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1

Start the story with where it is interesting. It's not necessary to know that you checked your luggage, showed your passport, and got a seat on the plane. All readers know that stuff happened. So tell if it the telling adds to the story, and skip if it doesn't. My guess is that the decision to go to Belize is probably interesting, so you might want to start ...


-2

Consult the Chicago Manual of Style. Enough said.


6

The rule of thumb about italics vs. quotes is "big things get italics, little things (or pieces of big things) get quotes." If it's the name of a book or magazine, italicize it. If it's the name of an article or blog post, put it in quotes. If it's the name of a movie, italicize it. TV shows have become debatable, because they are getting "bigger" in ...


2

Response from Scrivener Staff: I'm afraid that there are limits to how much headers and footers can be customised from within Scrivener itself and you've hit up against that. While Scrivener is capable of creating verso headers and footers (right and left), and it can create a different header/footer style for the "first pages" of the manuscript, it cannot ...


2

As far as I can tell, no. Use normal sentence case, where you capitalize the first word of a headline only. The exceptions are proper nouns, or other capitalized words listed in the style guide's section on capitals. The guide doesn't address words like "its"; The Economist has little patience with this sort of minutiae. However, as has been pointed out ...


2

It might be worthwhile to read different styles of contemporary poetry, looking for examples that are clear but have a sense of rhythm that appeals to you. Leaving aside the KJV Bible, it's worth remembering that Edward Bulwer-Lytton was an very popular and successful author in his day, with a style people loved, but now his prose style is a joke, with an ...


2

When a prologue is used if Fantasy, Science Fiction, or Historical novels it's common to show some of the historical, cultural, or political background leading up to the action.


6

Usually a prologue is outside the main flow of the story in some way: Tease with an out-of-sequence scene. The prologue might tease us by previewing a pivotal scene that will occur later in the main storyline. Often this is a snippet of the climax. Give context through a different viewpoint. A prologue might put the story into a wider context by offering a ...


6

I agree with Lauren's answer: A prologue is anything before the main body of a text, and can be whatever the author wants it to be. What matters is that it reads well. However, in my experience, an introduction, preface, or forward is usually written in the writer's or editor's voice; prologues are usually (but not always) part of the novel's story. All ...


11

A prologue is pro, before, the logos, word. It's text before the main body of the text. Whether a work needs a prologue is entirely up to the author. There is no right or wrong way to write one. There is no right or wrong content. It can serve as an introduction, a teaser, a flashback, background material, a recap, or anything else the author thinks might ...


4

I think you have everything right except the last one, which should be "What did the young lord say?" You're essentially following AP style for titles. Generally, capitalize formal titles when they appear before a person’s name, but lowercase titles if they are informal, appear without a person’s name, follow a person’s name or are set off before ...


1

Capitalizing 'the' gives a strong impression of "one and only", which might bring a feeling to the reader of the advertisement that the advertising company is very confident about the product. For example, "Discover THE best meal in XYZ restaurant." is more impressive than "Discover the best meal in our XYZ restaurant. "


-1

Instead of something like,"Suddenly,I heard a scream behind me.I was scared by that sudden scream.",try something like, "Out of the blue.. 'SCREECH!'a loud shriek sounded behind my back,and I froze in terror,puzzled and alarmed at the same time."Using phrases would make the writing a little more interesting,and try using direct speech and sound effects to ...


3

You might intersperse your travel with the basic history and geography of Belize (the interesting parts). Pretend you (in your story) are reading a book about Belize, and skipping to the juicy bits.


5

When it comes to writing, you should not try to portray things as you have seen them so, because it would not make the readers interested in it if the things you describe is not special or unusual ones. Whether you go to the places are special or not, The writing can make the them special. Or you should show the readers how did you see,feel about that and ...



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