Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You can approach this from two directions: DIY, as outlined in Monica's answer. Use basic XML tools and the DITA Open Toolkit. Up-front cost can be low, but expect to spend a lot of time getting it to work the way you want. Support for content reuse will be minimal. Get an integrated solution. The one I know of is Author-it. This combines an authoring ...


2

This is one of the main functions of the program, ClicheCleaner, which highlights passages in your text that are either cliches, other overly-used common expressions, or phrases of your own that you have repeatedly used within the same document. ClicheCleaner includes a list of nearly 7000 unique cliches and common expressions that are compared against your ...


2

DITA is an XML format, so any editor or IDE that supports XML will work for you. Options with good XML support range from Eclipse (free) to Oxygen and Epic (several hundred dollars per seat). Of course, anybody who's comfortable getting up close and personal with the XML can use Emacs, vim, or Notepad++, too. (Don't laugh; I write all my XML and HTML in ...


1

As @user3467349 states, regular expressions (regexes) are your (complicated) friend. There's quite a learning curve involved, but it's worth it if you have to do any significant amount of text searching or modification. Many tools support their use (and some use slightly different dialects for their syntax). If you have access to a Linux system (where it ...


2

It depends how much you want to get into it and how big the project is. If it's finding only identical phrases or text, most word processors support this, and finally a lot of programming ide's support regular-expression searching (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression). On the other hand if you are looking to find reworded or similar paragraphs ...


0

And what about characters per page? As far as i remember a "standard page" is 1800 characters including spaces, no matter how many words it is (though it should be around 250 words). Have you tried to count characters?


0

I have the same problem--though 700 words double-spaced seems unlikely, so I assume you mean single spaced (and while 350 words a page is a lot, I'm generally looking at 430 words per page)--but it is NOT because you're using small words. In fact, the opposite is likely to be true--you're using bigger words in lieu of a bunch of smaller words. Go ahead and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included