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You can approach this from two directions: DIY, as outlined in Monica's answer. Use basic XML tools and the DITA Open Toolkit. Up-front cost can be low, but expect to spend a lot of time getting it to work the way you want. Support for content reuse will be minimal. Get an integrated solution. The one I know of is Author-it. This combines an authoring ...


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DITA is an XML format, so any editor or IDE that supports XML will work for you. Options with good XML support range from Eclipse (free) to Oxygen and Epic (several hundred dollars per seat). Of course, anybody who's comfortable getting up close and personal with the XML can use Emacs, vim, or Notepad++, too. (Don't laugh; I write all my XML and HTML in ...


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As many have suggested, there are many ways to do this. I'll ignore the problems with flashbacks and backstories for now, because I think it's going to be the same problem no matter how you choose to structure your work. You can either go for true parallelism, where both heroes are going through the same thing at the same time. So, for example, at the ...


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My first advice to anyone using parallel-narrative / multiple-1st-POV technique (which by the way is my favorite story-telling style) is this... Make Each POV Character's voice and world-view distinct. Each character should be instantly recognizable from the moment they "pick up the microphone". You, the author, will be switching between time-lines ...


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Read George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series. Something like a dozen POV characters per book, cross-continent, secondary/tertiary/quaternary characters. Totally doable. Also, this question might be useful to you, even though your book is not first-person: First person pov with more than one main chars


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Read the novel "The night circus" by Erin Morngenstern . There are lots of parallel time lines in different chapters . There are no specificic exclusive indicators to the reader as to what timeline it is , but the very narrative makes the reader to quickly figure out which time line it belongs to, by overlapping the ending word pictures of the previous ...



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