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This wasn't a "death," but a resignation, that had a similar effect. I once had a boss who people expected to go to the top. He left for a better job, and just about everyone in his "sector" was sorry to him go. We all felt that he had very big shoes to fill. That was in fact the case. But his departure created opportunities for no less than five people ...


0

First, direct world building and character building goes out. "Show, don't tell" becomes your first commandment and you dive right into story progression, establishing the world, characters and mood as a side-effects of the plot. A man in a spacesuit, riding on a camel through a desert is worthy two pages of traditional worldbuilding. Give him scars, a ...


2

The most important thing (the only important thing?) is the end result--and that someone reads it. Of course, the process to get there is important, because, duh, it's how we get there! But any way you do it, if it turns out good, it's a good process. It's your process! Imitation is important - feel free to pick and choose from other people's processes - ...


3

Some people talk about Plotters vs. Pantsters. A Plotter works out the whole book, chapter by chapter, point by point, then writes to the outline. It takes a long time up front, but then writing can progress quite quickly. A Pantster, on the other hand, writes by the seat of his or her pants, sitting down, clearing his mind, and then writing what comes. ...


0

I find it odd that some writers scope out their story, beginning to end, before writing it. Where's the fun in that? I never know how my stories will end. I learn about the end as the characters do. The ending flows naturally from the characters' actions through the story and their, well, their characters. I can't prescribe an ending on the story, and on ...


0

You don't have to know how it ends, but you do have to know how it begins. It begins with some pain, some longing, some need, some disturbance in the equanimity of life that forces some deep deviation from the ordinary course of affairs. You don't have to know how the deviation will end, or even what course it will take, but you have to know what it is ...


3

For me, it doesn't matter whether I know where a story is going or not, because I can only type so fast. I love to flesh out characters and plot out outlines while I'm preparing to write, but once I start writing, all bets are off. The finished product rarely looks like I thought it would as I started typing the opening scene. That used to bother me, but ...


8

Lots of writers start writing with no idea where it will go, much less how it will end. Dean Wesley Smith has a book about that, called Writing Into the Dark. On the other hand, I once heard Richard North Patterson claim that "Any mystery writer who starts without knowing the end is committing authorial malpractice." (The next time I read one of his books, ...


2

Not all writers know exactly where they're going when they start writing. Sometimes, they don't even know what the first turning point will be until they pick up the pen, or get on the computer, and start typing/writing. If you're not quite sure about the story-line yet, then maybe starting the first chapter is exactly what you need to do to get the creative ...


2

I'd guess this isn't a romance novel :) As you've said, the character's death sets events in motion that wouldn't have happened otherwise. You're giving your other characters the opportunity to react to that; you're giving yourself plenty of opportunity for other sudden changes (shifting of allegiances, strong characters giving up, weak characters finding ...


2

I write a lot of tiny stories. There are no rules about what they can and can't do, but usually mine focus on a single moment. I include minimal descriptions and minimal dialog, when necessary. I usually write the event then add little bits of the surrounding story: why did it happen and what were the repercussions. The best advice is probably to read a ...


10

There is one rule in writing from which everything else stems: you write for the reader. However, from that rule, you can deduce that if you turn out a novel that you know could have been better, you are cheating the reader from reading it. You've examined other possible routes which do not include the character's death, but you've found that none of them ...


2

This is the key: these alternatives don't quite deliver the same effect If the alternatives don't create the effect you want in the reader, they're not good alternatives. If killing the character creates the effect you want in the reader, kill the character. Trust your instincts. You're a storyteller. You know what you are doing.


-4

Of course! If people don't die, it's rather unrealistic in my opinion.


1

This seems to be a problem for a lot of writer. My advice is to incorporate as many as you can with the story still making sense. The rest just need to be discarded, or put into another that story. Hope this helped!



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