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5

In my opinion, any answer looks messy. One "sentence" with capitals halfway through bugs me; so does a line starting without a capital. Personally, I would restructure the entire thing to avoid the issue entirely: Example 1 Currently, line 57 of camera.py looks like this: camera.start_recording('foo.h264', quantization=25) In this line, the ...


3

The difference is that the first sentence doesn't have a tag. It's a line of dialogue followed by a complete sentence. The second sentence is dialogue followed by a dialogue tag. Your first set of examples is punctuated correctly — when you use a tag, the dialogue ends in a comma, and the tag starts with a lowercase letter. This also applies to ...


3

There aren't rules. As previously mentioned, it's a matter of opinion. But, things to remember include: Brains like patterns. So, if you use similar phrases several times in a row, you might consider putting them in the same place to add emphasis. That said, if you don't do that carefully, you can sound repetitive or uncreative. I received a pretty good ...


3

I suffer with the same problem, and I hate resorting to using a cliché when I'm writing. I don't have any examples of resources for you, but I can give you some of my techniques for dealing with the weather. I try to avoid weather descriptions as much as possible, because each weather condition falls into around 3 standard descriptions (mild/howling/biting ...


3

You have it right. Use an em dash to indicate interruption or other abrupt stop. Note that with the dash and the guard's remarks, you don't need "he was not allowed to finish." Readers will understand that the guard interrupted him.


2

In APA use the name and institution only, no titles, no functions. Your example would read: John Doe* * Faculty of Physical Education, Monsters University, X City, X country John Doe** ** Faculty of PE, Monsters University, X City, X Country


2

I know third person gives me more power over emotions but that would be limited to just one character. No. With third person omniscient narrator freely switching the followed character, you can easily flip between the two. Such switches are not nearly as freely available with first person, where you must follow one character for a full section. It boils ...


2

I think that some people have an unhealthy obsession with this show-don't-tell thing. Show don't tell is one possible specific style, it is not a God given commandment or one of the basic laws of physics. Most current bestsellers are full of telling, and they read (and sell) well nonetheless. I for one am completely happy with a writer telling me that her ...


2

I agree with Cameron. Except, I would end the paragraph at "...nothing more than a sphere of blood." There really is no need to give a size for that sphere, the destruction is drastic enough without the compression. In fact there where two deal breakers for me: the acknowledgment of the story being mere fiction ("period at the end of this sentence"), and ...


2

I think the "smaller than the period at the end of this sentence" breaks the formal tone of the sentence. The beginning of it is so grasping and makes me want to dive deeper but I feel like using that may be a bit too young for the overall feel. Maybe try and compare it to something else other than the period like a pebble, a button, a coin, something that ...


2

This is a matter of opinion, especially since the meaning is the same. There is no hard and fast rule, but rhythm is very important in sentence structure. Ordering the words so that they roll off the tongue in many instances makes them more pleasing to the eye. In this case I think the first example just sounds better.


2

The point of this is to help the person judging the proposal know how to position and sell your book. If there are other books in the same general space, it shows that there is a pre-existing market. This may be harder to demonstrate for a book that is well and truly unique --unfortunately in today's marketplace, no one wants to be a pioneer. On the other ...


2

If this is a question of accepted style then my first stop would be whoever would be likely to receive or review or grade or publish said work. Some bodies have very clear cut ideas about how things should be presented. However if the focus here is readers then one need only consider their own expectations, memory skills, etc and the importance of the ...


2

Print versus web. By far the majority of print books format paragraphs by indenting, and not by inserting space between paragraphs. The other style, with inter-paragraph spacing and no indentation, seems like a far more recent style to me, achieving popularity with the rise of the Worldwide Web. Most of the ebooks I buy (and I buy a lot) use indentation ...


2

The dash seems right, but the capitalisation of the following sentence seems awkward to me. I don't have a formal justification for why it shouldn't follow the same rules as, for example, '"Yes," he said' - except to say that it reads in my head in a similar lilting sort of voice, ruining the "interruption" effect. Perhaps something like: "Yes, I thi–" He ...


1

I've never heard this style called "academic". I don't know if you just made that phrase up or you heard it somewhere. But since I was a wee lad in school 40 years ago, I've always been taught that there were two styles for writing a paragraph: "block style", where you put a blank line between paragraphs, and "indent style", where you indent the first line ...


1

Up until recently the "correct" way to indicate the start of a new paragraph. It is what was taught at schools and preached by style guides. Esentially it is the default because it has been the default for a long time. Now, either tend to be considered acceptable (although some insitutions or organisation may prefer a particular style) but indents are ...


1

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like. I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it. Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the ...


1

Adding to @LaurenIpsum: Keep in mind that different countries punctuate differently. From this source: American style uses double quotes (“) for initial quotations, then single quotes (‘) for quotations within the initial quotation. “Economic systems,” according to Professor White, “are an inevitable byproduct of civilization, and are, as John ...


1

Unlike Chris Sunami, I suspect that this task was not given to help the agent or publisher better sell the book. They are professionals and (should) know their field. If they don't, you have chosen the wrong publisher. I rather believe that these professionals want to see if their prospective new author is a professional, too, and knows the context in which ...


1

Here are the things I consider. Clarity. Moving a phrase can make the sentence more clear or less clear. For example, moving a modifier further away from the thing it modifies sometimes makes makes the relationship harder to see. But not always. I'm not sure how to give rules about that, but if you consciously check how the ordering affects the clarity of ...


1

I prefer the first example, the "where-and-when" one. If you think about it, humans tend to (at least in my experience) ask the question "where and when?" when asked if they would like to meet; rarely have I heard anybody ask "when and where?" Example: Bob: "David, would you like to meet for lunch?" David: "Sure, where and when?" Now consider ...


1

I approach code in text in the same way I approach dialogue: the code is a quotation from another "speaker", so I set it off from the surrounding text. Since it is not spoken language, I do not use the conventions for spoken language (same font, quotation marks, etc.), so as to cause no confusion, but the conventions for displaying code (monospaced font, ...


1

I am not specifically familiar with that book, but as much as I hate to admit it (I am not fond of microsoft) they tend to do these things well. The two pieces advice I would give you are to supplement with a traditional style guide like Chicago, and document where you draw each standard from; and to feel free to set your own style for things where the style ...


1

I would recommend Melville, particularly his descriptions of various events out at sea. He is a superb describer of action. With respect to weather, connecting it to the familiar is one method. Metaphors will be helpful here. You are correct in wanting to avoid clichés. Simplicity is your friend here. Consider this passage from Marquez, "The sky crumbled ...


1

MLA style guide recommends the following when it comes to referencing other works in your title: Use quotation marks and/or italics when referring to other works in your title, just as you would in your text: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as Morality Play; Human Weariness in "After Apple Picking"


1

You have it correct EXCEPT for the capitalization, as pointed out by krman. The sentence should read: "Yes, I th—" He was not allowed to finish. "Shut him up NOW!" the guard growled. The reason 'He' is capitalized is because 'He was not allowed to finish,' is a complete sentence. If it had been 'he began,' or something, it would be lowercase. ...


1

In this example, just move the word in question outside the quotation marks: It is possible for God to desire "all people to be saved." It's more difficult in the case that the word in question is buried in the quote. In that case, you would probably just put the entire word itself in brackets.



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