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12

None of them. There is no commercial grammar checker that I know of which even approaches the ability of a halfway-competent native speaker. If you're thinking that grammar-checking software will help you with your typos and grammar mistakes, think again. This is one thing that still requires human intelligence.


8

I use paper and a pencil. Paper is extremely flexible. You can: cut out sections and re-arrange them in any way you want (even stack them) have an infinite canvas (as large as your living-room floor) see everything you wrote at the same time and therefore better grasp and play with it in your mind than when only a small section of your work is visible on ...


7

Any decent word processor software will allow you to insert cross-references. I've used this quite frequently in Microsoft Word when writing technical documentation for software. It produces a link that the user can simply Ctrl-click to navigate. You can link to a variety of different items within the document. If you export the document as a PDF the ...


6

Allow me to introduce you to Scrivener. Scrivener is a word processor which allows you to create unlimited documents within a single project, and see all your documents in a nice document tree in a side pane. You can create folders and subfolders, drag items around from here to there, link documents within the project, tag documents for easy searching, and ...


6

Let's break down your illustrative sentence: Users can delete Servers This statement describes a capability -- users can perform this action. I'm hard-pressed to imagine how a different tense could be used here. Some technical writers (or style guides) make this overly passive -- "the system supports user deletion of servers" or some such. Speaking ...


5

LaTeX for writing books - especially for writing scientific books, with equations or technical drawings - is what HTML is to writing webpages. It's a metalanguage which will get your formatting right, it allows you to write complex equations fluently, moving sections of text will not make the whole thing collapse terribly, and while for things like an essay ...


4

Almost every computing platform now supports some form of speech recognition software. If you can read your own handwriting, then that offers a cheap and relatively painless way of getting your draft into a text file. Obviously you should test the software you choose on a few paragraphs before committing to reading in all 25 pages. Some applications have a ...


3

The number one rule is always to ask your publisher what file types they can handle. If you self-publish, ask your printer. Many publishers expect one file per chapter. This will also reduce the individual file size and make it easier to handle for you on your system. If you self-publish, you might want to get a decent desktop publishing software such as ...


3

Using LaTeX is unlikely to enhance your writing (or to detract either, as long as you start out with a complete and properly-formatted example LaTeX file and merely add your paragraphs separated by two linefeeds). Generally the LaTeX process should have little effect on the writing quality, but if you aren't familiar with LaTeX commands you may initially ...


3

I see that you've decided to go with the PDF option. Not sure that's what I would do because PDF is a standard that carries a bit more baggage than other formats. I'm not sure about .mobi but I know .epub is just basically common or garden HTML dressed up with a few more tags. As such you can fill it with hyperlinks. I guess .mobi must be similar as you'll ...


3

Consider Trello which I believe will support everything you want (except the daily posting of topics, and even that should not be too difficult to automate). It is a project management tool for teams that allows you to define any categories you wish for tasks (such as new topics, claimed topics, drafts submitted, payment negotiated, published etc) and to ...


3

You won't like this answer, but I'm going to give it anyway. The best way to convert handwriting into text is to type it up. Don't skip it just because it's a little tedious. Typing up work is a valuable opportunity for engaging with each word and sentence of the text. Scanning over the text on the screen isn't the same thing. I always use the typing-up ...


3

This is an old thread, but maybe this contribution will still be helpful: I've written several books using emacs, and am also the author of the Woodnotes Guide for Emacs for Writers (not Coders) 1 and produced a cheatsheet 2 of commands and settings I find useful. Both are totally free/Creative Commons licensed. If you're curious, on the same site you'll ...


2

I'm not sure that this is a choice that you really have to make -- there are services that will do these conversions for you. I saw a presentation at the Digital Minds Conference 2013 by Autharium that seemed to be suitable. (I'm not associated with them, just in the general publishing software business area).


2

The operating system you are using is probably going to limit your options to some extent or other. If you are using MacOS or Windows I would highly recommend Scrivener. You could create a blank project with a single "card" for each of your 50 fields - Scrivener provides a live word and character count for content as you type and has numerous options ...


2

I have written a tool for my own use that will almost do what you want, but I hadn't thought that anyone else would use it, so it is a bit rough around the edges, it would only take me a couple minutes to add wdiff to it, but it assumes POSIX (unix/linux/OSX) is written in perl, has no documentation, and the command syntax is arcane. Would you like to try it ...


2

I've always used mindmaps as a way to quickly brainstorm (and more importantly, organize/reshuffle) my thoughts. Freemind is the app I've used for many years, but its a bit clunky. Recently I've started using MindMup, which is browser based and allows you to store your documents in Google Drive, or in Dropbox.


2

Answer from Kai Rosenkranz "Nevigo Developer" in the Steam thread Articy: Just for games? Thanks for your interest. Between 10 and 20 percent of our customers use articy:draft for other purposes than designing games, like novelists, screenwriters, and instructional designers (for game-based training, ...ok, that may count as game design :) ). Based on ...


2

LaTeX is a fantastic piece of software. I do all my text writing in it - papers, letters, etc. People are known to get totally addicted to it. Wander over to tex.stackexchange.com, and you'll find lots of such people there. There is some overhead involved in learning it. However, this overhead is mostly caused by things like graphics and mathematics. A ...


2

How about Powerpoint (or similar)? Advantage over word-processors is you have "slides" that you can move about. Slides can contain pictures or text. You can label each slide with a large label. Then you can look at a bunch of slides in "slide view" and rearrange them. Disadvantage is that this only has two levels of organization. [i.e., You can ...


1

Microsoft Word includes machine translation features - it can translate selections or entire documents; see this page for more details. You'll likely need to install a bilingual dictionary package.


1

You can link to images in Word. When you insert an image, you get a dialog where you can select the image. The 'Insert' button in this dialog is actually a drop-down menu. One of the menu choices is 'Link to file'. There are two basic workflows when publishing a book: the writer supplies the text and images to the publisher, and the publisher creates ...


1

The most natural way to write is writing "surface text": text that looks the way you want it to look. If you want to emphasize a word, you want to see it emphasized. Because that is the text you are writing. LaTeX (or HTML or the markup behind a Word document) are not text. They are commands that tell an interpreting software what the text should be. You ...


1

I've found Translation Table for LibreOffice this is not an advanced tool but for little works is useful: Translation Table creates a two column table, where in the first column you get the source text segmented by sentence, each sentence in a cell, and in the second column you can put your translated sentences, each one in opposite cells to the ...


1

TiddlyWiki is my choice. It's a free-as-in-beer single-page wiki system in the form of a single HTML file you open with your favorite browser and edit via clicking on links to create new sections called Tiddlers. You can build out chapters, and internal links, and categorize different types of articles. Works great, but depends on a Java plug-in so YMMV ...


1

I use the Gollum wiki. It works well for me. There's no database, just wiki-formatted text files. It uses the git version control system so you have a history of every change you make (and you don't have to know how to use git, it does it all for you). Very nice and extremely simple to use - you just start it up and do all your edits in a web browser. The ...


1

The general approach you are required to take is called "topic-based writing". It's a controversial field and there are mountains of material online about it. The most well-known tool is an XML specification called DITA. DITA is supported by numerous applications. I recommend using oXygen Author. Since you have already been given a tool to work with, the ...


1

I checked few tool like Grammarly, specllcheckplus, writing dynamo and white smoke. I felt white smoke is worst of all. Grammarly, specllcheckplus and writing dynamo are compete very closely, but I found Grammarly is better than both specllcheckplus and writing dynamo. Still Grammarly doesn't catch all the issues, it catches at least to some extend. Also ...


1

I recommend the book World-Building -- A writer's guide to constructing star systems and life-supporting planets, by Stephen L. Gillett. The author has a PhD in geology, and so he covers topics like plate tectonics, water and air, magnetic fields, colors, etc. The book also covers various aspects of planets and stars, orbits, gravity, seasons and tidal ...


1

Recently, I made Scribodroid. It is a program for synonyms, collocations, rhymes and definitions. It searches online dictionaries and works as a pop-up tool in any word editing program. It can be very useful sometimes.



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