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12

Really simple answer is this: Write one book. Tie up all the loose ends. Make it one complete story. But imagine it as book one of a series. Don't let we the reader know that -- it should be undetectable to us, but you will know there's potential for a series. When sending to agents and publishers ensure you include the golden words: "Stand-alone novel ...


8

After short brainstorming and small talk with myself, here is what I got: 1) You are inventing the next part of arc while working on current. While writing I frequently experienced a feeling that told me: "Yes, I'm going to use this in the further scene\book". If you feel so, you already should have a next-things list, and put all resembling feelings ...


8

That is a tricky question, there is a good reason for a cliffhanger at the end of the first book to increase the interest in the second one, but that might be hard if it's your first book sale. I think the best way to go about it, at least in the case of your first book, is to hint that there is something bigger in the background. Both through out the book ...


7

This is kinda obvious but it does definitely affect breaking up the story, so I think it deserves emphasis. Being a recent graduate from the Young Adult market, I strongly recommend that you divide it in such a way that each standalone book ends on some kind of incredibly surprising cliffhanger, or an ending that has the reader ferociously needing to know ...


6

The examples of Paolini and Rowling are not useful as blueprint for a different reason than that stated in the comments: they are exceptions. Overwhelming success is rare, not the rule. It happens to a small percentage of published works only, and you cannot plan it. What you can plan, though, is a more moderate, general success. And this depends largely on ...


3

Based on their guidelines for requesting an ISSN, I would try their contact email and ask for confirmation: issnic@issn.org . Let us know if that works :)


2

Disclaimer: I've never actually written a series before. I just had a project I was working on kind of explode. It was originally intended to be a short story -- just a pre-NaNoWriMo writing exercise. Then all of a sudden, I realized that I had too many notes for a short story -- this would be a novella if not a full-fledged novel. I started laying out ...


2

The number of books in the series is irrelevant. What matters is whether you still have story to tell. JK Rowling planned the Potter series to have seven books; Harry's arc is finished. GRRMartin originally planned for four, but he's got so much to say that he's expanded to at least seven (and eight wouldn't surprise me if he lives that long). David ...


1

It can be justified it is indeed a very good idea, if you want to publish it through a classic publishing house. This is because publishers prefer to try how well a book sells before committing to a full series, and finding, halfway through, it would be better (from a business point of view) to discontinue it. I am currently doing this very technique, ...


1

You can use an online ISSN checker: http://journal-index.org/ISSN-validator/


1

The Tomorrow When the War Began series is probably very similar to what you are describing. It's seven (brilliant) novels, following one major story arc. What the author, John Marsden, did was to give each story its own resolution, but still leave the reader wanting to know more. This was usually done by leaving something about a character unanswered, so ...


1

The first thing I would do is see what the normal length for a YA book is. It seems to me they are around 50k to 60k words. They can be much longer, but you have to be established. Even the first Harry Potter book was a fairly normal length of the genre. Once you know the normal length you can shoot for the first book to hit around that mark, then go from ...



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