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0

Personally, I always use an extra carriage return between paragraphs to mark a new section. With that said, if you include an introductory paragraph that summarizes your overall structure, it will make it much easier for people to follow your transitions, even without the "listing" words. Finally, if each section feels like a complete thought, the reader ...


1

I don't understand this question. When you write an article, that article will have one theme or subject. Everything that your write within that article will relate to that theme, and therefore everything that you write will somehow relate to each other. Your writing must make that connection clear, and that is the purpose of what you call "transition ...


4

Two classical typewriter methods are White-space and the Horizontal Rule. On the other hand, verbal transitions have significant value, in that they are clearer than simple formatting. I get the impression that your main objection is the feeling that they contribute to the cliche of the format (you read one self help book, you know how they all are ...


1

If the audience you are writing to knows what those acronyms are, then go ahead and use them. So for technical documents, resumes, etc, the audience knows what BS, MS, PhD stand for. Personally, I didn't know the technical or certifications acronyms, but if the document you are writing is very technical and meant for technical people you can get away ...


0

Read and write in English as much as you can. Use English exclusively in your life, if at all possible. One of the greatest writers in the English language, Joseph Conrad (author of Heart of Darkness), was in his twenties when he learned English, and it was his fourth language. Coming from another culture, you have an opportunity to bring an uncommon ...


1

Ask. Provided that you're reasonably polite and that you don't act like you're entitled to have your work featured in the paper, you're unlikely to make any enemies simply by asking. Most newspapers have email or postal addresses listed somewhere; sending them an email or a letter can't hurt. Phrases like "Are you looking for new content for [newspaper]?" ...


1

It's a matter of style, and depends very much on what you're writing, as well as on your personal preference. In something more formal (most non-recreational non-fiction writing, and anything where you're communicating with someone in a formal context), I'd use the longer form, while in less formal writing (most often fiction or recreational non-fiction) ...


0

Overusing I is common in English writing. You can write in passive voice, or rewrite to vary where 'I' appears in your sentences, so that they don't all start with I. This cure can be worse than the disease. Passive voice makes dull (technical) reading. You can combine multiple such sentences into one: I went to the store. I bought a cake. I ate it. ...


0

I am not sure I understand. Could you please specify what you mean by "the" used ahead of pronouns/conjunctions/prepositions ? As far as I can readily think of, "the" is only used in situations that match : the [adjective] "noun", [adjective] being optional. In some situations, an adverb can take the place of the adjective, in which case the noun itself is ...


1

One approach that I use is to write like a scientist. Rather than draw conclusions, scientists are trained to record their observations--for instance, a list of temperatures measured at 1-minute intervals during an experiment, rather than simply writing "Nuclear fusion was achieved!" So in fiction, you might say, "Small droplets of sweat appeared on Sumi's ...


1

"qualifier1 qualifier2 noun" is usually okay. "qualifier1 qualifier2 qualifier3 noun" is usually not okay Since it lays emphasis, "the" itself becomes a qualifier. Therefore, "the current policy" is okay, and "the current US policy" (or, worse still, "the current US military policy") is not. In that vein, "the US domestic market" is better stated as "US ...


0

If the abbreviation is understood by 95% of your intended audience, and 90% of their bosses, and you would seem pretentious if you spelled out the abbreviation, abbreviate it. Of your examples, only the following ones might meet this standard: BS, MS, PhD (and similarly, BA, MA, MD, JD). While DBA often stands for "Database Administrator", it also ...


2

I prefer your first - A cloud drifted lazily in the sky, heart-shaped, its curves flawlessly outlined as if drawn with a compass. As a personal preference, I'd remove adverbs where unnecessary - A lazy cloud drifted in the sky, heart-shaped, its curves flawless as if drawn with a compass.


0

Exhausted, I continued lying on my back. A cloud drifted lazily in the sky, heart-shaped, its curves flawlessly outlined as if drawn with a compass. I continued lying on my back, exhausted; a heart-shaped cloud, its curves flawless as though drawn with a compass, drifted lazily across my vision. It is obvious clouds are in the sky. I think your version is ...


1

Omitting should be an accessible approach, Steven. "Show, don't tell is a technique often employed in various kinds of texts to enable the reader to experience the story through action, words, thoughts, senses, and feelings rather than through the author's exposition, summarization, and description. If a writer of prose knows enough of what he is writing ...


2

The first one is correct, because it's a two-word clause modifying cloud. The second one would need some kind of verb in the last sentence, and the modifier is perilously close to dangling regardless. (Separately, isn't a compass a tool for scribing circles? Not sure how you'd create a heart shape that way.)


5

To me, the best exercise yet is Chuck Palahniuk's recommendation to avoid "thought verbs" for a couple of months.


0

Be more detailed. What was the weather like for the scene? What is the nature of the relationship between the characters? What do they look like? Is there anything special about their actions?


3

This depends in part on the type of writing (technical reference manual? novel with illustrations? etc) and how people will read it (printed book? online?). If a reader follows a reasonable path1 through the document, there should never be a point where he's looking at something incomprehensible. This applies to text, code samples, diagrams, and screen ...


0

Read this, Daniel Excinsky: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/26/books/writing-in-english-novelists-find-inventive-new-voices.html?_r=0 That's all, folks!


1

I would avoid the unneccessary enumeration of body parts: It was a bird. It was black with a golden underbelly. I would avoid the enumaration, because you are missing body parts that the reader is left wondering about: what about the bird's back, tail, peak, and legs? Are they black, too, or of a third color? If you say that the bird was "black with a ...


3

In printed books or journals, figures and tables are placed on the same double page as the first reference. Where exactly they are placed depends on how their placement affects page breaks. Typesetters try to avoid ugly "widows" and "orphans", that is, one or two lines broken from a paragraph and pushed to the next page. If page layout and logical text ...


2

The first answer by Matt Ellen is good, but excessively rigid imho. It is just a direct consequence of the grammatical fact that and is a conjunction while with is a preposition. So this implies indeed that whatever follows with is related to what precedes it. However, being related to does not necessarily mean being part of, as in : he saw his aunt with his ...


2

"Wings and a golden underbelly" is better because otherwise it seems like the wings have a golden underbelly. The second example depends on if you want the rooms or the building to have the shelves. With if you want to the rooms to have the shelves, and otherwise. In a list of attributes, such as yours, use and to demark the last attribute of the main ...


1

I don't know if it's correct to write it or not but I had no problem with the original sentence the way it is. The description presented both the mood in the situation and also conveyed a bit of what kind of person the other one in the room is.


1

Your real problem is that you have dialogue, and then the narration immediately after it tells us what the dialogue just said. Remove that bit. If we don't know that John's legs are on the table (as opposed to the chair, a statue, or someone's head), move that to John's action sentence. "Please, John, do not let our urgent matters get in the way of your ...


3

As long as the intervening text doesn't confuse any reference to the second element, you're okay. I wouldn't put the two items too far apart, but your first example is still perfectly clear.


-1

Good question. Typically it's fine, but it may bring up problems to deal with in the paragraph, and now you have a few: "...he scolded him..." This leads to the silly predicament, grammatically, of which is which. Since we know he was talking to john, that it is he scolded john, but the reader has to think of that, and grammatically you've made the reader ...


1

A screenplay is a script written for a screen, whether television or feature, but it's only used when the specifics of what's being worked on might be in question. Formatting is very similar for both types of projects, the difference has to do more with pacing, the number of locations, acts and scenes than actual formatting differences. Also a stageplay ...


4

The key is in what "as were the others" refers back to. It's not just "the chairs." It's not even that "the chairs were upside-down." It's that "the other chairs" are in a specific state of being that you are matching: upside-down AND on the table. After returning the materials back to their shelves, I turned the chair upside down on the table — ...


0

As.the title of the original publishing journal, Popular Science Monthly [1], shows "The Fixation of Knowledge" is an article "interpreting science for a broad audience". That is, it is popular science [2], in this case philosophy, or to be more precise, pragmatism [3]. There are countless pop science journals and monographs in all disciplines. You should ...


1

If you have identified good writers who can "create a passage by weaving different concepts, opinions and by varying the writing style and tone" then I think you need to go back and take a more critical look at what they've done. If you can't identify any, I'd suggest you find some. Good writing starts with good reading—lots of it. Read generally at first, ...


2

I recommend keeping quotation marks outside of the link, unless they're part of the title of the work. So you'd have this: I was reading the story "Flowers for Algernon" when the doorbell rang. I was paging through the tale "—All You Zombies—" when my arm was bitten off. (The latter story's title includes quotation marks.) Whatever ...


1

I would put the quotes in the link, because the quotes are around the title of the article and are therefore part of it. The CSS formatting is a question better asked on Graphic Design SE.


0

Here's one that I came up with for like a horror writing piece (keep in mind this is straight from my writing piece so you would have to form it and mold it to fit your story) "A shrieking, unnatural sound repeated like a strong pulse in my left ear, sending my nerve ends to send a jolt of energy running through my body as if....."



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