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5

Neil's answer does not really deal with dialogue. Style manuals like the Chicago Manual of Style deal with academic and journalistic writing. If you want to apply them to narrative fiction, they only apply to that part of your writing that is explicitly in written language, that is, everything outside the dialogue. Dialogue is spoken language, or rather, ...


4

In fiction, there's no rule for this, only differing styles and opinions. However, some editors seem to like using the Chicago Manual of Style's alternative rule for this. 9.3 An alternative rule--zero through nine. Many publications, including those in scientific or journalistic contexts, follow the simple rule of spelling out only single-digit numbers ...


4

Print versus web. By far the majority of print books format paragraphs by indenting, and not by inserting space between paragraphs. The other style, with inter-paragraph spacing and no indentation, seems like a far more recent style to me, achieving popularity with the rise of the Worldwide Web. Most of the ebooks I buy (and I buy a lot) use indentation ...


3

Which style do you follow? APA (from the APA Style Blog) Capitalize the first word of the title/heading and of any subtitle/subheading; Capitalize all “major” words (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns) in the title/heading, including the second part of hyphenated major words (e.g., Self-Report not Self-report); and Capitalize all ...


3

I'm not able to find a sample of the book, but, from what you've posted above, it looks like the author decided to capitalize the first three words of each section, as noted in the comments above. That first one is different because "Fear of Music" needs to be set apart from the artist. I've seen many big authors use this capitalization technique; it's just ...


3

Looking at a sample of the book it seems obvious to me that the use of capital letters is rather arbitrary. It doesn't enhance the text, in my opinion. Actually, it looks like rather lazy editing to me.


3

If you want to help those among your audience who do not know your references, add "the surrealist painter Salvador Dali" or "blue giant star". Giving not only the name of the object you refer to but adding its category (painter, star) helps readers understand your argument even if they don't know that particular item. How you describe the category ("the ...


3

I agree with both your points: if your first sentence stood alone, I'd omit that. But in sequence with the other two, it sounds better to leave it in. There is an actual rule in English linguistics called that-deletion, which allows you to drop the word "that" before certain independent clauses if you choose to. In this case, I'd keep it.


3

Arguably, one could say that the pronunciation of such a string is ambiguous. Would someone say it "em five five slash nine eight seven dot three" or "em fifty-five nine eighty-seven point three" or other possible variations. If the "M" stands for something, do they say the word or just the letter "M"? Etc. If it matters in the story, then you need to spell ...


2

It's not related to academic vs non-academic styles, but a mere matter of proper typography and cost-effectiveness. Butterick's Practical Typography offers the generally accepted rule: A first-line in­dent is the most com­mon way to sig­nal the start of a new para­graph. The other com­mon way is with space be­tween para­graphs. First-line in­dents ...


2

If your example is part of narration in a story, you have it written exactly right. There's no need for the acronym. "aka" the acronym originally came from law enforcement when describing someone's alias. It happens to be useful enough that it's migrated out of jargon into non-LEO usage, but you wouldn't use that acronym in running prose any more than you ...


2

For a thesis report, different academic citation systems have different styles. I am more familiar with MLA style rather than Chicago, which someone has already discussed. MLA asks that every paragraph is indented and that there are no extra lines separating paragraphs. The only exception I know of to this rule is if you have a multi-line paragraph quote ...


2

Life is random. Fiction is not. This is called "plot". The basic rule of (most, regular) fiction is that everything that goes on in the narration must somehow relate to the protagonist and his goals. You do not fill your story will irrelavant details or randomly string together people and events that lead nowhere. In life, things might happen that have no ...


2

What is the purpose of the reference? If it is essential to the reader's understanding of the story that he understands the reference, than I'd be more likely to add some explanation. If it's just a side comment to add a little flavor to the story, then probably not. As What says, you can often easily toss in a couple of words that give the reader at least ...


2

Firstly, congratulations on landing a publisher! That's one of the hardest steps. That being said, if this is your first novel (even if not), it's probably best to go with what your publisher wants. If your novel will be published in the US, then it's general practice to have a version with the US standard of style. You can keep the UK style for the UK ...


1

In school the rule of thumb for capitalizing titles was first word, last word and all important words (and almost all words were important excluding only articles prepositions and conjunctions). If we follow that rule the question is cashflow one word or two? If it is one word it gets one capital and no space, if two words it gets two capitals and a space. ...


1

If the references are meaningful to you, keep them. In removing those references in order not to confuse readers, you remove you from the story. My guess: Removing you from the story will remove the very thing that would have attracted readers. Net result: Fewer readers, rather than more. Be yourself, right out loud, right there in your stories. The ...


1

A good example would for what you're talking about may be found in the Harry Potter series, in which, correspondingly to your EDIT, there is a spotlight on Harry Potter being the chosen one. Her literary shortcomings aside, Rowling weaved the most intricate plot i have ever witnessed in a series. In fact, upon finishing Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, ...


1

I think that this question also relates to writing as Alexandro is asking how to write it - he has just simply used the wrong wording and the question does, in fact, refer to how to write something (whether or not it mentions formatting does not exclude the fact that Alexandro is asking about how to write it). I have modified the question to reflect this. ...


1

I've never heard this style called "academic". I don't know if you just made that phrase up or you heard it somewhere. But since I was a wee lad in school 40 years ago, I've always been taught that there were two styles for writing a paragraph: "block style", where you put a blank line between paragraphs, and "indent style", where you indent the first line ...


1

Up until recently the "correct" way to indicate the start of a new paragraph. It is what was taught at schools and preached by style guides. Esentially it is the default because it has been the default for a long time. Now, either tend to be considered acceptable (although some insitutions or organisation may prefer a particular style) but indents are ...



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