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Successful example: Arthur C. Clarke's Rama series. The first book, Rendezvous with Rama, read to me like a history book written 50 years from now. Very hard sci-fi, technical, a bit dry. The next three in the series, written with Gentry Lee, are more typical fiction, and center on the adventures of one family who are (I think — it's been a while) ...


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I think the approach to this is to make what you write entertaining. Try to keep the style light, so you're not overwhelming the reader with facts. Use a steady build up, make the first few chapters skipable by someone who understands the field, but allows the layman to grasp the basics of where you're going. Keep the obvious stuff at the beginning, with ...


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I recommend you reading "Six Walks in the Fictional Woods" by Umberto Eco. He explains in the book such narratives (and many other aspects of either ommiting parts of information or stating it in achronological order). The short answer to you question is: yes, you obviously can do that. Just remember (as Monica Cellio commented) to clearly state that the ...


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It seems to me to mostly depend on your target audience. Scientists of this field will want full throttle facts, General scientific types will expect to be convinced by strong backable data Interested non-scientists may relate more to argument that make sense and are logical rather than specific proof, The general skeptic reader will not trust any ...


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Ditto MichaelB and LaurenIpsum. Other alternative: Find a way to introduce the monster first in a bland context. Like have the characters discuss the legends about this monster, describe it, etc. Then when the characters sees it, you just have to say "There was a frambar in the room!" Depending on how it's done, this may telegraph to the reader that the ...


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Same old worn joke. The humorous character did keep some running gag. A kind of jab at a younger partner, or some silly "ritual", or a funny one-liner reply. The reader is used to this joke, it was done at least twice in the story before, probably to a good humorous effect too (first time, sheer surprising humor, the other - a contextual humor that adds a ...


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I think Dexter(tv series) is a good example. Like in season 1 when he is about to kill a couple he asks them questions about their married life, so that he can use their suggestions for his life also. He is about to kill them but still is able to make the situation filled with some sense of dark humor without degrading the scene.


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The first time the character sees the monster, he's only going to get a few basic details. Christ, that thing is huge! It's green! and the teeth! After he's ducked out of the way and looked back over his shoulder, then he's going to notice the matted fur, the slitted yellow eyes, the cracked horns, the sulphurous breath, et cetera. So you describe it ...


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Considering that a paragraph is intended to convey a single self contained concept, trying to convey a description of the monster and his reaction is going to make it unwieldy. Imagine your reaction to entering that room, you're not going to pause your terror while you make a complete mental note of what it is and what it looks like. You're going to be ...


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Immediately after the humorous moment, do something that amplifies the emotion you want to emphasize.


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Make the joke relevant to the situation — this will stop the reader from being distracted by the humour of the joke, and keep the serious atmosphere. Even bad or very funny jokes can be used if the character delivers them correctly. And now some examples: In the Time Riders series by Alex Scarrow, when two pirates are about to hanged, one says to the ...


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Any time you drop a subtle hint, most readers will initially miss it. That's not necessarily a bad thing. It can be fun/gratifying for a reader to initially be blindsided by a development, only to realize that the clues were all there all along. Also, just as in life, we process a lot of information subconsciously. If you want a general sense of ...


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Your readers don't have to understand everything, They just have to understand enough that they are not unduly confused. It is alright to confuse your readers as long as they do not feel the story was confusing. If they think they know what is going on, but don't agree with each other, you may have written a masterpiece. For a good example let's look at Toy ...


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I think it very largely depends on what it is you are trying to convey. If John Smith not retrieving his card is a point that is an essential plot point, then you probably need to amplify it somewhere. If missing that fact alters the general flow of your story then it needs to be explained less subtly. "John Smith stuck his credit card into the machine, ...


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Do you want to be such a writer that spells out everything? Or do you want to write stories that make people think? I think you know the answer already. Please do not dumb down but write to the best of your ability! It is a difficult balance to find, and proof-readers will help you get there. Bear in mind that never ever you can serve everyone at once. ...


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In that example there aren't any clues to anything. It is uncommon for someone to walk away without retrieving his credit card, but there are no clues as to what this might mean. It is very likely that you make a mistake common to beginning writers: you know what you want to say, and therefore you know what your text is supposed to say, and you mistakenly ...


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You really should not go by Dickens. There are trends and fashions in writing, and what was en vogue two hundred years ago is not necessarily the best model for commercially successful writing today. If I look at contemporary writing, the predominant viewpoint changes with the category. More "high browed", literary fiction is often written in third person ...


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This is tricky, and it depends on your genre as well as how you want this character to be perceived by the reader. You could, for example, just describe the emotion: C1 was happy, a bird flew across the sky and C1 became indescribably sad. Weeping he spotted his shoelace and his tears became those of rage. Etc. This would work if you were in the comedy genre ...


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Just because a shift in expression or body language happens quickly doesn't mean you have to describe it quickly. You could expand the above to something more descriptive. For example: C1 doubled over cackling maniacally at the scene in front of him. The fires of hell had nothing on the carnage unfolding around him. His stance was relaxed, one knee on a ...


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When Socrates was about to drink hemlock, he asked, "May I pour out a libation to the gods?" And they told him "no", which is dark on another level. He had no respect for them or their pantheon, but they still took everything so seriously. After all, Socrates was dying because of their faith and their unwillingness to tolerate skepticism. You may be wrong ...


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Like anything else, it won't work if you try to graft it on at the last moment. It has to be true to the character and situation to not break your reader's suspension of disbelief. Making jokes in serious or tragic situations happens in real life all the time, so it can read as real if it's really something your character would do. But if not, it's going ...


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Gallows humor, in my experience, can be greatly assisted by the word wry. This can be used to indicate that the character is aware of the gravity of the situation but is still making a joke. For example: The executioner asked, "Any last words?" Alex smiled wryly and replied, [some joke] Something else you can do is just not make the joke too silly or ...



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