Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Repetition gives emphasis whatever is repeated. Repetition calls attention to whatever is repeated, especially if the repeated thing is unusual or interesting. Repetition can create rhythms. Repeated patterns can provoke expectations in the reader. For an extreme, haunting, brilliant example of repetition, see Rick Moody's story "Boys" (PDF).


1

I don't honestly see a problem with the two later examples. You have repeated words ("mind" and "pissed off") because you're talking about the same things/emotions multiple times. The only problem with the birthday example is that nobody talks like that. If you wrote "You forgot my birthday!" I said. "I did not! I would never forget your birthday!" ...


2

Words or phrases should not be repeated within the space of a couple of lines (except for small common words like 'the') unless you are doing it for effect, for example: "No. No. No. A thousand times no." The difficulty is judging when it works and when it doesn't. One way to see is to read it out loud.


0

Successful example: Arthur C. Clarke's Rama series. The first book, Rendezvous with Rama, read to me like a history book written 50 years from now. Very hard sci-fi, technical, a bit dry. The next three in the series, written with Gentry Lee, are more typical fiction, and center on the adventures of one family who are (I think — it's been a while) ...


2

I think the approach to this is to make what you write entertaining. Try to keep the style light, so you're not overwhelming the reader with facts. Use a steady build up, make the first few chapters skipable by someone who understands the field, but allows the layman to grasp the basics of where you're going. Keep the obvious stuff at the beginning, with ...


5

What you describe is mostly what the genre of High Fantasy is about. I have never found Le Guin or Tolkien to be archaic, or “dated”, it reads natural to me. I have more issues with Zelasny’s Princes of Amber series, or Moorcock's series, though. Also some fantasy authors try to inject artificial “old style” and that is glaring and distracting to the ...


1

I would say that if you enjoy that, and you want to include it into your work then you should do so. I think the 'harmful extent' comes when it is over used, or it interferes with the flow of the story. But that is something that can be fixed in future edits. If you are having conversations in some alternate language then provide some means of allowing ...


3

It seems to me to mostly depend on your target audience. Scientists of this field will want full throttle facts, General scientific types will expect to be convinced by strong backable data Interested non-scientists may relate more to argument that make sense and are logical rather than specific proof, The general skeptic reader will not trust any ...


3

Consider how your reader will use the book. In an academic work (which this is not), readers: are likely to already be familiar with the cited works (they're also researchers in this field, after all) will rely on the works you cite to evaluate your work (they care about those citations) read lots of such articles and welcome a consistent style ...


2

According to this Pitts Theology Library Research Guide, The two styles most commonly used in theology are SBL and Chicago style. It is important to note that SBL style suggests that users check the Chicago Manual if a question is not specifically answered in the SBL Handbook. SBL Handbook of Style: For Ancient Near Eastern, Biblical, and Early ...


1

"The openings of my novels seem fine. This may be because they are generally only one scene long. But it may also be because I develop them differently than the rest of the plot." In that case, treat each scene as the "opening" of the rest of the novel. Develop it as you would develop the real opening, rather than the "rest of the plot." That way, your ...


2

Most Modern Christian works use footnotes except for scripture which is always cited inline. Early works which predate modern citation styles use the author's name or the common identifier for a work when an author was known for more than one work, as many works had no titles, page numbers or publishers in a narrative citation style (the citation, what there ...


1

You can use Lauren's method to develop your plot, but I wouldn't advise you to write backwards. In my opinion you should always write every text in the order that it will be read. As you progress from one part to the next you will automatically create transitions from one part to the next, because that is how the mind works. If you work backwards, you'll ...


1

Sequence is all and well, but don't forget your character development. And while we are at it remember that in the real world, everyone in the star of their own story. So you have the order of events, but if the story is that simple, it is just a tale. Remember Eddie will put rabbit ears on anybody whenever there is a camera pointed at them, and Bob used to ...


0

You have all your parts; you've sort of discovered your story backwards. Now you need to reverse–reverse-engineer an outline. A very rough skeleton for an outline is: Intro: set up the story world Act I: Plot is set in motion. Ends with a disaster or reversal Act II: Reversal is overcome. Plot moves forward. Ends with another disaster or reversal. ...


2

It sounds as if your story progresses in a series of "this happens and then that happens" scenes. I think the key is to focus on cause and effect. This happens, and therefore that happens. Take a closer look at Lauren's awesome "plotting backwards" answer that you cite. Every single one of her prompt questions is about cause and effect. Edited to add: I ...


1

As with anything, it depends upon your intended audience. The term would be quite out-of-place in a street conversation, unless you were mocking a concept in the company of friends. For people that are well-read, particularly those having read a fair amount of classical philosophy and participated in discussion, they would be more inclined to use and ...


1

In some cases, "corresponding" could be replaced by noun or adjective which helps identify the context. For example: If the context relies on a single anchor (Self, Parent, Following), the nodes within that scope are treated according to this context and an anchoring node is created in the output XML file. In this example, "that scope" refers back to ...


0

Try "related", "similar" or "same". If the context relies on a single anchor (Self, Parent, Following), the nodes within the related scope are treated with regard to this context and a corresponding node is created in the output XML file. edit: also, what do you mean by "the nodes ... are treated with regard to this context"? Do you mean the ...


1

No, you do not have to keep calling the character by his or her full name. It would make it very awkward to have to read "Ted Dibar does this", "Ted Dibar does that", all the way through the script. Go ahead and call him Ted in the action lines. Or TED when it's formatted above dialogue. And read scripts. They're all over the web (e.g., the mother-lode of ...


0

For a screenplay it is standard to use present tense, and to use simple present in most cases. It makes the action more immediate. So, instead of "are watching" you'd just say that they "watch". Or they gawk, or scan or consider or stare at -- whatever makes sense. Use very specific nouns and verbs. Every word counts. You don't have many to work with. So, ...


1

There is a three part solution to your problem: Format -- there are some standard forms for business communication. A lot of what makes any communication seem more polite is just the inclusion of some standard niceties (please, thank you, etc) that can basically be cut and pasted from one email to the next. You should easily be able to find some books or ...


0

I feel a very good and simple way to start is a scratch pad. Hard to express is generally associated with difficulty in forming sentences which convey the intended thought. We always have the basic words ready, but the sentences is what the problem is. Just write whatever comes in your mind. Words or sentences or pictures whatever it may be. First put all ...


4

You can try to "rubber duck". Explain what you need to convey out loud to someone not in the know or even to a rubber ducky from the bathtub. Then write it down. When still unsure, wait a day and read it back to see if the text still makes sense. Keep at it, talk about it, it is a learn-able skill!


0

In the Bibliography: Turbo. (2012). Turbo quick take: Bridging the gender gap. New York: Turbo. Available online at http://www.whereveryoufoundit.com/path/to/document.pdf In text: (Turbo, 2012, p. 7) Google for the Purdue Online Writing Lab, or pick up a copy of the APA Manual at your local public library.


1

Quote from Chekhov: “It seems to me that when you write a short story, you have to cut off both the beginning and the end. We writers do most of our lying in those spaces. You must write shorter, to make it as short as possible.” If you read most of Chekhov's stories, you'll probably find this is true. There's an essay that can answer all your questions ...


2

Books today no longer begin "once upon a time..." there was such and such a hero, and such and such a heroine. So you do not want mostly "background" in your opening paragraph. Instead, I was taught to "begin the story in the middle of the action." An example is the opening of my Revolutionary War novel. "Outside a log cabin on the banks of the Pee Dee ...


0

For a work by two authors, you either name both authors in the single phrase, or in the parentheses each time you make reference to the work. For example: Foo and Bar (1994) note that the world did not end. The world did not end (Foo and Bar, 1994). For a work by three to five authors (which is what applies to your example), list all five names ...


3

I won't buy a book without one. When I browse a bookstore, I look at all the titles on the spine. Only if the title intrigues me or implies a story that might interest me, do I pull the book out far enough to view the cover. I don't judge the cover image, but I use it and any text on it to get a first rough idea of what the book is about. If this interests ...


4

General Observations As others have observed, preserving the illusion is not so much a matter of inserting expressions and details as keeping jarring anachronistic expressions and details out. It is important not to use words and expression which were invented later or were so little known in the 1950's that your readers would think they were invented ...


0

This is tricky, and it depends on your genre as well as how you want this character to be perceived by the reader. You could, for example, just describe the emotion: C1 was happy, a bird flew across the sky and C1 became indescribably sad. Weeping he spotted his shoelace and his tears became those of rage. Etc. This would work if you were in the comedy genre ...


1

Without getting into social commentary, it seems to me that it's practically impossible to talk about the life of a transgendered person without getting into the sort of paradoxical or at least confusing statements that you describe. If you say "Caitlyn Jenner ... she won a gold medal in the men's decathlon ...", this creates the pretty obvious anomaly of ...


2

My immediate thought is that you don't need to shepherd the reader, people are aware of the concept of transgender, we live in a society that is open enough to be able to have conversations about that. My personal approach would be to simply respect the gender that the person attached to themselves at those times. If you're talking about a scene in the ...


1

The most important thing you need to establish is a consistency of approach. Decide on a way to introduce a voice, reinforce it a couple of times and then get on with writing. The important part here is showing the reader what you're conveying, rather than blindly sticking to prescribed style. (if every writer always stuck to the prescribed style, there ...


0

This is an excerpt from my answer at Direct thoughts I have gone through the contemporary English language fiction I own and have found that in the vast majority of novels the thoughts of the protagonist are printed in roman type (not italicized), while outside voices the protagonist hears in his head are printed in italics. Examples: Use italics for: ...


2

Using first person might work best for a situation like this. You'd be able to easily convey inner thoughts, use quotation marks for strictly dialog, and have the option to format intruding other "inner" voices differently... As I approached the burnt-out shell of the stone building, I thought it looked like the fires of hell had consumed it. You don't ...


3

Just because a shift in expression or body language happens quickly doesn't mean you have to describe it quickly. You could expand the above to something more descriptive. For example: C1 doubled over cackling maniacally at the scene in front of him. The fires of hell had nothing on the carnage unfolding around him. His stance was relaxed, one knee on a ...


0

IMO: A script is verbal language only. It's WHAT is said. The screenplay is HOW the script is said. It's all the things that lend to how a script plays out on screen, from location to mood to staging and lighting.



Top 50 recent answers are included