice recording instead of writing. I sometimes brainstorm by recording during my morning commute. It uses a different part of your brain... Can't hurt to try.


0

Listen to music. I suggest Two Steps From Hell or Thomas Bergerson. Both of them write inspirational music pieces that will let your mind be transported somewhere else other than scrutinizing your work. Another thing: is it because you've been diagnosed with OCD that you feel you can't write freely anymore? Maybe this diagnosis has put a mental block in ...


2

There are plotters, and discovery writers. You sound like a plotter. There's nothing wrong with that. Take the time you need to outline your story so you feel comfortable with it, and additionally accept that things will change as you go. There are many different methods to creating a plot, and none of them are wrong; you just have figure out what works for ...


0

Well, I just spill my heart and soul and guts onto the page, and then arrange it all into a good book afterwards. I am doing this with the first book I've ever written, and although it takes a couple of years, you eventually get good enough to edit it into something great. Cheerio!


1

Start writing. Don't be so afraid to get it wrong. A writer can get a long way by emphasizing quantity over quality.


2

Funny thing, I wrote software reviews (or rather comparisions) professionally for five years. To ensure a fair review and a round article four different people were involved: First: Me as the writer Second: My editor. She checked my research for errors. Tested the things I had tested and described, to make sure the errors I found weren't just temporary ...


1

Find something -- anything -- nice to say. Lead with that. Present your dislikes subjectively; a lot of "didn't work for me" and "not my type of fiction" etc. (If you want to be nice, that is). Try to close with something nice. This is known as "sandwich" reviewing, for obvious reasons.


2

Even though the details of the question are off the topic of writing, I think that the question itself is sound. Writing reviews is writing. And if you're going to be a well respected writer, you have to be honest. If you're going to be honest, you're going to have to give some bad reviews. In my opinion, the best you can do is remember this: honesty ...


0

Maybe something you could do is to keep in mind that while you’re writing from the perspective of the person reading it, the journal itself is written from the perspective of the person in-universe writing it. And because it’s a journal, everything in it probably recently happened to him, so it’s not like he needs to remind himself. You can use this to ...


4

Your example is a bit extreme but in general: Highlight the successes as well as the failures. Try to express understanding and sympathy for how the failures might have occurred. For example perhaps you point out that something is a first effort, or the budget was a little low, or some other factor out of the control of the author/developer/filmmaker. ...


0

It may be difficult to add 'action' in that format since the journal author would be unlikely to want to write blow by blow accounts of events he has just experienced. For example if he gets into a fight, would he really want to go home and write it up like a thriller? Despite this you can certainly add tension, and even action in a roundabout way. You can ...


2

Surely, by definition, contradicting someone will cause hurt to that person (even if very small). However, pointing out that something contains malware is an obvious case where causing hurt to one party (the malware writers) is beneficial to the majority and therefore you should do it.


1

Rearrange your idea sequence or change the Point Of View (POV). For example, the friend comes to "the apartment", finding it empty or disheveled, but discovers the journal but not your protagonist. You're now set up for a mystery, perhaps a journey type novel, but the POV is that of the investigating friend. Perhaps the friend knows why the ...



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