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8

A standard manuscript page has about 250 words on average. Standard manuscript format is this (or a minor variation): 8.5" x 11" 1" margins top and bottom, left and right. 12 point Courier font. Double spaced. If you have significantly more or fewer than that on average, your document is likely not formatted in the standard manuscript form. Here are a ...


5

Allow me to introduce you to Scrivener. Scrivener is a word processor which allows you to create unlimited documents within a single project, and organize them into folders. You can have each book project as a folder, and within a book folder have multiple subfolders. You can see all your documents in a nice document tree in a side pane. You can drag ...


5

For layout: Scribe is a free open source page layout program. For typesetting: you can use LaTex to typeset your book. For writing: I would recommend Scrivener. If you need a free program, use LibreOffice or Openoffice. Do you have $5? Lots of artists and cover designers advertise on fiverr.com. Many offer high quality work. If you want to get your text ...


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It would be hard to answer this question without being an agent or an editor. I'm sure each individual agent, editor, and publisher has his or her own criteria in evaluating a manuscript and considering either taking on the writer as a client or publishing the manuscript. Regardless of the individual's personal criteria or preferences, the one common thread ...


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Professional typesetters usually use Adobe InDesign. I write novels in a program called Scrivener. I normally export from Scrivener directly into MOBI and EPUB (for ebooks), which is supported by Scrivener. For my print books, I would normally export from Scrivener into Microsoft Word, and then give the Word file to my designer, who would use InDesign. ...


3

DITA is an XML format, so any editor or IDE that supports XML will work for you. Options with good XML support range from Eclipse (free) to Oxygen and Epic (several hundred dollars per seat). Of course, anybody who's comfortable getting up close and personal with the XML can use Emacs, vim, or Notepad++, too. (Don't laugh; I write all my XML and HTML in ...


3

I use git for fiction. Sometimes I'll save versions at various milestones, such as when I finish a chapter). But more often I forget, and save a version only when I finish a draft. Some other times that I save versions: Before and after I apply my editor's edits. When I finish creating a book cover, book interior file, or epub file. Whenever I want to try ...


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As a student, you will be faced with not only storing your own writings, but storing other information (articles you read, graphics, web links) as well – and in a meaningful way that allows you to later find what you know that you already know but can't quite remember. Many academics use information management solutions (see also: Personal Knowledge Base) ...


2

Google Drive / Google Docs Google Drive and Google Docs work together perfectly for what you are looking for. If you sign up for a Google account you get 15GB of free storage and you can use Drive just like a File Explorer. 15 GB of Space - Free Next, you just create your Google documents, write up your articles and then later when you want to find all ...


2

Sounds like Scrivener might work nicely for you. You write your pieces in text, you can add graphics, you can view your pieces either in a list or as graphics which you can tag, and you can organize your individual pieces in folders. You can download a fully-operational demo and use it for 30 days. Search for Scrivener on this site to see other discussions ...


2

After reading the question and answer that Joel Bosveld linked to in his comment, I installed Git to do version control of the novel I was writing. If find the idea of version control intriguing, because I often rewrite parts of my fiction only to realize that a previous version contained some great phrases that I'd like to reuse but can not remember and ...


2

You can approach this from two directions: DIY, as outlined in Monica's answer. Use basic XML tools and the DITA Open Toolkit. Up-front cost can be low, but expect to spend a lot of time getting it to work the way you want. Support for content reuse will be minimal. Get an integrated solution. The one I know of is Author-it. This combines an authoring ...


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This is one of the main functions of the program, ClicheCleaner, which highlights passages in your text that are either cliches, other overly-used common expressions, or phrases of your own that you have repeatedly used within the same document. ClicheCleaner includes a list of nearly 7000 unique cliches and common expressions that are compared against your ...


2

It depends how much you want to get into it and how big the project is. If it's finding only identical phrases or text, most word processors support this, and finally a lot of programming ide's support regular-expression searching (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression). On the other hand if you are looking to find reworded or similar paragraphs ...


2

When looking for tools like these, future-compatibility is a very big issue. First off, try to avoid any tools that have their own proprietary format and can't be edited using any other tool (look what happened to many 80s document files which were written using their own editors and the editors suddenly just vanished). Microsoft Office is also one such ...


1

There is a great free novel writing tool available, it's called yWriter and it can be downloaded from spacejock.com. It's not an online tool but it if you need it on the go it can be run from a usb pen drive. The only free and online tools I can think of are litlift which is at litlift.com and Hiveword from hiveword.com and Inklewriter which is at ...


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I start my documents as "NameOfDocument 000.doc" (or similar, depends on software being used.) Every time I start a writing/editing session on the document, I do a "Save As" and increment the number, before doing anything else. I find the Undo/Redo commands to be sufficient within a session. Exception: If I'm about to perform major surgery, e.g., ...


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I think git is a bit overkill, because you have to remember to commit it all the time it does not just happen like after a save. Options that I can think of Google Docs it has a Revision History view Microsoft word has Track Changes (I don't know much but one site I found ...


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As @user3467349 states, regular expressions (regexes) are your (complicated) friend. There's quite a learning curve involved, but it's worth it if you have to do any significant amount of text searching or modification. Many tools support their use (and some use slightly different dialects for their syntax). If you have access to a Linux system (where it ...


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I would also suggest that Scrivener is worth a look. It has a good keyword and tagging system, including custom metadata. It also has a flexible search system. I have moved most of my writing from Word into Scrivener over the last year, because of the type of organization (and reorganization) it allows. The downside to Scrivener, in my view, is that while it ...


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If your needs are basic: 1) low cost 2) collection of documents 3) links between them Then it sounds like simple HTML files could do the trick. But if you want more, you could consider storing documents in something like Google Docs. You can add links to other Google docs within a document and Google Docs keeps track of revisions made. It also has basic ...


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Well, in my case, fandom magazine, we decided to put the final layouting inside Scribus which is open source and available for all operating systems. For documents sharing, we use Facebook closed group, becase it offers: Document upload (for writing texts we use either Libre Office or MS Ofice) Discussion for every document version And of course, document ...


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I use Aeon Timeline to keep track of chronology (it integrates well with Scrivener, which I use for writing), and I do everythong else on paper. Maybe this is because I did my first writing projects before the advent of the personal computer and had to type my first essays for university on a typewriter. To me, paper outlining has one gigantic advantage: ...


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In Final Draft 7, if you run the ScriptCompare tool (Tools > ScriptCompare) against the previous day's file, it generates a document that shows the changes from that version. You could send the changes file, along with the latest screenplay file, to your writing partner - or your writing partner could generate the changes file him/herself against their ...


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LaTeX is the way to go. MS Word has improved a lot since the beginning (at least, so I'v been told, because I personally don't use it), but for equations and few other things (e.g. microkerning) it cannot compete with LaTeX. Adobe InDesign is more for professional typographers than writers. Typically publishers of technical books provide to their authors ...



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