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3

I think you've mistitled your question. The real question is not How many chapters should I have?, but rather How long should my chapters be? Four chapters in six pages is probably not the right way to go. Generally, in modern books a chapter runs between 2,000-6,000 words (10-30 typewritten pages in manuscript format), which is roughly the same length as a ...


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If you want to look up by both title and date, I'd list each entry as: [Entry title] [Entry date] [Page Number] where "Page Number" refers to your existing 2-page numbering. You'll have no trouble finding the entry you're looking for once you've opened up the right 2 pages...


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It's often a matter of house style, if you are working with a publisher, and the style can vary within the same publisher, depending on the series. I've written many books for Peachpit Press, and they have two popular series with different styles. For example, imagine you were writing a book on PowerPoint (as I have). In their Visual QuickStart Guide series, ...


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The choice between Continuous/Progressive form and Imperative form is one of style. Choose one form and use it consistently. In my experience, I've heard plenty of strongly held opinions about which is correct, but seen no convincing evidence that it makes any difference. I can't back this up, but if you have a significant audience of non-native English ...


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Adapt multiple levels of division. What I see as the worst problem is abusing chapters as sections. Get your wife to adapt * ~ * ~ * section breaks with the current frequency of chapters, use chapters much more sparsely, possibly name each, and if that isn't enough, divide the whole thing into 2-4 parts. The division into parts is clear, memorable and ...


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Sure. The key question is, How many entries would such a Table of Contents have, and how big is the newsletter? If the answer is, "one, because each issue of the newsletter is pretty much just one article", then clearly there's little point. But if the answer is "twenty", then it makes sense. Likewise if the newsletter is a single sheet of paper, then ...


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If your publication contains enough identifiable discrete units of content, then it is valid (and desirable) to provide a Table of Contents to aid readers. On the other hand, if your document template includes a place-holder for a ToC but you are struggling to find what to put in it, then it may be time to change the template. If the Table of Contents is ...


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I like "Create a Cluster." If I'm actually RTFM, I'm usually looking for instructions on how to do something. Well, what do I want to do? I want to Create a Cluster — so that's what I'm going to look for. (That said, I don't mind the -ing form either.) "Cluster creation" seems unnecessarily passive to me.



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