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I've never translated anything longer than a paragraph, but I have had to produce extended pieces of writing in a consistent style. Here are my suggestions: Rather than starting at the beginning of the original and steadily translating page by page until you reach the end, do the translation out of sequence. E.g. if the original has twenty chapters, ...


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There's never anything wrong with breaking convention if there's a purpose and if you are precise. However, on that note, there is an enormous volume of research that has been done on translation. Linguists have created very clear styles and people are quite accustomed to them. If you did create a new style, it would beget the question as to whether the ...


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The best approach is to query the agent first and ask them what their preference is. It is unlikely that they all have the same policy. Asking them first shows them that you are aware of the issue and willing to adjust if required. That shows professionalism, which counts for a lot with agents.


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Cut 10% of your first draft in editing This tip is from Stephen King's memoir "On Writing." He got the tip as a comment in one of his rejection letters. The idea is that the language of your first draft is going to be flowery and full of superfluous words. Cutting 10% of those words will tighten your prose. King includes an example of how he edited the ...


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Kill your darlings The idea is that the mind is able to think "ingenious" about any old idea, and that the truth of that assessment can only be tested by trying the idea in reality. Unfortunately sometimes an idea will not work, but the "ingenious tag" persists and we try anything we can to keep our idea in play, even bend reality! This is when you need ...


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Of the two writing samples, I found the first one terribly confusing, and the second one much clearer. If you do want to give a sense of how Rhea reacts to the dream while she is experiencing it, you should stick to what she is aware of at any given moment. "Feeling better, son?" Dr Evans asks patronizingly, and Rhea braces for a violent response. ...


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Your questions says that your character is having a non-lucid dream, yet in your first description, which is supposed to be in dream, it says "Rhea understands what this dream is now." That is exactly what a lucid dream is. I think your best option may be to describe what she is seeing and her reaction as if it is a normal scene and either her reaction ...


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Have you read the "Strunk and White" style guide? It is not "English", it's apparently "Anglo-Saxon"! What I notice is that, it is brilliant! I am also trying to find a more modern guide to help with some technicalities, however, Strunk and White's guide is far more eloquent and deals with the art of writing also.


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Supporting Digital Dracula's excellent answer, don't be afraid to leave out details which have a long shelf life. Revulsion, for example, is not likely to leave your character in the moment he leaves the killing room. If your scene demands detailed and emotion-inducing descriptions, leave your character's emotions unspoken until a quieter, less word-bound ...


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I think this depends a lot on what you want to achieve. If, in your given example, you want to convey the feelings your MC experiences, you must be graphic or even gory. Parenthetically, as a vegetarian myself, I can totally empathize with such descriptions - but, trying to see the other side, you should try to visualize how they would make meat-eating ...


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Being a writer, I sometimes criticize the poor writing in my dreams while dreaming them, or note how a person or place is distorted from the real world example it is based on. Sometimes I seem to make myself wake up from a dream that seems about to turn bad. But don't ask us writers in the writers stack exchange, ask science experts in the science stack ...


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You can make the transition smoother by either revealing the intention to go somewhere and/or stop by the entrance made into the new setting. Skipping boring details about getting a cab will be taken for granted by your audience. You can weave it into the story even stronger by making your character worry about something related to the next setting. ...


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Rule #1 in technical documentation is: don't mislead the reader. If the command or function name begins with a lowercase letter, capitalizing it is an error -- it's not "Cat" but "cat". The Microsoft Manual of Style specifies that literal elements like this should be written with their correct case. It also calls for using text styling to offset them, as ...


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I would go with the first option. It's my understanding that's not Rhea ' s dream, but it's someone she knows well. Depending on the character, they would or would not tell the person they saw their dream. I feel as though the second option works well in scenes like they didn't know what the dream was about, or if you want to show other character's reactions ...


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The GNU site itself treats the name of the Make utility as an uppercased word: https://www.gnu.org/software/make/ There does seem to be a convention to frequently use make (the command) where Make (the name) would seem more appropriate. The GNU Make manual seems to do this almost exclusively (https://www.gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html) but always ...


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Bold is one way to emphasize something in a sentence. Recasting the sentence to put the emphasis where you want it is another method. Is one preferable to another? I'm not sure. The point of any writing is to communicate your point clearly and if using bold does that, why not? Conventional practice, however, seems to shy away from it in published work. You ...


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You've almost got it — you need to add a few more quote marks. You have quote marks for dialogue. In American English that's a double quote ("). When something is quoted within dialogue, you nest single quotes ('). When a person is speaking in paragraphs, you have opening quotes on all paragraphs, but closing quotes only on the last paragraph. ...


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I think the simplest way to achieve this is to say I drove past the stables and the servants' quarters, both empty I would personally avoid using a synonym like 'deserted' — functionally, you're just repeating 'empty', and most readers will notice. One question, though. It's not what you asked, but since you're recasting your sentence to mention that ...


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Don't mislead the reader. It is a cheap trick that will leave the reader unsatisfied and disinclined to trust you as an author. This does not mean you cannot have surprise, but the surprise should be produced by the logical progress of the story, not by artificially withholding information. Ask yourself, whose story is this. There may be surprises in the ...


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Simply choose another adjective: I drove past the empty stables and the deserted servant's quarters, and after another quarter mile I entered a very large circular driveway. Or break up the sentence so that you can group them together. Both the stables and the servant's quaters were empty as I drove by. After another quarter mile I entered a very ...


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I would avoid using the antagonist's POV if you want him to remain a mystery. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, one of the main characters is referred to throughout as person X, but is eventually revealed as person Y in disguise. This only works (to the extent that it actually does) because the series sticks closely to Harry's POV. If you're really ...


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If the reader is firmly in the character's POV, and expects to remain firmly in the character's POV, this is jarring and can throw the reader right out of the story. If the reader is firmly in an omniscient, opinionated narrator's POV, and is prepared to dip in and out of characters' heads, this works just fine. For this to work, you have to prep the ...


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This comes from a novice author, so take it with a pinch of salt, but here goes: I'm not 100% clear which perspective you're writing from (you've mentioned omniscient as well as individual characters' POVs), but it sounds like you're using what's often called 'third-person limited'. The narrative says 'he/she', but follows the viewpoint and experiences of ...


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What strikes me on reading your opening paragraph is that you have a dozen abstract nouns and no concrete ones. Somewhere in the transition from print to electronica, our news-generating process broke down. Today, we have in place an incentive system that awards viewership, and thus revenue, on grounds of ethical flexibility over journalistic integrity. It ...


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It might help to think of these phrases as signposting. Too much signposting will clutter the landscape and obscure the view. Whether that's the mountains, or the ideas in an essay, obscuring them is bad. On the other hand, judicious use of signposting can help the reader parse what you're saying. (For example, the chances are that in your mind, you ...


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I think emphasis can be very helpful. You need to make sure the reader knows when is he reading actions, when thoughts and when book. For example: I went on and read the book "I looked through the sky and there I saw it, a great bird..." My bird, I still wonder sometimes where it went. Another sip from my coffee to continue. "I thought it's all gone". ...


3

Don't name him in his own thoughts. (I'm going to add names here for ease of discussion.) You have: vengeance was his, Garth of the Bill clan. He was the Foremost of the Forsworn But he's not actually Garth of the Bill clan. That's what he wants his enemy Dave to think. He's actually Wayne of the Ted clan. While Garth and Wayne are both Dave's enemies,...


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My colleague Rob Waters taught me the value of "right-branching sentences." Sentences work best when they begin with a subject and a verb. Additional elements can follow if needed. Ex. John Wilkes Booth shot President Lincoln in an act of cowardly treachery, then ran for his life. Not: After shooting President Lincoln in an act of cowardly treachery, John ...


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Depending on the setting, the writer can use a conversational tone as a goal. The sentence probably needs work if it sounds pretentious when spoken aloud, or requires a deep breath to get through. Write with the reader in mind. However, even when the presumed audience is highly educated, readers are likely to prefer clarity over "fancy" language.


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It boils down to balance between primitive and pretentious. Both are bad, but unless you are a simpleton, it's easier to fall into pretentious than boorish. The rule to avoid this is simple: if a simpler word carries exactly the same meaning as the elaborate one, pick the simple one. If you need a phrase (two simpler words or more) to simplify the more ...


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I don't think your voice is chosen, it's what comes naturally from you. Therefore, it changes as you mature, as you read and write.


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I think a writer style or voice is something inner : you already have it, you just don't know how to express it. For that, you have to see and read other "voices", see what is possible to do, the different manners that exists, read, read and read, absorb all of it and let it age and then, when you've done enough reading : unlearn it all. You have to, unless ...


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Describe whatever the viewpoint character notices and has opinions about. In a naughty story, the characters might choose their attire to have certain effects on other people, or to express certain aspects of their attitudes, mood, or desires. Which means that the characters will have opinions about their attire and the attire of others. So describe ...


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This is a very broad question and a lot of thoughts come to my mind when trying to answer it. Two things, however, are specially important to me : Read a lot. Write different things. Read a lot because other writers' styles will bring you new ideas and narration techniques. Much like drawing style is influenced by visual artists we love (see all these ...


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Maybe this will work. Approximately 70% of small businesses in the United States struggle to hire qualified employees. Almost 50% of those small businesses cite lack of skills of potential employees as the reason jobs go unfilled. Filling those jobs with appropriately trained candidates is our focus.



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