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8

I use paper and a pencil. Paper is extremely flexible. You can: cut out sections and re-arrange them in any way you want (even stack them) have an infinite canvas (as large as your living-room floor) see everything you wrote at the same time and therefore better grasp and play with it in your mind than when only a small section of your work is visible on ...


7

Let's break down your illustrative sentence: Users can delete Servers This statement describes a capability -- users can perform this action. I'm hard-pressed to imagine how a different tense could be used here. Some technical writers (or style guides) make this overly passive -- "the system supports user deletion of servers" or some such. Speaking ...


7

Allow me to introduce you to Scrivener. Scrivener is a word processor which allows you to create unlimited documents within a single project, and see all your documents in a nice document tree in a side pane. You can create folders and subfolders, drag items around from here to there, link documents within the project, tag documents for easy searching, and ...


7

Why do films need master copies? Because playing a movie, or even copying it, involves the film (i.e. the physical celluloid strip) to be dragged through a machine, and this handling causes abrasion, scratches, and with time destroys the film. So instead of copying the original film a thousand times for all the cinemas out there and in this process ...


5

LaTeX for writing books - especially for writing scientific books, with equations or technical drawings - is what HTML is to writing webpages. It's a metalanguage which will get your formatting right, it allows you to write complex equations fluently, moving sections of text will not make the whole thing collapse terribly, and while for things like an essay ...


5

For layout: Scribe is a free open source page layout program. For typesetting: you can use LaTex to typeset your book. For writing: I would recommend Scrivener. If you need a free program, use LibreOffice or Openoffice. Do you have $5? Lots of artists and cover designers advertise on fiverr.com. Many offer high quality work. If you want to get your text ...


5

Allow me to introduce you to Scrivener. Scrivener is a word processor which allows you to create unlimited documents within a single project, and organize them into folders. You can have each book project as a folder, and within a book folder have multiple subfolders. You can see all your documents in a nice document tree in a side pane. You can drag ...


4

I love Scrivener for this kind of thing. You can put each thought onto an individual page, and then drag them around as you see fit. It even has a virtual corkboard screen so you can see many individual notes at a glance.


3

Using LaTeX is unlikely to enhance your writing (or to detract either, as long as you start out with a complete and properly-formatted example LaTeX file and merely add your paragraphs separated by two linefeeds). Generally the LaTeX process should have little effect on the writing quality, but if you aren't familiar with LaTeX commands you may initially ...


3

The number one rule is always to ask your publisher what file types they can handle. If you self-publish, ask your printer. Many publishers expect one file per chapter. This will also reduce the individual file size and make it easier to handle for you on your system. If you self-publish, you might want to get a decent desktop publishing software such as ...


3

This is an old thread, but maybe this contribution will still be helpful: I've written several books using emacs, and am also the author of the Woodnotes Guide for Emacs for Writers (not Coders) 1 and produced a cheatsheet 2 of commands and settings I find useful. Both are totally free/Creative Commons licensed. If you're curious, on the same site you'll ...


3

Have you tried Scrivener? I haven't used it for screenwriting, but it looks like it's got a great tool for it. It's not open source, but $45 is fairly cheap.


3

I believe you need a nonbreaking hyphen. It'll keep the characters before and after it from breaking across lines. From Butterick's Practical Typography: Your word proces­sor as­sumes that any hy­phen marks a safe place to flow the text onto a new line or page. Sim­i­lar to the non­break­ing space, the non­break­ing hy­phen looks iden­ti­cal to a ...


3

Professional typesetters usually use Adobe InDesign. I write novels in a program called Scrivener. I normally export from Scrivener directly into MOBI and EPUB (for ebooks), which is supported by Scrivener. For my print books, I would normally export from Scrivener into Microsoft Word, and then give the Word file to my designer, who would use InDesign. ...


2

I have written a tool for my own use that will almost do what you want, but I hadn't thought that anyone else would use it, so it is a bit rough around the edges, it would only take me a couple minutes to add wdiff to it, but it assumes POSIX (unix/linux/OSX) is written in perl, has no documentation, and the command syntax is arcane. Would you like to try it ...


2

I've always used mindmaps as a way to quickly brainstorm (and more importantly, organize/reshuffle) my thoughts. Freemind is the app I've used for many years, but its a bit clunky. Recently I've started using MindMup, which is browser based and allows you to store your documents in Google Drive, or in Dropbox.


2

LaTeX is a fantastic piece of software. I do all my text writing in it - papers, letters, etc. People are known to get totally addicted to it. Wander over to tex.stackexchange.com, and you'll find lots of such people there. There is some overhead involved in learning it. However, this overhead is mostly caused by things like graphics and mathematics. A ...


2

Final Draft is the most common one that I know of. But it's not free. Once you've finished your script and want industry people to read it, you'll need a recognized script formatting program like Final Draft or Movie Magic.


2

Since we never put anything out on a public server, aka Cloud, I don't know if Trelby is what you need or not. On the bright side, it's FREE, so no harm in taking a look to see. I've never heard of Plotbot, but have used Celtx. The number one screenwriting software is Final Draft. It is expensive, crashes often, and not universal among platforms. For this ...


2

How about Powerpoint (or similar)? Advantage over word-processors is you have "slides" that you can move about. Slides can contain pictures or text. You can label each slide with a large label. Then you can look at a bunch of slides in "slide view" and rearrange them. Disadvantage is that this only has two levels of organization. [i.e., You can ...


1

You can search based on ASCII char codes. ASCII for single quote will be 39 So you search for single quote as ^039


1

I would rewrite that sentence completely as: You may delete servers that do not have customers assigned to them. Note that I also removed the unnecessary capitaliztion.


1

I needed a tool that worked on my iPad, iPhone as well as on my Mac, and not having experience with Scrivener, I used Storyist. I wrote a quick review here While it is likely not as polished as Scrivener, I really needed universal access, and it synching with drop box was a key feature for me. Here are the highlights of the points from my experience with ...


1

Sadly I've been relying on Yahoo notepad which is free but terrible and I've been looking to upgrade. I think in my case the solution is Microsoft OneNote Online. It is completely free and it is hosted online so I can access it from any of my devices which is great when I'm 'on the go'. It has the ability to create sections and pages which can organize ...


1

Microsoft Word includes machine translation features - it can translate selections or entire documents; see this page for more details. You'll likely need to install a bilingual dictionary package.


1

You can link to images in Word. When you insert an image, you get a dialog where you can select the image. The 'Insert' button in this dialog is actually a drop-down menu. One of the menu choices is 'Link to file'. There are two basic workflows when publishing a book: the writer supplies the text and images to the publisher, and the publisher creates ...


1

The most natural way to write is writing "surface text": text that looks the way you want it to look. If you want to emphasize a word, you want to see it emphasized. Because that is the text you are writing. LaTeX (or HTML or the markup behind a Word document) are not text. They are commands that tell an interpreting software what the text should be. You ...


1

I've found Translation Table for LibreOffice this is not an advanced tool but for little works is useful: Translation Table creates a two column table, where in the first column you get the source text segmented by sentence, each sentence in a cell, and in the second column you can put your translated sentences, each one in opposite cells to the ...


1

Wikipedia lists a selection of computer-assisted translation tools. You might also try to search your favourite search engine for "translation workstation" or "translator's workstation".


1

TiddlyWiki is my choice. It's a free-as-in-beer single-page wiki system in the form of a single HTML file you open with your favorite browser and edit via clicking on links to create new sections called Tiddlers. You can build out chapters, and internal links, and categorize different types of articles. Works great, but depends on a Java plug-in so YMMV ...



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