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Here's the dictionary.com definition of poem: a composition in verse, especially one that is characterized by a highly developed artistic form and by the use of heightened language and rhythm to express an intensely imaginative interpretation of the subject. The problem, which everyone is indicating with their answers is the portion that states: ...


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Ah the eternal question in all art forms. What is music? So John Cage created 4'33" What is dance? So someone I forget who, possibly Merce Cunningham, stepped on stage and didn't move, and then left. What is a painting? So many a painter put a blank canvas on the wall. What is an artist name? The artist formerly known as Prince.


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Bracketed statements are typically found inside quotes. The words are bracketed to indicate that they were not the exact words from the quotes, but are either paraphrased or included to give clarity to the words. To use your example a little bit, suppose that the actual quote you want to refer to was: "See that hill over there? The man walked up that ...


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You say that the persons asking you for feedback are friends. You are not asking how to criicize the work of other professionals. A professional writer is, in my opinion, someone who takes writing as serious as a job. He or she wants to excel in their writing, and when they ask for feekback, I would expect they want it honest and detailed. A friend is ...


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The additional "and" changes the rhythm of the list. It elongates it, which can have the perhaps paradoxical effect of increasing a sense of pace and tension. "Monotony" isn't simply a matter something being boring or tedious. Used properly, it can convey a meaning of fullness and richness. Somewhat comparable to how "said" disappears in dialog, the ...


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A very good read which is informative and entertaining is, How To Read Literature Like a Professor, by Thomas C. Foster. Another very good book is Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice by Charles Bressler. A bit more academic, but quite good.


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I think this all comes down to the one question: Does the writing work? Fiction writers often attempt to escape critique (and criticism) by saying, "well, who can say if it is right or wrong, it is Art." Take It To An Extreme Okay, let's take that to an extreme. Imagine if I created an a piece of writing that was so original that it used a new ...


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"Literary criticism" and "editing feedback" are two entirely different beasts. Litcrit is about looking at an existing text and analyzing it. You look at the author's intent, you look at symbolism, at context, at what the writer wanted to achieve, at how it fits into X genre canon, and so on. Editing feedback is what you give on an unfinished piece of ...


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My 2 cents: Focus on the objective of the writer, and let your feelings and taste aside. Everyone have the right to have a taste, but a professional critics needs, in my opinion, give a guidance to the writer so the creator can fulfill his objectives, not the critics.


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One of the standard introductions for university students is Literary Theory: An Introduction by Terry Eagleton.


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Narrative is the experience of the narrator in his own words whereas descriptive story is analysis of any topic desired..


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One of my go-tos is "Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction" by Jonathan Culler. It's great for people who are new to literary theory, or for veterans that are looking to brush up on the basics.


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A parody makes fun of an artistic work by applying the characteristic style or theme to unlikely subjects. Example: Bored of the Rings. Satire mocks real people, their behavior, and their opinions. One of the most famous satires is probably George Orwell's Animal Farm, a satire of Stalinism.


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Parody is a mockery of a specific existing thing. Weird Al Yankovic writes parodies — "Beat It" as "Eat It," for example. Saturday Night Live parodies political figures by mimicking their qualities to extremes. Satire mocks general things and overall qualities and stereotypes, by being an exaggerated copy or twisting some element ironically. In South ...


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Yes, such generic placeholders are definitely washing out the image. The reader reads descriptions to gain knowledge of given situation, and these are empty, useless duds. If the information is limited, give the scraps that are still available. A surprising sight made me stop again. Two hands shoved me, or a mass against my back shoved me. Only use ...


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I don't know about the repetition, but I feel the somethings are bad style for different reasons. Avoiding "something" makes your text feel less wishy-washy and more intense and to the point: Not a minute passed, however, when the rottweiler stopped me again. At that same moment I was pushed to the floor. “... it seems like the dog wanted to ...


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By and large, overusing a specific word or phrase is not great style. However, what I see here is the same word used three times with three different meanings. The first usage references a mental idea or thought process. This could probably stand to be more specific (what made the narrator stop?) but otherwise is a perfectly cromulent usage. The second is in ...


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Adding to Dale Emery's answer, besides the effects listed in Wikipedia, one basic effect is that of emphasizing the staggering number of things: "there were apples, oranges, and bananas" is just a neutral list, whereas "there were apples and oranges and bananas" emphasizes the fact that there are impressively many different fruits to choose from. There ...


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I don't know how to give a quick summary of its effects. So I'll offer some terminology to aid your research. That technique is called polysyndeton. Wikipedia has a little bit about the effects: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polysyndeton You can also go in the other direction and remove all of the conjunctions. That is called asyndeton: ...


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The Chicago Manual of Style says that "unspoken discourse" can be either in quotations marks or not according to the author's preference. (Referencing some of the other respondents' contributions, Chicago does mention that in some countries em dashes are used for dialogue. I can only come from an American English perspective on this.) A good way to bypass ...


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All the screenplays I have seen always use the form of the name that the character is known by to the audience. For example, if you tell the tale of Robert Williams, but all the other characters always address him as "Bob", you use "Bob" as the marker for this character. If, on the other hand, Mr. Williams is a teacher and only his wife calls him "Bob", ...


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In all written English, dialogue by a character should be quoted as well as any other vocalized words. Ei. the character is talking to himself. Inner dialogue and thoughts should be italicized. The only real difference between dialects should be small punctuation changes, like whether to use single quotes or double.


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Keep your script consistent. You do not want to confuse the readers. So, yes, always use the full name.


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The only harm I see in adding numbers is that it takes up more space, and in some cases may make it that the entire heading no longer fits on one line, or a heading on the left runs into a heading on the right. I don't think it's so much a matter of weighing gain versus harm, as a "why bother". I'm hard pressed to think of cases where I say, "Now I want to ...


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If you know which chapter/section number you need - you know it from table of contents. And that means you know the page number and know which way to go. OTOH, if you remember "Stochastic methods, Limitations" was roughly 2/3 into the book, you can flip pages quickly, skimming the headers, and find required section easily. I'd find it really surprising to ...



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