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12

Really simple answer is this: Write one book. Tie up all the loose ends. Make it one complete story. But imagine it as book one of a series. Don't let we the reader know that -- it should be undetectable to us, but you will know there's potential for a series. When sending to agents and publishers ensure you include the golden words: "Stand-alone novel ...


8

That is a tricky question, there is a good reason for a cliffhanger at the end of the first book to increase the interest in the second one, but that might be hard if it's your first book sale. I think the best way to go about it, at least in the case of your first book, is to hint that there is something bigger in the background. Both through out the book ...


8

After short brainstorming and small talk with myself, here is what I got: 1) You are inventing the next part of arc while working on current. While writing I frequently experienced a feeling that told me: "Yes, I'm going to use this in the further scene\book". If you feel so, you already should have a next-things list, and put all resembling feelings there....


7

This is kinda obvious but it does definitely affect breaking up the story, so I think it deserves emphasis. Being a recent graduate from the Young Adult market, I strongly recommend that you divide it in such a way that each standalone book ends on some kind of incredibly surprising cliffhanger, or an ending that has the reader ferociously needing to know ...


7

Okay, the usual disclaimer first: Everything I say is true only for the most common, average case. In publishing, everything is possible. The more it deviates from the norm, the rarer it will become. But that does not mean it is impossible. There are one volume editions of the Lord of the Rings or the Bible. This is proof that big fat books of over a ...


6

The examples of Paolini and Rowling are not useful as blueprint for a different reason than that stated in the comments: they are exceptions. Overwhelming success is rare, not the rule. It happens to a small percentage of published works only, and you cannot plan it. What you can plan, though, is a more moderate, general success. And this depends largely on ...


6

The good news is that there's nobody policing this! You can call your series anything you want — just like naming your individual books, you're looking for whatever you think will best serve the series and appeal to prospective readers. 'Trilogy', 'quadrilogy' etc. obviously have technical meanings So does 'sequence' (See Wikipedia) Terry Pratchett simply ...


5

There isn't a one-fits-all answer here. Generally speaking, your personal talent/skills in seeing and imagining connections will allow you less effort (and "work"/"formula"/"method") in devising them. It doesn't make you a better or worse writer to have that gift, but it certainly makes your job easier. If you want a couple of tips on how to be able to ...


4

There are two kinds of series: (a) What is really one very long story that is broken into pieces for convenience or marketing purposes. That is, if a story takes 1000 pages, rather than try to sell one 1000-page book, we instead make a trilogy and sell three 330-page books. This makes each book more manageable and makes pricing more realistic. Etc. (b) A ...


3

Tell more stories. If you've built a world, put sentient beings in it and put conflicts in front of them. Let the world unfold in front of your characters, and let the characters talk about the other parts of the world, and the history of it, which haven't been discussed before. Write stories set long before or shortly after your existing series. Link it ...


3

J K Rowling said that she imagined her entire story nearly all at once in one sitting. That means that while the readers were doled out a single book at a time, she basically had one giant story, broken up into seven parts. If you think about it that way, connecting all of the stories together is not much more complicated than connecting elements between ...


3

Based on their guidelines for requesting an ISSN, I would try their contact email and ask for confirmation: issnic@issn.org . Let us know if that works :)


3

There are often similarities in plot. Some people make it obvious and acknowledge the source of their inspiration. "West Side Story," for example, is Romeo and Juliet set in New York City in the 1950s. Some authors steal unintentionally when they should know better. The plot in Woody Allen's "Small Time Crooks" (2000) is nearly identical to the plot in ...


3

I am sorry I'm a budding contributor here so I don't have comment permissions. Just to confirm you are writing something like The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, right? Where each series has its own books in different time frame. If yes then that's a massive project and wouldn't be bound by something like trilogy or any of that sort. Saga being a long ...


2

Disclaimer: I've never actually written a series before. I just had a project I was working on kind of explode. It was originally intended to be a short story -- just a pre-NaNoWriMo writing exercise. Then all of a sudden, I realized that I had too many notes for a short story -- this would be a novella if not a full-fledged novel. I started laying out ...


2

You're probably fine. In all actuality, they probably won't even be aware of your book. Instead of being afraid of being sued, worry about being called unoriginal. There are a ton of fairy-tale inspired books, especially around Snow white and Little Red Riding Hood. They're all technically derivative, but each has characterization, plot, and tone that makes ...


2

I think you would be better off writing some of the story and discovering along the way where this story fits into the grand scheme of things, or even if it does. I also have a vague plot and some momentum going in the first few chapters that I'm very excited about, but while there is likely potential for a number of stories to be extrapolated from the ...


2

The number of books in the series is irrelevant. What matters is whether you still have story to tell. JK Rowling planned the Potter series to have seven books; Harry's arc is finished. GRRMartin originally planned for four, but he's got so much to say that he's expanded to at least seven (and eight wouldn't surprise me if he lives that long). David ...


2

First of all, I think that there is no definitive answer to a question like this. Stories are different, and a mechanism that worked fine in one story might fail in another. You will have to try out what works best for your story. That being said I don't see a reason why introducing a new POV in the second book of your series should not work out. Think of ...


2

I always answer these kinds of questions from my own experiences as a reader. For me as a writer it is irrelevant, how many other authors have done this or that; the deciding factor is how I feel about it as a reader. So my first suggestion would be that you find examples of what you want to do, read them, and see how you feel about them. I can't really ...


2

The Big Flashback can work, but it's a tired cliché. The general strategy is to open with Louise fighting for her life the grip of the Acturan Octopus Tyrant, then jump back in time to her childhood in Idaho, and the strange sequence of events which will lead to her becoming Earth's one hope against the alien invaders. If I read something like this and, ...


2

I don't think it's altogether a bad idea, it depends on how you implement it. One of the ways it can be achieved is to have the present day story and the past story running in parallel. This would mean that events would need to develop for the character in prison, whilst he remembers back to what happened previously. Answering your question about the ...


2

Before trying to expend it into more than a quadrilogy, publish the first one. Make sure the book is a success and the world appreciated before spending more time on it. Even great authors sometimes create universes that do not resonate with the reader. Sometimes it is a game of try-and-miss. Better fail with one book and spend time developing another ...


2

Technically, it is simply a series. Usually, when you look at writers' bibliographies on Wikipedia, multi-cycle series are usually grouped under a heading that refers to what they all have in common. For example, several of the novels of C. J. Cherryh are grouped under "the Alliance-Union universe". In this case, "universe" is the term used to describe the ...


1

I would recommend working on Series B, Book 1 while awaiting the query/publishing phase of Series A, Book 1, before working on Series A, Book 2. However, this is for traditional publishing with the intent on being a fiction writer as a career. A traditional publication can take well over a year to hit the shelves, and it is unlikely an unheralded author ...


1

I don't think in medias res should necessarily be understood as jumping into the middle of the story. I think we should look at it more as a story is embedded in a history. You may need to understand the history in order to understand the story, but the story itself -- the character's moral arc -- does not begin at the beginning of the history. So you start ...


1

I'm currently working on a new project, what I doing is that I'm working with an outline and think of stuff that will happen in broad strokes and how it relates to other things. Personally, I found that it helps a lot if you plan backwards that way you'll have an easier time to weave different plots and helps you in foreshadowing as well, this is what works ...


1

I started out refusing to write a trilogy. I enjoy reading series, but I sometimes think writers like Christopher Paolini just needs a better editor who was willing to trim his series down into one book. I finally had to admit I was writing a trilogy because I had three very distinct stories. At the end of the first story , the characters succeed in their ...


1

The theme (I think that's what you're talking about) is something that is often part of a novel, but it's not part of the plot at all, if that makes sense. The theme is also not the concept (a vague, 7-ish word plot summary) or the premise (which is a one or two sentence description of your novel with specifics). I think that's where you're getting messed ...


1

This sounds closest to The Lord of the Rings, which is one enormous story split into three physical volumes. Each volume contains two parts which Tolkien labelled books, but Tolkien himself thought of it as one work, not three (or six). GRRMartin's fourth book of A Song of Ice and Fire (aka Game of Thrones) got so unwieldy that he split it into two, A Feast ...



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