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It's called foreshadowing and it's common in fiction. Sometimes the future events are just hinted at or suggested (for example, the gun described in the first chapter later becomes the murder weapon), other times they are explicitly spelled out (as in your example). If the book has a first person narrator, you would usually only see explicit foreshadowing ...


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Here's a link to a great site of apology letter templates: http://www.apologyletters.net/ Just take one that piques your interest and change it according to your situation. If you want to do it step by step: http://www.wikihow.com/Write-an-Apology-Letter Though. He's your friend. I don't think you have to be so formal about not being able to attend his ...


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Read Percy Jackson seriously so many cryptic prophecys like seriously inspiration that's how I did it XD.


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Don't overreach. Phrases such as "I did. Not. Move." come off as a bit much, a bit dramatic. And I agree w/ the top answer, it does get a bit didactic towards the end. Illustrate inner conflict with outer actions; as a general rule, tend away from explicitly indicating the character's mindset. Of course there are cases where you must, but don't unless you've ...


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Remember, the goal is not to feel emotion, and not to write emotion. The goal is to write so the reader feels emotion. At the risk of being terminally cheesy, consider these lyrics from 90's pop group Roxette (reformatted as prose): What's the time? Seems it's already morning. I see the sky, it's so beautiful and blue. The TV's on, but the only thing ...


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A few things I notice are your change of tense and POV. It is not consistent. You switch at the end from "I" to "you" and feels like your preaching to your reader. You have a lot of Filter Words. Saw, felt,feel, realized, watch, etc... These words naturally put up another layer between the character and the reader. Try rewriting without these. Passive ...


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Character difference is relative. Two spies are almost certainly more like one another than a spy and a nun, but that doesn't mean you can't write a book about two spies. They entered the service for the same reason, and they feel the same way about their job. Just take all the similarities as your baseline, and figure out how they differ when you take the ...


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Importance for what? For success? If so how is that measure? Are you referring to becoming a NY time best seller? I'll assume you are. Look at authors like George RR Martin or JK Rowling or Stephanie Meyer or EL James or christopher Paolini . Some of them write great, others, not so much. Yet they all have sold massive amounts of books. JK Rowling has a ...


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Formal education beyond the basic education you would get in school in a developed country is not particularly useful, in my opinion, unless you want to write in a very literary style. In that case, a English Literature degree or something similar may be modestly useful. Beyond basic literacy at the level you can get in a good school, you're really better ...


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Since you can only write convincingly and engagingly about things that you know, experience and knowledge are invaluable for any author. You an make up a lot, of course, but only if you understand the principles behind what you are making up. For example, you can make up how a certain person behaves, but only if you understand how people behave in general ...


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There are nearly an infinite amount of ways to differentiate these characters. What you have described are easily observable traits such as physical looks, and their basic beliefs. What you are missing is what makes these people appear real, and not just two dimensional characters that are born on X date and died on Y date. Find out more about their home ...


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I was reminded of the story of twin brothers, who "had entirely different tastes in women." They may do many of the same things, but go about them differently. One may be "spiritual, the other non-religious. They may have different intellectual gifts, one may be better with words, the other with numbers. One may be nicer, or at least more sincere than the ...


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This site is fantastic, and I think it'll give you the answers you are looking for. http://www.caroclarke.com/transitions.html


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Well, it's not purely historical fiction, if it's also science fiction. And even in historical fiction, the word "fiction" has a role to play in the final result. I'd say you probably want to focus on the role these characters are playing not in history, but in your book. If they are truly indistinguishable - they have the same opinions, same knowledge, ...


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Make their similarity a theme in your narration. These people are friends and work together because they are so similar. It is enough that you clearly identify them by name, profession and life circumstances (live at different place, have different family, etc.), but don't destroy the driving factor of that relationship. Rather, have the narrator, or even ...


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Give them a physical difference. Something to visualize the contrast binds the concept of the character to the visual part of the brain. I personally am a fan of facial hair for this particular case as it is visual memorable, capable of great variation and in most cases insignificant to the plot or the character. if one has a mustache and the other does not ...



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