New answers tagged

1

There really is no convention for indicating the end of things in text. You are asking for a way to move up the hierarchy of the document without a title to indicate the change. There really isn't a reliable way to indicate that to a reader. Titles indicate the beginning of things not the end of things. What there is a convention for is creating a ...


0

Indentations. 1.1 Main section (starting) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet 1.1.1 Sub section 1 Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet 1.1.2 Sub section 2 Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet 1.1.1.a. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet 1.1 Main section (ending) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet This makes it very easy to follow. Granted, if you have too many subsections you're ...


0

This might depend on your field (or department/school/institution guidelines), but at least I simply insert the epilogue (because that's what it is) at the end of the last subsection. If your writing is coherent enough, it shows. For instance: 1. Main section ... In chapter 1 I will talk about a, b, c, because of this and that, and it's important because, ...


1

While this isn't exactly for requirements management within Microsoft Word, my company, QRA Corp, has launched QVscribe - a plugin for Microsoft Word that identifies and analyzes requirements to help ensure they are clear and unambiguous. QVscribe analyzes requirements based on best practices from organizations like NASA and INCOSE to flag potential issues ...


2

I think you need to join them into a single step, or else there is a risk that the user will do the first step without paying attention to the indicator arm, and may thus hold the input vane open too long. And I presume that there is a third step here, which is to close the input vane when the indicator arm reaches the set value. You definitely need to ...


6

Rule #1 in technical documentation is: don't mislead the reader. If the command or function name begins with a lowercase letter, capitalizing it is an error -- it's not "Cat" but "cat". The Microsoft Manual of Style specifies that literal elements like this should be written with their correct case. It also calls for using text styling to offset them, as ...


4

The GNU site itself treats the name of the Make utility as an uppercased word: https://www.gnu.org/software/make/ There does seem to be a convention to frequently use make (the command) where Make (the name) would seem more appropriate. The GNU Make manual seems to do this almost exclusively (https://www.gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html) but always ...


2

You can cast it as an early report on your beta launch, or as a preview of your forthcoming launch. Assuming that you're restricting it now so you can work the kinks out before spreading more widely, it helps to also talk about what you've learned -- we found and fixed this performance problem at scale, we discovered that this one part of our user interface ...


1

I would say that the newest, and in my view most promising, trend in in the use of lightweight markup languages, specifically Markdown, reStructuredText, and ASCIIDoc. Both commercial WYSIWYG tools like FrameMaker and XML vocabularies like DocBook and DITA require complex and somewhat cumbersome editors and tend to clutter the writing experience with ...


0

It all comes down to the familiarity of the audience with the interface. The words of a procedure describe parts of the interface. Will the audience immediately recognize which parts of the interface those words refer to? If yes, then screenshots are unnecessary and will simply slow the reader down. If no, then you need a way to show the reader which part of ...


1

Maybe this will work. Approximately 70% of small businesses in the United States struggle to hire qualified employees. Almost 50% of those small businesses cite lack of skills of potential employees as the reason jobs go unfilled. Filling those jobs with appropriately trained candidates is our focus.



Top 50 recent answers are included