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6

Hard rule? No. Style guide? Yes. As an aspiring author, you absolutely need to pick a style guide and use it or these problems will keep picking at you. I like The Chicago Manual of Style. As such: Born late in the year, Adam was the only kid in his small, fourth-grade class that had already turned eleven. Every morning, he got up at exactly 4:56 a.m., ...


4

You don't capitalize the dialogue tag she said or she laughed if it's attached to your dialogue. You would only capitalize She laughed if it's a new thought. So: "Do you know where we are going?" she said. "We're going to Albuquerque," he responded. "Seraphina!" the dark Persian man cried. BUT "Do you know where we are going?" She ...


3

I took a class with Ellen Meister, who said that it doesn't really matter until your book becomes published, that the publishers will decide how to write the numbers according to their rules.


3

Like Lauren Ipsum said, don't overdo it. I personally prefer a slight dialect over the example you gave, which would become cumbersome if used in more than a few paragraphs. Also, don't make their grammar perfect. I don't mean that use garbled grammar, but rather some slight errors, and omissions.


3

As someone with a speech impediment myself (far more pronounced as a child) I cringe reading this type of dialog. If it's important to the story, perhaps you could describe the type of impediment (like mixing up w/l sounds in this case) or have another character comment on it (for example if the child is being mocked, the other character might use "wiv" in ...


2

Just write the children's dialog normally. Intentionally misspelling chunks of text makes reading difficult and slow. (And if reading a story is too hard, I'm putting the book down.) If it's important for a character to have a speech problem, just tell us what it is. We're pretty good at interpreting the words on the page into the character's voice. See ...


2

I don't think it's possible to give a definitive answer to this question. Different people have different styles. Do what works for you. I write non-fiction. (I've got two false starts on novels that I've set aside to work on another non-fiction book.) I try to collect all my raw information in a mass of notes, not necessarily well organized, and dump them ...


2

Growing up through the original (Episodes 4-6) Star Wars, I can tell you Return of the Jedi was going to rock most of America no matter what it looked like. We were all invested and even enjoyed the Ewoks--sort of. The same was true, but to a lesser extent, with The Matrix and Terminator series. When the first two kick ass, the viewer/reader is invested. ...


2

I'm not sure if there is a way to draw out a strong emotion of a certain scene into further scenes (particularly into the sequel). You can, however, draw out the emotional scene itself. I haven't seen The Scorch Trials, so I don't know the scene in question, but if the character gave an emotional speech and then turned and left, you would feel the emotion ...


2

I'd go with the approach you've already hit upon here: I have considered making a small statement that states that myself will be referred to as "participant A" and my significant other will be referred to as "participant B", but this might add unnecessary confusion. I don't think it's going to add any confusion. If participant is a bit too long, you ...


2

While not a perfect solution, this may help somewhat: Der arme Siegfried stand herum, hörte dem Gespräch der Fremden zu "Ha, der versteht uns doch eh nicht" to demonstrate in english: Poor Siegfried was standing around, listening to the foreigner speaking "Ha, he will not understand what we are saying, that moron" Of course there is always the ...


1

I would not advise swapping round the languages. Part of the flavour of any story is its setting. If I am reading a book set in Germany or Austria I expect and understand that, for the most part, the characters will be depicted as speaking German, even if it is translated into English for my benefit. I also accept and understand that English will be a ...


1

I would break it into two sentences such as: All fruits are harvested. The rotten ones are removed. There isn't a formula that I am aware of, but I would recommend trying not to use 'then', using the present tense and using a third person perspective. I would also recommend using a grammar checker such as Language Tool to show you where there are problems. ...


1

You just need to increase the height of your header. Alternately you could drag down your top margin on the main part of the page. I haven't used Scrivener so I couldn't tell you exactly how to do it.


1

Writers seem to believe that readers need every last bit of detail in order to realize the author’s vision. But the truth is, readers aren’t actors who need direction in how to act out a scene exactly. In fact, some of the best performances in acting are the result of the actor winging it or otherwise improvising. Give your readers a chance to improvise. ...


1

Personally, I find this style of dialogue (and even when it's done in other media) extremely annoying and (as a father of three) completely unrealistic and unrepresentative of how children speak. Certainly, some children have trouble with speech and pronunciation, however it's not as cartoonish as often implied. A stammer or stutter is not, however, ...


1

If you're planning on submitting to a traditional publishing house (i.e. print media), then you're probably going to want to avoid using different fonts. Many publishing houses have requirements on submitted manuscripts that involve using a particular font (fixed width seems to be popular). However, if you're planning to self-publish, then I'd say use ...


1

I'd say yes if you're careful about it and don't overdo it. Different formatting can be useful in quickly alerting the reader that the text is from an article or an email, particularly if it begins a chapter. I wouldn't make it a third of the book, but used judiciously, sure.


1

i find this type of writing very quickly irritating. If you ask the reader do do an extra effort understanding what you write, you break the narrative flow. Use phonetic writing mininimaly, and only if you have to.


1

"She's late again" is a quote that is a part of a sentence, not the sentence itself. The rule is that you separate the quote and speaker tag with a comma. Therefore, you put a comma after "again" and a period after "Jason," which is where your sentence actually ends.



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