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19

I am not a lawyer. The observations below apply in the US, I don't know much about international copyright law outside the specific area of software copyrights. Here in the US, if you wrote something, you own the copyright on it, period. All you need in order to assert that copyright is proof that you wrote something, and when. There are many ways to do ...


15

A significant proportion of agents and editors still want submissions in Standard Manuscript Format, which includes using a serif monospace font such as Courier. Many of them have become less fussy about the particular font and will also accept a proportional font such as Times Roman. However, in no case should you use a non-serif font, or anything that you ...


12

For tracking short stories and direct submissions to publishers, use Duotrope, a free online tool that contains every market you've ever heard of and a multitude that you haven't, complete with submission history, links to websites, etc. Also, be sure to donate to them, because they deserve it. For tracking agent queries, use Query Tracker, which has a ...


10

When I was doing work as an Editor I loved the Courier font, or any fixed pitch font for that matter. As nice as Times New Roman looks, after reading 100+ first pages it starts to wear on the eyes. A fixed pitch font just makes it easier to read page after page and in the end readability wins when it comes to formatting and fonts. But as for what an editor ...


9

I'm afraid I've never seen any statistics on this. As the comments have noted, this is a very difficult estimate to make - there are many different definitions of "getting published" (does self-publishing count? e-Publishing? Vanity? Short stories? Posthumously?), and it's practically impossible to track the many, many writers who never got past the ...


8

It depends on the magazine. Many publications have submission guidelines, and you might check those for what anything required in the cover letter. I found an interesting variety of requests with a few minutes of googling. Asimov's Science-Fiction is clear on what they want: Your cover letter should contain the length of your story, your publishing ...


5

How less well regarded are they? Unless your previous publication experience consists of "Dear Penthouse: I never thought this could happen to me..." then I would leave the bulk of your experience in place. That being said, if you have extensive publication experience I would prioritize the more prominent publications first, keeping it to about 5. The time ...


5

As someone that's submitted papers to scientific journals I can say that the feedback I received was no, in the case of a scientific paper, it isn't detrimental. It also doesn't help at all, as science papers are judged on their merits alone, ostensibly, but I've always gotten the impression that the editors are more likely to take an entry from someone ...


5

Two tips for submissions (no matter how short the story is): Write just a letter/email and ask for permission to send them your story. In this letter (like in every cover letter) you should describe your story and yourself shortly and you should put in there, why they should publish your story. Why is it fantastic? Why do people really want to read it? ...


5

I went to their about page, and that pointed to socialwrite.gather.com, which says: Payment Socialwriters are paid in the following ways: Per Article: $2.50-$10 for any articles posted on Gather that receive a minimum of 250 unique page views AND Monthly Bonus: $25-$100 based on the popularity of their writing throughout the month ...


4

What are the legal issues when submitting work to publishers? Your work must be your work. Don't submit anything that someone else has written, not even if you just copied a few sentences. Even if you changed them. There are companies out there that can run automated checks on your work to see if they can find something in it that even remotely looks ...


4

It's absolutely possible. If you already have a good idea of the publishers you would like to work with, check their web sites for submission information. If not, try subscribing to something like Writer's Market to get the info. Do be aware that some publishing houses shy away from publishing international authors because they aren't sure how to parse ...


4

To expand somewhat on the great information that @Standback provided, you have to keep in mind that the numbers you found pertaining to business success is in itself an incomplete number. The government statistics are based on those businesses that are actually documented as a result of completing some type of government form, such as a business permit or ...


4

When I edit MSS, I find it easy and natural to work on copy that's 'typed' in Courier and double spaced. Another fixed-pitch font might be OK, I guess, but Courier is by far the most familiar and the easiest to edit, AFAIAC. It's impossible to edit matter set in a variable-spaced font;1 there's just not enough room2 to insert proofreaders' marks quickly and ...


3

For each story I have a spreadsheet set up that not only has the usual information about a story (Word count, summery and the like) but also information about all my submissions, including: What magazine it was sent to The editor at the time When it was sent out When it came back What the results were Any notes about the submission It's not fancy, but it ...


3

I've been an on-again, off-again writer for Ars Technica for nearly ten years. (Mostly off for the last four.) Periodically, they solicit submissions from new writers, usually in a few specific subject areas. I don't know that video games is one of them, because Ben, Casey, and Andrew seem to have that on lockdown both in terms of volume and quality. And ...


3

If they want the information in the synopsis, then put it there. I also see no problem mentioning it in the cover letter additionally, but you don't need it there when it is in the synopsis. If you do not have a writing career (yet), then your age (or date of birth) and current profession should be sufficient. Tell them, why you are in expert for children's ...


3

The magazine is most interested in the legal situation. So you should mention if the offeror (probably your friend) holds all necessary rights of the translation (made by you). Also it should be clear that the story is not licensed in its original version in a way that would make it impossible for the magazine to publish it (like: a different publisher ...


2

One method I heard of to protect yourself is to mail yourself a copy of your work before you submit it. That way you can have a sealed and postmarked copy of your work in case of plagiarism. I am not sure if this also applies to digital media but archiving a copy of any emails sent out containing your work might be a good idea.


2

I use a combination of: Sonar 3 (a submission tracking tool); and Tagging submitted files in a Subversion repository Sonar 3 is a nice little desktop app that let's you define stories, markets, and create "submissions". Each submission links a story to the market it was sent to, records responses from editors, acceptances/rejections, and allows some ...


2

I am not a lawyer, my post comes from my experience working in the publishing world. It's also only what I know of the US copyright laws, not any international ones. Purchasing a copyright isn't required. You own the copyright to your work, no matter what. The "poor man's copyright" (mailing yourself a seal copy of the manuscript) is no longer a valid way ...


2

While an answer has already been selected, I wanted to add some further points. In the US, you must have registered your copyright to begin an infringement lawsuit. You can register your copyright either before or after the date of infringement. However, registering copyright before an infringement provides for additional benefits not available when ...


2

In the U.S. and other Berne Convention signatories, you own the copyright in a creative work as soon as it is fixed in a tangible form (e.g., a computer file). You do not need to register to have a valid copyright. However, you do need to register before you can file suit against someone for copyright infringement. You do not need to have registered before ...


2

Each agent and publisher will have their own submission guidelines, and many do accept electronic submissions. I don't know of any, however, who will take phone calls from new authors who have never been published. You'll most likely end up with a message left with a receptionist somewhere. I would recommend starting out with agents by sending a link to ...


2

As a general rule-of-thumb, "hitting the Enter key twice" is never the correct answer to any question about formatting text in a word processor. That action does not add a line space after the current paragraph, it creates an additional (empty) paragraph. If your workflow (or that of your publisher) carries out any automated task on each paragraph, those ...


2

Unless you already have a completed manuscript, you are putting the cart before the horse. If you intend to use an agent, you'll need to see what that agent requires, which is usually a query--outline, sample chapter, synopsis, and so on. Most agents (and publishers) no longer need or want the manuscript in paper format. Each has differing requirements ...


1

It’s hard to give a useful answer to this question, because the vast majority of work submitted for publication is really, really awful. One editor has a “rough breakdown of manuscript characteristics, from most to least obvious rejections” here (scroll down to the numbered list). If you can write a story that is engaging to any reader who is not a close ...


1

First step: check the publisher's web site for their specific submission guidelines! They probably say right there how they want to receive your manuscript.


1

Before you start querying, you must, must, must familiarize yourself with submission guidelines - for the field in general, and for the specific agents and publishers you find are appropriate for you to query. With the strategy you suggest, you're running smack into two common guidelines. And even if your case, for whatever reason, is so exceptional that ...


1

For reading purposes, stick to a good, well-known serif font (like Times New Roman), or slab serif font (like Courier). The reason I say this is because - regardless of your manuscript looking like it was written with a typewriter font - serif fonts are much easier to read in print than sans-serif fonts (like Arial). On a writing course I've done, they ...



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