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4

(I thought @what gave a great answer, which I upvoted, but it also made me want to look for counterexamples.) In Remains of the Day the main character is a repressed butler who devotes his life to providing exemplary service to a family that may not deserve his loyalty. In the process, he misses a shot at love with the family's housekeeper. The conflict ...


1

First, Imagine you are experiencing the same conflict as your character. Next, imagine that your mortal enemy (seriously, think of somebody you really dislike) wants to go with Option 1, which would naturally make you want to take up Option 2. The beauty of this is that you are not your character and thus do not have an opinion or a preference either way; ...


6

You seem to reduce inner conflict to "characters being pulled in two opposite directions". That is, a person who wants two different things, is "conflicted". We can imagine a person wanting both to lose weight and to eat a creamy cake to be conflicted in that manner. This is of course boring and not worth a novel. We can also imagine stronger, more tortuous ...


3

In real life, a person will always focus on one speaker at a time. This person may get distracted and switch his attention to another speaker while the first is still talking, but he is aware of this change of focus and it is marked for him by the sound of the voice, and maybe the face of the speaker, so it is never as confusing as unmarked written dialogue, ...


0

This is a little late to the party, but you haven't chosen an answer yet, so I'll give my opinion. On point 1: Why don't you try thinking of the dream sequence as a prologue? From your question, I'm not sure if you're writing a short story or a novel, so I don't know if a prologue is a viable option, but if not then just think of it as a detachment from ...


0

I agree 'freytag's pyramid' is most likely what he's asking for. The basic layout for this would be: 1:exposition 2:rising action 3:climax 4:falling action 5:dénouement. See Writing Drama: A Comprehensive Guide for Playwrights and Scriptwriters by Yves Lavandier.



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