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1

You will probably come to find that different writing styles suit different purposes. This is taught in most writing classes, usually with discussion of "audience" or "target" or "purpose". So you've already found one style (formal academic writing) that works for one audience and purpose. That doesn't mean it's the only way you can write. Your post here ...


0

Honestly, you must enjoy these high grades, even if you don't like that much. Why? High grades in school? Awesome; Not always you will like your writing, specially in school when you are forced to write certain themes. What to do to attain a more concise and unaffected writing style? If you really like to write, do it in your free time and write ...


0

For class, write whatever gives you a good grade. Otherwise, write for yourself. You already know what gives you that feeling of repulsion. Trust that feeling. Write for yourself.


1

Excessive concission always seems affected. Feel free to increase the words to idea ratio. Ignore the unimportant ideas as a way to cut verbosity. If you want your words to have a greater impact, say less and only say what matters. My greatest asset in limiting my vocabulary choice is to remember which words my little sister uses. If you are an only child ...


2

I'm not the best at writing, but I do know a couple of things for you to remember if you still can't find your "voice". Here is a quote: This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s ...


0

I've attempted to address this problem before, and I double-checked both Google help files and Google Add-Ons in hope of finding a solution for you (and me), but I've had no luck. Google Docs does not distinguish between odd and even pages that, in a book, would become the recto and verso pages. Without recto and verso, one cannot place a gutter margin on ...


0

Please read this interview with the writer Joan Didion: [Paris Review, Fall/Winter 1978]1 She is one of the greatest prose stylists in the 20th and 21st centuries, and here's one thing she said when asked about her greatest influence: "I always say Hemingway, because he taught me how sentences worked. When I was fifteen or sixteen I would type out his ...


0

A few scraps of advice I heard along the way: All great writers are great readers. Write every day. Burn the midnight oil.


0

A word repeated too many times in close confines can sound trite, but look at the would-be repetition as an opportunity to exercise your creativity. Instead of looking for a synonym, consider the places where you would repeat Norwegian as opportunities to provide more information about the subject. To learn more about Norwegian, I meet with Dr Bångun ...


0

I think the short answer is, Put the word in all caps. The criticism of all caps is when you write your entire text in all caps. Indicating that one WORD should be emphasized is perfectly reasonable. TRYING TO EMPHASIZE EVERYTHING YOU WRITE BY PUTTING WHOLE SENTENCES IN ALL CAPS IS USUALLY DISTRACTING AND COUNTER-PRODUCTIVE. Well, if you are writing a ...


1

In Winnie-the-Pooh (or something of a similar genre) there was a Habit of capitalising important words to emphasis its importance to the narrator. e.g. After all he really was A Very Important Bear. I think this works a lot more subtlety than all caps, which tend to jolt you out of the flow of reading. Capitalised words can be absorbed as part of the ...


6

Writing a word in ALL CAPS might be frowned upon because it is considered a visual equivalent of shouting, but shouting is a spoken form of emphasis, so ALL CAPS might be just what you need. Internet tradition (dating back to list serves, etc.) has used the underbar as a signal for italics: I will _never_ eat another steak. The underbar harkens back to ...


1

Yes, there's a general rule against repeating a word, but like many rules, it must be applied reasonably. If you're writing about Norway and the Norwegian language, it's likely you'll have to repeat "Norway" and "Norwegian" a fair number of times. While common words can often be replaced with synonyms, proper nouns usually cannot. I would definitely NOT ...


1

It's hard for me to give advice on word repetitions without seeing the whole piece. Just knowing how many times the word "Norwegian" is used isn't enough to allow me to comment.


1

It's a judgement call. You can certainly combine dialogue and actions in the same paragraph, and it's generally a good idea to do so when writing about someone giving a speech. But as you said, the "wall of text" is also a potential problem. The speech your character is giving will probably have separate ideas in it, times when you would make a paragraph ...


3

Maybe you already have a voice. It is difficult for writers to judge their own voices. You live with your voice all day long, in your head, so it seems normal to you, and boring. Other people (most of whom exist outside your head to some extent) don't live with your voice all day long. What do other people say about your voice? That said, I think there are ...


2

I always considered "finding your voice" something vague and meaningless, like "finding your inner you" or "finding your true self". What happens in reality is this: you copy your favorite writers, and then, gradually, their style starts merging with yours (that is to say, your own feelings, your own thoughts). Personal example: I started by writing like ...


1

I have two tips. 1. Read. This probably sounds strange at first. But I find some similarities between writing and speaking. You learned your speaking habits from those around you--your parents and caretakers when you were younger, your teachers (hopefully, at least as far as grammar and vocabulary goes), and nowadays more likely your friends and ...


5

Just keep writing. Writing is something you have to (and can) learn. So allow yourself the time (and many failures) to do so. Think of writing as being similar to learning a language or learning a craft. Practise makes perfect. Write what you care about. If you are not emotionally involved in what you write about, it will not touch your readers either. ...


0

Perhaps you could interrupt the dialogue with dashes wherever the action is performed.


0

Remember the guideline about every "scene" has to contribute to the overall story you're trying to tell. Any chapter that doesn't further the overall story in some way should be cut. This means that every chapter has a little part of the story to tell. And as soon as the chapter has told its part of the story, it should end. I disagree about keeping them ...


1

It seems you're using the term setting in a non-standard way to mean genre conventions. Given that, I would say that a mastery of genre, including the fulfillment of the expectations of the core audience, can bring short-term popularity, but that only good writing will endure over the long term. It's also worth noting that the most popular works typically ...


1

If I had a formula for what makes a book a bestseller, then I'd have a bunch of bestselling books to my name instead of the lame few hundred copies my books sell. I think the biggest factor in making a best-selling book is that the author is already famous. If a big-time Hollywood actor or a well-known politician or a champion athlete writes a book, it will ...


1

As Alexandro said: Neither of those. Many bestsellers are amazingly badly written, and bestsellers come from all genres and settings. What makes a bestseller is marketability and the marketing that are based on this. Every current bestseller has a clearly defined target audience and contains what that audience craves most. (For example, Fifty Shades of Grey ...


0

I agree with your first statement. There really are many, many factors in creating a bestseller, some of which vary depending on your target age range. The story's setting, if well written, can contribute a lot to a piece of writing. Without other factors, though, even a stunningly-written setting cannot make it to the top alone. An interesting plot and ...


1

Neither of those. They can certainly make a novel enjoyable. But make it a best-seller...I'm not sure. For instance, I've never heard people say that they want to read a novel because it's set in New York or Paris or Narnia. As for the writing...okay maybe this one is more important. However, the term is a little ambiguous. What do you mean by writing? The ...


1

English word order can vary (up to a point) and you create emphasis by where you place words. Usually something is seen as more important if it occurs first. For example, placing 'the library' first in the sentence you are giving it prominence. If you started with 'my search' that would be the most salient object.


1

Circumlocution. Locution that circles around a specific idea with multiple words rather than directly evoking it with fewer and apter words. Check the wiki article here.


0

In old fairy tales, the protagonists were sometimes referred to this way: the king, the princess, the miller's son. But there was only one of each, so it was okay to leave them lowercase. If there might be the slightest confusion about which grocer, officer, etc. is being discussed, you should capitalize them. If there is only ever one grocer in the story, ...


0

If you switch narrative tone, it will distance the reader and make it harder for him or her to achieve suspension of disbelief. If you are writing a post-modernist novel, or a post-post-modernist novel (say, a fable about life in a you-tube-saturated short-attention-span society), this might be a good thing. Otherwise, it is probably something to avoid.


5

If you are just referring to them by titles instead of names, you don't need to capitalize, but the narrative will seem impersonal. If the titles are being used in place of names, do capitalize them. Be aware, however, that this will change the entire feel of the book --it will make it seem more stylized and allegorical. If that's what you want, then go ...


11

There is a slight difference, if you capitalize the job titles. You can easily tell a story about a grocer, a cleaner and an officer without capitalizing their job titles. There won't be any confusion, if you always refer to these persons by the same handle. Readers will think that those are the jobs of these people, but that they have a life and ...


2

You could get away with drastically different tones if you had two different POV narrators. If one is Tina Fey and the other is Sylvia Plath, they will of course see the world differently. The contrast will probably make your book lean more towards humor/dark humor/satire, so as long as you're okay with that, give it a shot. This is not the same as a ...


1

You don't want to break the reader's immersion. With your writing, you build the reader's identification with your characters and his expectations about the future progress of the story. If your characters suddenly act out of character, they become unbelievable. If you story progresses in a random fashion, your readers will be confused. Sure, life isn't ...


0

In Shakespeare's Othello, Othello's speech often changes tone between scenes. He often sees himself as uncivilized however his tough is quite the contrary. However, in some scenes his language becomes more "brutal". This was just an example, I think that changing the tone of dialogue in a character can both allow the reader to identify the mood of a ...


1

I believe there are two different kinds of repetition, though they can appear as each other. In the first case, for example, you have an inadvertent use of the same non-trivial word in two consecutive or nearby sentences. It can have a dull repetitive sound to it, which can translate into boring. In the second case, you have a deliberate use of ...


0

One problem with repetition in prose is that it's not very interesting. In a sense it's a wasted opportunity. When stating that you were pissed and then later that it pissed you off, you aren't giving the reader any new information. Instead of wasting the reader's time by restating the same thing the opportunity should be taken to engage the reader with a ...


3

Repetition gives emphasis whatever is repeated. Repetition calls attention to whatever is repeated, especially if the repeated thing is unusual or interesting. Repetition can create rhythms. Repeated patterns can provoke expectations in the reader. For an extreme, haunting, brilliant example of repetition, see Rick Moody's story "Boys" (PDF).


1

I don't honestly see a problem with the two later examples. You have repeated words ("mind" and "pissed off") because you're talking about the same things/emotions multiple times. The only problem with the birthday example is that nobody talks like that. If you wrote "You forgot my birthday!" I said. "I did not! I would never forget your birthday!" ...


2

Words or phrases should not be repeated within the space of a couple of lines (except for small common words like 'the') unless you are doing it for effect, for example: "No. No. No. A thousand times no." The difficulty is judging when it works and when it doesn't. One way to see is to read it out loud.


1

Successful example: Arthur C. Clarke's Rama series. The first book, Rendezvous with Rama, read to me like a history book written 50 years from now. Very hard sci-fi, technical, a bit dry. The next three in the series, written with Gentry Lee, are more typical fiction, and center on the adventures of one family who are (I think — it's been a while) ...


3

I think the approach to this is to make what you write entertaining. Try to keep the style light, so you're not overwhelming the reader with facts. Use a steady build up, make the first few chapters skipable by someone who understands the field, but allows the layman to grasp the basics of where you're going. Keep the obvious stuff at the beginning, with ...


5

What you describe is mostly what the genre of High Fantasy is about. I have never found Le Guin or Tolkien to be archaic, or “dated”, it reads natural to me. I have more issues with Zelasny’s Princes of Amber series, or Moorcock's series, though. Also some fantasy authors try to inject artificial “old style” and that is glaring and distracting to the ...



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