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For a story, you need a character in a setting with a problem. You can start from any of those elements and develop the others. If you have an interesting character in an interesting setting with an interesting problem, it makes absolutely no difference in what order you developed them. If you have a setting, find a character with a problem in that setting, ...


2

I don't see any problem with that approach. Much of sci fi and fantasy is setting first. What you need, though, is an engaging story to take place in that setting. Something that is interesting independent of where it takes place. Something like love, war, political intrigue, or the problems of teens growing up. What it is is irrelevant and will depend on ...


1

Well, actually you do have it kind of backwards, but not really in a bad way. The basic progress for scifi in idealized case is to first come up with the concept. Then come up with the theme, which aspect of your basic concept you want to explore and how. Then think of a story that does that. And develop the setting as normal for the story. So in theory ...


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In this setting, maybe a collection of short stories, each exploring a different facet of these changes, could be an interesting format. I'm thinking of something like "After the quake" by Haruki Murakami, or "I robot" by Isaac Asimov.


5

If you have a story to tell, it should be possible to tell that story in your setting. If all you have is a setting, you need to find your story first. What you should avoid doing is setting your story in your setting and then not really using that setting to inform the story. If you're telling a story about, say, the politics of the international ...



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