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6

Consider incorporating your fine print into the body of the article. Nothing in your Fine Print section requires any special understanding of the science involved, or even a good understanding of how science proceeds. As a bonus: If you do that, you can drop the opening part of that section, which is about you, and not about the topic. If the authors' ...


4

Instead of "fiction" (made up) and "non-fiction" (facts) I'll use the terms "novel" and "textbook". We expect a novel, both fiction and non-fiction, to be about experience and possibly ideas, and textbooks to be about detailed information. But there are countless counter examples. For example the scholarly field of ethnology often employs first person ...


4

Don't Minimize the uncertainty, celebrate it! Sensational science reporting does not worry about details just bold headlines: 'Cell Phones Cause Breast Cancer!' Responsible reporting hedges their bets: 'Link between Cell phone usage and Breast Cancer Found.' Great reporting shows what the details mean: 'Developed nations have more cell phones and breast ...


3

There's nothing confusing about the paragraph you have at the end. Given the replication rates for correlation-based studies, there no reason for the reader to believe that the study established a new insight into the effects of trans fats. A layperson shouldn't base his idea of the effect of trans fats on a single correlational study based on self ...


3

I would say write what you are capable of. If your talents are non-fiction, straight to the point works then definitely write it that way. But if you are very skilled at writing fiction stories detailing adventures or thought-provoking ideas, then do that. Personally, I would write a fiction novel detailing all the technical experience of advanced diving ...


2

It seems to me to mostly depend on your target audience. Scientists of this field will want full throttle facts, General scientific types will expect to be convinced by strong backable data Interested non-scientists may relate more to argument that make sense and are logical rather than specific proof, The general skeptic reader will not trust any ...


1

I think the approach to this is to make what you write entertaining. Try to keep the style light, so you're not overwhelming the reader with facts. Use a steady build up, make the first few chapters skipable by someone who understands the field, but allows the layman to grasp the basics of where you're going. Keep the obvious stuff at the beginning, with ...


1

You're talking about two very different kinds of book. In a way this is like asking, "I'm going to college. Should I major in chemistry or poetry?" That all depends on what you like, what you're good at, and what you expect to do with the degree. Someone could list the pros and cons of each, but without knowing your wants and needs and aptitudes, there's no ...


1

There's no need to choose. Write both.


1

Is it better to write that as a non-fiction book or develop a novel on the subject? With one huge exception, my general answer would be that you should write a straightforward instructional book. Most novels I have read that simply wrapped a story round a lesson read like books for children. That annoys me. I'm a grown up. I don't need the pill sugared. Now ...


1

You have to target your writing to the background of the reader. "Correlation does not prove causation" is a well-known slogan in scientific and statistical circles, so if you were writing for such technical people, just quoting the phrase should be sufficient to make the point. But if your writing for the ordinary layman, the odds are that they are NOT ...


1

It all depends. Size doesn't matter so much as what you do with it. ;) In my experience, what's been important is that the technical document serves the need of people in the organization to communicate, so that rather than asking a person to explain something, one can just look at the document. If that process is not happening as needed, or not happening ...


1

"Content testing" typically refers to the practice of testing whether or not your content is suitable for the audience in question, and whether or not they can understand and comprehend it. I believe it is more geared to internet-based content, but content testing is applicable to marketing, advertising, non-fiction, and probably even fiction - just about ...



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