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If you make your story unique and different, it doesn't matter. Maybe you know "The Hunger Games" by Susan Collins. The storyline is practly the same than "Battle Royale" by Coshun Takami. The idea of a group of people stucked in a place killing each other, is the same, but Susan Collins put her own style turning it into a TV show. Same story line, totally ...


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It is very common for writers to come up with similar ideas—sometimes extraordinarily similar. In some cases, it comes about from two writers being influenced by the same previous works. I remember, when X-Files was popular, quite a few people independently came up with TV series ideas that were basically "X-Files for kids". Other times, the connections are ...


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There are only a few basic storylines. Some say there are only seven basic plots in all fiction. What differentiates different works is the telling. If the telling of your work reminds people too strongly of the telling of another work it will seem derivative. But if the basic story structure does not resemble one of the story archetypes written into the ...


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George Lucas wrote a Flash Gordon movie, but couldn’t get the rights to produce it. So he changed all the names of the characters and changed the title to Star Wars. So short answer: no, it doesn’t matter. Plagiarism is when you literally copy/paste pieces of someone else’s work into your own, not when your story belongs in the same section of the bookstore ...


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I've never heard of Ulysses. I'd suggest you write everything down, even if it contradicts itself. Then you work on fixing it when you edit. Whatever you do, DO NOT BECOME PARALYZED IN A BOG OF DOUBT! Cheers.


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There isn't nearly enough mathematics around here. Let's try some. Consider the extreme case, where every time you write a chapter, or go back and edit a chapter you break the logic of the chapter before it. Suppose your book will be 100 chapters in length and each new chapter or each edit takes up all of your writing time that day. After chapter three, ...


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Every writer has a different process. Here's what works for me. While thinking about the project before I start writing, I make notes about what I want to do and where I want to go. Some people work from an outline, but I never do. I simply work from a feeling about the characters and the story. When I am writing, I make sure to keep a set of notes about ...


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If you are a discovery writer, this is part of your process. Just get it all on the page and keep writing; you'll finish when you finish. However, it is then part of the first draft that you must go back and sort it out from beginning to end and make sure it's a coherent whole. Writing "the good parts" is fun and keeps you motivated. As long as you accept ...


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Like many answers in life: it depends. I'm not sure how Ulysses works, but I imagine it can splice/paste ideas, keep virtual notecards, and whatnot Some writers draw out long outlines and try to roughly stick with them while others rely on stream-of-consciousness storytelling, at least for the first draft. It is also OK to do something in between. ...


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Good storylines are about overcoming challenges, not exposition. Amnesia as a plot device tends to be trite and overdone, however, that does not mean it can't be used effectively. The recent US TV show Blind spot uses the idea of a "drug" that washes away all of a person's memories except for flash bits to good effect. Realistically in a longer story, it ...



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