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Some of the stories that I have read are incredibly dark, based simply on the events that occur, but did not feel that way when read. Bringing out a lighter side can be done in a number of ways: Characters/ Relationships Having characters that are hopeful or optimistic will go a long way to brightening a story (unless they are annoyingly optimistic to the ...


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You can talk to real-life veterans and see how they coped with war. One tactic is "gallows humor" or "black humor," which is seeing the humor even in grim moments (common to veterans, law enforcement officers, doctors, and first responders). The TV show MASH was essentially built on this. There are many examples on the TV Tropes page (consider yourself duly ...


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According to Hart's Rules, Section 3.2 Paragraphs has the relevant info: New paragraphs following headings should be ranged full left. New paragraphs not following a heading should be indented one tab. Leave the first line of the story alone, but the dialogue and the paragraphs following should each have a single tab indentation for the first line. ...


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While not a perfect solution, this may help somewhat: Der arme Siegfried stand herum, hörte dem Gespräch der Fremden zu "Ha, der versteht uns doch eh nicht" to demonstrate in english: Poor Siegfried was standing around, listening to the foreigner speaking "Ha, he will not understand what we are saying, that moron" Of course there is always the ...


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Writing a memoir style fantasy story could work well, if you follow a few guidelines. Write it as though the main character intends to explain the magic to someone who doesn't understand it. For instance, someone born in the new peaceful age who wasn't around for the introduction of the magic and therefore might require an explanation. Create suspense. You ...


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I would not advise swapping round the languages. Part of the flavour of any story is its setting. If I am reading a book set in Germany or Austria I expect and understand that, for the most part, the characters will be depicted as speaking German, even if it is translated into English for my benefit. I also accept and understand that English will be a ...


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While this is, indeed, an endnote as noted by others, the part in parenthesis IS a citation. It seems to follow Chicago's endnote style: (City: Publisher, Year.) It's not pure Chicago because it doesn't include the author's name and book title in the standard format, but to me it looks like it was influenced by Chicago's style, adapted for use in the ...



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