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I like the characters and I think it would make a really engaging story. What you have running there is a pretty good style and if done right, the readers won't put down the book. But then again, having just a style is usually not sufficient if you want the novel to be commercially hit. Most commercial novels have a generic structure - those three acts- the ...


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The problem is that the complexity increases exponentially with additional points of view. Ideally, you'd have only one point of view, the teen. At most, you should have two, the teen and his mentor, who increases the complexity by two squared or four. The people on the train should not be "point of view" characters, but rather minor characters. To use ...


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Focusing on the theme can help immensely. You described it as: (The main point of the story is how each person sees the world differently and interprets the objective reality through subjective lenses) All prior stories I am familiar with that explore this theme use overlapping timelines, e.g. the same event told from 4 different characters' POVs. You ...


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My favorite example of presenting a very technical subject in an informal manner is Designing an Authentication System: a Dialogue in Four Scenes. When you read it you will be able to see that there is no limit on how technical a subject you can cover in light prose, and that in some cases it is better than formal styles. So we know it can be done, the ...


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Either I'm misunderstanding what you have said or I think you need something to tie various people together. I was just thinking of the disaster movie 'Towering Inferno' and obviously what tied really diverse people together was a fire. However, all the individual reactions to it, including the many deaths, were eventually subsumed by the putting out of fire ...


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Consider that there may be no central character premise, and that the story does not conclude by delivering a moral. (Typo'd as "amoral".) Perhaps the central premise is the train crash. Within that context, how are the characters changed, individually? If they interact, is their world-view challenged? Is their sense of certainty and self worth ...


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"Mainstream" may not be the right word. But it is clear that BDSM is becoming "acceptable." There was a time when "romance," like "marriage," was between one man and one woman. And more to the point, in a conventional sense of the word, with no "unusual" sex. BDSM used to be seen as a "perversion." The ("S" stands for Sadism, perpetrated by the Marquis de ...


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A book has a moral premise. A character has a goal. You can have as many protagonists and parallel storylines as you want, but your book (or series) still only illustrates one single moral premise. The moral premise is what bundles a bunch of otherwise unrelated narrative strands that would better have been presented as separate publications into a ...


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An interesting option I have noticed used, in mostly older movies, is the late introduction of, ultimately, the most important character. For instance, there might be a multi-character story set on a moving train in which various characters act out their specific issues (one's nervous about seeing family, another's heading to a new job, etc.) and they each ...



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