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2

I would go with the following. It is possible for God to "[desire] all people to be saved." To me, this suggests that the original quote clearly implied the word desire; a rephrasing like It is possible for God to desire "all people to be saved." leaves more ambiguity.


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You could use empty brackets with a space between them. Brackets are generally used to alter a quote inline, such as fixing grammar or to add information like a name so the quoted material will work within the context of the piece quoting it. "desire[ ] all people to be saved" or don't quote that word: It is possible for God to want "all people to ...


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I'm surprised that you chose BESW's answer which only gives you an example for how to cite a video game, but does not actually explain what you asked for, namely citing events in a video game. I'll try to answer that. To refer to a specific plot element of a video game in a scholarly paper, you need to first identify the structure of the game. Usually ...


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There is no such thing as "vividly descriptive writing". There is, of course, "incredibly annoying amateur writing with lots of extraneous adjectives strung together". When I read amateur manuscripts it is invariably a face palm. What I need to do is write software that can automatically recognize, target and delete adjectives. That would be very useful. ...


1

The primary difference between usage in the terms "screenplay" and "script" is the function of the document. The script the actors use during filming is primarily dialogue with minimal stage direction. This is similar to the 'spec scripts' given to agents and producers to generate interest in the work. The primary focus here is on telling the story, the ...


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Cite the game according to your style guide's format, and provide any more specific context you feel is necessary as part of the lead-in and text surrounding the quote or reference. The Traveller's sudden incarceration on his first arrival in the 233rd Age parallels the Traveller's arrival in Riven: an automated trap is sprung and the Traveller forced to ...


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It's miss understands. Script is a complete version but screenplay is more importence gave the dialog part of the scene


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I just rewrote your answer with more complicated words and combined a few sentences and now it seems to sound better. I also made the prompts look less like dialogue and more like prompts. Additionally, I dissolved the "(life lessons)" into the sentence it is concerning. Try to recall memories from your youth, and write them down as you remember them for ...


1

Names generally have spaces between the initials because they are representing two names, but that's a matter of personal preference. k.d. lang uses periods but not spaces or capitals. e e cummings used spaces but not periods or capitals. J. K. Rowling uses all three. P.S. and U.S.A. are abbreviations (I have often seen USA with no periods), and always ...


3

If this were a question about usage in a technical paper or an essay, I'd suggest referring to a style manual for guidance. However, outside of formatting and punctuation rules, I don't think there are any absolute rules for fiction. Narrative writing is meant to show people in real world believably, and people don't always use exactly the same terms for ...


5

If it's important enough to mention the hour then it's important enough to be clear which one you mean, but using "AM" and "PM" in fiction may not be the best way. If the scene already makes it clear which one is being talked about -- on the beach you talk about the sunlight dancing off the waves, for instance -- then you don't need to say anything and "PM" ...


6

Those (and dialogue) are all quotations. The first might be quoting Sophia or an unnamed sarcastic commentator or someone else. The second quotes Genesis. The third quotes the character's anthropomorphized common sense. All quotations. So punctuate them like other quotations.


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OK, I finally seem to have found a concrete mandate on this issue after digging a little deeper. Not sure if I should reference my source as a valid one since it's definitely not official but I'll let the readers be the judge. Here's the link: Quotation Marks: Where Do the Commas and Periods Go--and Why? To quote the article, universal American usage places ...


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I see no reason why you'd treat the punctuation/quote convention any differently for a single letter than for a paragraph. The interaction of punctuation and quote has to do with white space and clarity of content, not the volume of what comes before those two characters.


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It seems to me that there is only way you can create "purple prose". The term itself seems less like an actual definition then words a pundit invented to describe something he recommends for or against. In this case, he is simply recommending that you avoid a certain type of prose that reads as boring. Is my interpretation at least. edit: to answer your ...


3

Sometimes purple prose is an attempt to impress the reader with how smart the author is. I work in the software business and I have to do a fair amount of technical writing. And I've very routinely found that if I write something that is simple, clear, and direct, someone else in the company will edit it to make it less easy to read. I recall one time that ...


0

This depends purely on the writing style you are going for. In general, it is usually a good idea to avoid superfluous descriptions of things which have no bearing on the actual story. You should give the reader just enough information to understand what is going on. For example, if you are in someone's home, you wouldn't describe each and every object in ...


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For American English, Strunk & White or Garner's MAU. For British English, Fowler (updated edition) or style guides from the Guardian, Economist or BBC. Source: http://xkcd.com/923/ (image licensed CC BY-NC 2.5) See also: 'Style guide' @ Wikipedia (scroll down for a big list)


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A world building genre like fantasy and science fiction will often benefit from generally longer, more descriptive sentences (up to a few lines long), whereas more "down to Earth" genres like drama might benefit from less. That being said, it greatly depends on the expectations and style of the narrative being told. You might write sentences no longer than ...


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One of the characteristics of the kind of prose you are referring to is a very dull and dry approach, there is often quite unnecessary pompous savant words and an obtuse language, there is also a general miasma of boredomness and triteness, a sure way to spot the culprits in an entirely wholesome and objective way is the length of the sentences used which ...


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Written dialogue is a good indicator of the overall quality of the story. Each character should have their own unique voice. For example, a poorly educated laborer is going to have a much different speaking style than a college educated banker. A child is going to also be much more naïve than an adult. It is more difficult to have believable dialogue coming ...


2

My rule of thumb comes from Elmore Leonard: "If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it." To me, this means that, as a reader, I'm experiencing the story, and not the writing. This might seem vague, but it helps me avoid writerly cliches and too much incidental blah-blah that distracts from the story.


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I would lean towards showing ownership through the use of its. They are both attributes of the river and cottage mentioned. Where you might use "the" is in the same sentence, like these examples: The waters of the river were calm as I gazed at them, stretching into the distance until they reached the city. The interior of the cottage showed none of ...


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Determining how much, and what information you pass through your sentences is a very important subliminal channel of information about the speaker, their character, current situation and mood. If you merely use it to optimize readability, you will crop a lot of flavour of the text just in order to pass verbatim data. It's like you took a painting and tried ...


2

"How much information" does not lend itself to quantification. That aside, readability is not a function only of the amount of information compressed into a given sentence. Factors include the writing style, the particular scene, the pace of the story at the time the sentence is written, the surrounding text, the nature of the event (brief or elongated), ...


2

Well, of course this is a bit subjective, because there is always someone who likes a particular style. Although, it may only be the author's mother. :D However, if you are interested in common expectations in the publication world, then you most likely want to check out a book like the wonderful The First 5 Pages, by Noah Lukeman -- amazon.com link. ...


1

The main one I'm aware of is that King often uses which to introduce a restrictive clause. Grammatical purists reserve which for nonrestrictive ones, and introduce restrictive clauses with that.


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Here's the dictionary.com definition of poem: a composition in verse, especially one that is characterized by a highly developed artistic form and by the use of heightened language and rhythm to express an intensely imaginative interpretation of the subject. The problem, which everyone is indicating with their answers is the portion that states: ...


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Ah the eternal question in all art forms. What is music? So John Cage created 4'33" What is dance? So someone I forget who, possibly Merce Cunningham, stepped on stage and didn't move, and then left. What is a painting? So many a painter put a blank canvas on the wall. What is an artist name? The artist formerly known as Prince.


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Bracketed statements are typically found inside quotes. The words are bracketed to indicate that they were not the exact words from the quotes, but are either paraphrased or included to give clarity to the words. To use your example a little bit, suppose that the actual quote you want to refer to was: "See that hill over there? The man walked up that ...


0

You say that the persons asking you for feedback are friends. You are not asking how to criicize the work of other professionals. A professional writer is, in my opinion, someone who takes writing as serious as a job. He or she wants to excel in their writing, and when they ask for feekback, I would expect they want it honest and detailed. A friend is ...



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