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4

The problem you're having is in attaching the final clause: NAME is...that helps...by rating...and helps... . When the reader gets to the "and" he's expecting it to bind to the "by" -- NAME helps by doing two things, rating and...helping. But the next word is "helps", which doesn't fit that pattern. So the reader has to mentally backtrack and ...


4

I think everyone can become better at something. With a lot of practice, I can learn how to play the piano better that I can now, but either due to motivation or to some innate way my brain is wired, I consider it outrageously unlikely that I will become as good as some classically trained soloist. Writing is the same. Everyone can become better Not ...


4

I think this depends a lot on what you want to achieve. If, in your given example, you want to convey the feelings your MC experiences, you must be graphic or even gory. Parenthetically, as a vegetarian myself, I can totally empathize with such descriptions - but, trying to see the other side, you should try to visualize how they would make meat-eating ...


4

Rule #1 in technical documentation is: don't mislead the reader. If the command or function name begins with a lowercase letter, capitalizing it is an error -- it's not "Cat" but "cat". The Microsoft Manual of Style specifies that literal elements like this should be written with their correct case. It also calls for using text styling to offset them, as ...


4

The GNU site itself treats the name of the Make utility as an uppercased word: https://www.gnu.org/software/make/ There does seem to be a convention to frequently use make (the command) where Make (the name) would seem more appropriate. The GNU Make manual seems to do this almost exclusively (https://www.gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html) but always ...


4

I think the simplest way to achieve this is to say I drove past the stables and the servants' quarters, both empty I would personally avoid using a synonym like 'deserted' — functionally, you're just repeating 'empty', and most readers will notice. One question, though. It's not what you asked, but since you're recasting your sentence to mention that ...


4

Simply choose another adjective: I drove past the empty stables and the deserted servant's quarters, and after another quarter mile I entered a very large circular driveway. Or break up the sentence so that you can group them together. Both the stables and the servant's quaters were empty as I drove by. After another quarter mile I entered a very ...


3

Nature Or Nurture? (Maybe Both) Of course it is always difficult to separate nature from nurture (was an artist born that way or did the events of her life transform her into the artist she now is). My knock-down, number one favorite book of all time (Make Your Words Work by Gary Provost - amazon link) on teaching writing starts out with the following: ...


3

This comes from a novice author, so take it with a pinch of salt, but here goes: I'm not 100% clear which perspective you're writing from (you've mentioned omniscient as well as individual characters' POVs), but it sounds like you're using what's often called 'third-person limited'. The narrative says 'he/she', but follows the viewpoint and experiences of ...


3

Don't name him in his own thoughts. (I'm going to add names here for ease of discussion.) You have: vengeance was his, Garth of the Bill clan. He was the Foremost of the Forsworn But he's not actually Garth of the Bill clan. That's what he wants his enemy Dave to think. He's actually Wayne of the Ted clan. While Garth and Wayne are both Dave's enemies,...


3

This is a very broad question and a lot of thoughts come to my mind when trying to answer it. Two things, however, are specially important to me : Read a lot. Write different things. Read a lot because other writers' styles will bring you new ideas and narration techniques. Much like drawing style is influenced by visual artists we love (see all these ...


3

It depends on what your intent is when you write. People write for pleasure, for money, for fame, for influence, for immortality, and etc. Many of the best writers - the ones whose names you remember a hundred or five hundred years later achieved all those things, but for every Shakespeare there are hundreds of writers who had success if you measure ...


3

To learn writing a specific tone; read books that has the kind of tone you want. You can even retype a chapter or two to get a feel for how that author/tone "feels in your fingers." Here are a few specific examples of what might work (and they are kind of in priority order as well): A protagonist that follows a negative character arc has the potential to ...


2

To answer #1 invites opinion; I believe there are special forums for polling and/or "popularity contests" As for the style itself; the first rule of English prose style is the same as that for writing code - HAVE A STYLE. For myself, in answer to #2, lacking specific guidelines or requirements for style I would use Associated Press (AP) Style. My ...


2

My colleague Rob Waters taught me the value of "right-branching sentences." Sentences work best when they begin with a subject and a verb. Additional elements can follow if needed. Ex. John Wilkes Booth shot President Lincoln in an act of cowardly treachery, then ran for his life. Not: After shooting President Lincoln in an act of cowardly treachery, John ...


2

It boils down to balance between primitive and pretentious. Both are bad, but unless you are a simpleton, it's easier to fall into pretentious than boorish. The rule to avoid this is simple: if a simpler word carries exactly the same meaning as the elaborate one, pick the simple one. If you need a phrase (two simpler words or more) to simplify the more ...


2

If the reader is firmly in the character's POV, and expects to remain firmly in the character's POV, this is jarring and can throw the reader right out of the story. If the reader is firmly in an omniscient, opinionated narrator's POV, and is prepared to dip in and out of characters' heads, this works just fine. For this to work, you have to prep the ...


2

I think emphasis can be very helpful. You need to make sure the reader knows when is he reading actions, when thoughts and when book. For example: I went on and read the book "I looked through the sky and there I saw it, a great bird..." My bird, I still wonder sometimes where it went. Another sip from my coffee to continue. "I thought it's all gone". ...


2

Don't mislead the reader. It is a cheap trick that will leave the reader unsatisfied and disinclined to trust you as an author. This does not mean you cannot have surprise, but the surprise should be produced by the logical progress of the story, not by artificially withholding information. Ask yourself, whose story is this. There may be surprises in the ...


1

Supporting Digital Dracula's excellent answer, don't be afraid to leave out details which have a long shelf life. Revulsion, for example, is not likely to leave your character in the moment he leaves the killing room. If your scene demands detailed and emotion-inducing descriptions, leave your character's emotions unspoken until a quieter, less word-bound ...


1

Bold is one way to emphasize something in a sentence. Recasting the sentence to put the emphasis where you want it is another method. Is one preferable to another? I'm not sure. The point of any writing is to communicate your point clearly and if using bold does that, why not? Conventional practice, however, seems to shy away from it in published work. You ...


1

You've almost got it — you need to add a few more quote marks. You have quote marks for dialogue. In American English that's a double quote ("). When something is quoted within dialogue, you nest single quotes ('). When a person is speaking in paragraphs, you have opening quotes on all paragraphs, but closing quotes only on the last paragraph. ...


1

I would avoid using the antagonist's POV if you want him to remain a mystery. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, one of the main characters is referred to throughout as person X, but is eventually revealed as person Y in disguise. This only works (to the extent that it actually does) because the series sticks closely to Harry's POV. If you're really ...


1

What strikes me on reading your opening paragraph is that you have a dozen abstract nouns and no concrete ones. Somewhere in the transition from print to electronica, our news-generating process broke down. Today, we have in place an incentive system that awards viewership, and thus revenue, on grounds of ethical flexibility over journalistic integrity. It ...


1

Depending on the setting, the writer can use a conversational tone as a goal. The sentence probably needs work if it sounds pretentious when spoken aloud, or requires a deep breath to get through. Write with the reader in mind. However, even when the presumed audience is highly educated, readers are likely to prefer clarity over "fancy" language.


1

Describe whatever the viewpoint character notices and has opinions about. In a naughty story, the characters might choose their attire to have certain effects on other people, or to express certain aspects of their attitudes, mood, or desires. Which means that the characters will have opinions about their attire and the attire of others. So describe ...


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I don't think your voice is chosen, it's what comes naturally from you. Therefore, it changes as you mature, as you read and write.


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Maybe this will work. Approximately 70% of small businesses in the United States struggle to hire qualified employees. Almost 50% of those small businesses cite lack of skills of potential employees as the reason jobs go unfilled. Filling those jobs with appropriately trained candidates is our focus.


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First, stay away from expressions like "in my opinion." It's your essay; this is understood, increases word count, and takes time if the essay is in an exam situation. Second, this is a topic with a GREAT DEAL of social science research. If you have an unlimited time frame, this is the sort of thing you can at least get as far as Wikipedia. Some of the data ...


1

It can work, and quite well. The Ciaphas Cain series (Warhammer 40k) does this to a degree. From the wiki stub: The novels are presented as Cain's personal and often rambling notes. After his death, a third party edited them into a more coherent form, interspersed them with footnotes or snippets of other accounts where Cain's first-person (and self-...



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