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4

You haven't specified any preferences for format (source or output), and that's going to be relevant. If it's up to you, for your source I recommend a text (not binary-format) markup language -- HTML, XML, LaTeX, or similar. A text source works well with source control, works with grep/find/search, and supports meaningful diff. All of these (assuming a ...


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I'm also a big FOSS supporter, and I detest using Microsoft products for many reasons. That said, here's a fairly hardnosed take on the subject, from Charles Stross, a very successful author and sound thinker - who is also a FOSS advocate: Why Microsoft Word Must Die MS made what seems like an intensely stupid engineering decision about visual formatting:...


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Personally, I don't get that complex. I write non-fiction, which I'm sure is a different process from fiction. I start out by throwing a bunch of notes into an MS Word document. Basically a collection of "here are things I want to talk about". Initially I don't worry about order, structure or consistency. For some things I may just put a sentence or a ...


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Print Edition If you want to publish a paperback edition, you can use CreateSpace or other print-on-demand (POD) service. CreateSpace (and maybe the others) take no money up front. They take a cut of each sale. And the retailer takes a cut of each sale. You set the retail price, and your royalty is whatever is left over after CreateSpace and the retailer ...


2

Here are two examples of how "e.g." has been used in scientific articles: In the first passage the authors explain who they excluded from their study. "e.g." is used to give examples of medication. Exclusion criteria included psychiatric or neurological conditions that could be associated with secondary bruxism, use of medications that may have an ...


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Scrivener is a fantastic tool that's also a remarkably well-written piece of software. The programmer deserves recompense for his effort. Neither Word nor Evernote nor OneNote are sufficiently similar to Scrivener to merit comparison. Look at the Literature and Latte website. Read about it. Check out Gwen Hernandez site; she's an expert on Scrivener. Yes, it ...


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A common text editor/publishing platform within the (academic) computer scoience community is Latex.


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Ideally, the reviewers don’t get to do any editing, no matter what the workflow. Even if they just want to see a small change like uppercasing a word, it is better if they just put in a comment and you make the changes. Or not, if you have a reason to reject the proposed change. That way you can maintain strict control of your master document. Again, no ...


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We are currently working on Plotist, a timeline software created for writers. It's still a beta, but anyone can sign up and try it out. The main feature is that it connects notes and visualization, so you can check and edit your notes while building the timeline.


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It depends, but probably you want the distributed approach where the chapter on X tells you everything you need to know about X, even if some of that is only relevant if you're using feature Y. However, if Y is a corner case or involves a lot of changes to several other features, you might be better off collecting everything about Y in one place and linking ...


2

Windows will already do this for you if you just turn on the search contents option. -Open any folder -Go to Tools / Folder Options -Select the Search Tab -Check the radio button for Always search file names and contents. The search will take longer than normal and the results aren't going to be really beautiful, but it'll give you what you want. If ...


2

I use Evernote and MS One Note for all of my writing work. You can make separate/unlimited notebooks for everything, save web pages and items from the web. You are also able to search all your text in both. You are able to make audio files in both that you are also able to search. In Evernote, you are able to create tags for all of your work that makes ...


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My beloved Scrivener does the job beautifully. Paste your text in and then go under Project —> Text Statistics and it gives you the list you're looking for. Other people on this board have recommended Word Counter (Mac) and both Primitive Word Counter and yWriter (Windows), but I cannot speak to their utility as I've never used them.


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Scrivener does all of what you're asking for. You can color code documents. You can organize documents in an outline, in a "corkboard," in various collections and categories, and in a hierarchy. You can create keywords represent anything that interests you (characters, locations, plot threads, themes, ...), tag each document with the relevant keywords, and ...


1

Using OpenOffice, which is free, but somewhat awkward, you may File/Insert a "frame", designate its alignment (page/paragraph/etc.) and position (left margin, right margin, outside mirrored, inside mirrored). The text that you type inside this frame can be formatted just like anything else, size, color, etc. You can insert picture(s) into this frame in ...


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Etherpad. It has Commenting PLUS change proposals PLUS attribution Output as plaintext (even better than Markdown for the workflow) Collaboration in realtime with color coding Minimal WYSIWYG A local installation for security


1

Draft seems to satisfy your requirements. The versioning process is done by drafting (hence the name) but it's almost the same thing.


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How do your users read and use the manual? If they use it as a textbook, where 95% of the readers start at the beginning and progress through to the end in linear fashion, then put all the new information into one chapter at the end. If they use it as a reference book, so chapters are read out of order, individually, or not even in total because the person ...


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Grammarly - It is web based, but also has browser and Word plugins. It will check all manner of grammar errors


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That very much depends on what you need to write with. If you need the likes of Scrivener then you are going to have some issues working efficiently on a Chromebook (I'm not sure what Chrome apps there are) However, if you can adapt your writing style to what you have available you will find that there are many tools available. Personally I have found ...


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The CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE recommends excluding them except in situations where it is legally required (e g., paid, competitive advertising or if you work for the company).


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Plotist is not exactly what you are looking for, but it's worth having a look. It's a timeline application aimed at writers, where you can create your notes about characters and locations and use them to create a timeline. I'm the main developer and it's currently under development, but we are already sending invitations to try it.


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This has nothing to do with the source control, so the GIT support in V11 and 12 is a red herring. There is no better way of doing this, as of version 12 (April 2016). What you are doing and your work around are the only two ways I know of doing what you want. In our group, we use Track Changes for the changes that we want the author to review. We don't ...


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I would say that the newest, and in my view most promising, trend in in the use of lightweight markup languages, specifically Markdown, reStructuredText, and ASCIIDoc. Both commercial WYSIWYG tools like FrameMaker and XML vocabularies like DocBook and DITA require complex and somewhat cumbersome editors and tend to clutter the writing experience with ...



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