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11

There is no way to track who buys your books on Amazon. In your books, give readers a way to connect with you. Links to your book/author/publisher web site. Link to a mailing list. Links to your social media accounts. An offer that they can sign up for (a free ebook version of the print book they bought, or a discount on another book, or a free short story ...


6

Short answer: You can't. But you shouldn't worry about it. Good textbooks get updated. They are refreshed and corrected, new material is added, things are changed to reflect reader/student/teacher feedback, and items which are no longer valid are removed. This is a good thing. I'm not saying you have to put out a new edition every year, but updating a ...


5

Dale Emery did an excellent job explaining all the different costs associated with using CreateSpace, but the bottom line is that you as the author do not have to incur any cost up front. I wanted to point out a couple of other factors that you need to take into consideration, however. First of all, don't assume that you can just convert a Word document to ...


5

I have sent eight books through CreateSpace this year, including one that I'm proofing right now. The only upfront cost is the printed proof copy, and you can forego that (though it is highly recommended). Proof Copy. CreateSpace requires that you proof your book. You may choose to do this entirely through their online proofing tool, in which case there ...


5

When I self-published a book some years ago I had the copy shop apply comb bindings for me. At the time this cost about $1/book, but it appears that Stapes and Office Depot now charge closer to $3 for this. If your print run is small, or if you are truly willing to trade time for expense, you can buy a binding machine and the plastic combs and do it ...


4

You could look into Thermal Binding. The price should be quite similar, the result looks far more professional than comb binding, although the durability is worse - if that's a book you read just one time or a few times, that's quite sufficient, but if you use it frequently, like a handbook, it will come apart. Nevertheless, the thermal binder machine is ...


4

I have ordered many copies of my own books through Create Space, some of which have my own ISBN and others have a CS ISBN. If you mean ordering books from Amazon per se rather than Create Space, I don't think I've ever done that, but why would you want to? If you order through Create Space, you get author pricing, which is much lower than the list price, ...


4

The fiction you buy yourself is probably the most reliable way to discover who's publishing fiction. All that fine print on the first couple pages of most books? It's actually pretty useful information! And by going on to actually read the story, you'll get a good idea of at least one type of story they've bought in the past. For digital versions, you may ...


4

You'll need to check with the tax laws of the jurisdiction you're living in to be sure, but in general, you don't need to have any extra legal designations in order to publish, but you DO need to declare the income for tax purposes. Amazon sends out 1099-MISC forms to their author/publishers detailing the money earned in each tax year.One copy of that form ...


3

First: I am not a lawyer. Purchase a copy of the indispensable The Copyright Handbook. It is very readable and very informative. On my copyright information pages, I include four kinds of information: Publication info Copyright notices Warning statement Fiction disclaimer Publication Info I list these items, which identify the publication and ...


3

Usually, yes, though it depends on the publisher and the exact details of your contract. It will state exactly what you are giving them, usually something like "Exclusive Rights" where they are the only publisher for a certain time or "Electronic Rights" where they have the right to publish it in any electronic form. These deals usually have time limits and ...


3

Presumably each book contains a certain set of important facts, ideas, exercises, etc. Let's call the first editions books 1.0, 2.0, etc, and the second editions books 1.1, 2.1, etc. If you want a reader to be able to go from book 4.0 to 5.1, then 5.1 needs to contain a chapter that summarizes the changes from 1.0-4.0 -> 1.1-4.1. In many fields this sort of ...


3

Professional typesetters usually use Adobe InDesign. I write novels in a program called Scrivener. I normally export from Scrivener directly into MOBI and EPUB (for ebooks), which is supported by Scrivener. For my print books, I would normally export from Scrivener into Microsoft Word, and then give the Word file to my designer, who would use InDesign. ...


3

You own the copyright on your book. It's a good idea to include a copyright notice when you publish. In the copyright notice, you can claim the copyright in your own name. You do not need to invent a company or alias. You do not need to register the copyright (though that may be a good idea). Publishing is more complex than you might imagine if you want to ...


2

Amazon has a near-global reach. To reach many countries, this is enough. Readers in some countries may find that your books are not available to them unless they open an Amazon US or Canadian account--this is especially true in the Middle East. As an indie publisher, there will be no warning that this is the case. Amazon has no presence in Russia, though, so ...


2

Making this into an answer to better benefit others looking for a variety of answers: Duct Tape It costs peanuts (like £1.50 for a thick roll) and each book will only use a tiny bit: the height of the page plus about an inch. It is also a very quick and simple method. Simply stack up your pages, rifle the "spine" edge (the edge you want to bind) and lay it ...


2

If you have time, a Japanese side-stab hand binding is relatively easy to do by hand, and more durable than glue. http://www.designsponge.com/2013/03/bookbinding-101-japanese-four-hold-binding.html May not be suitable for 350pp unless you have a fine drill to pierce the block of pages, though.


2

You don't need a publishing house for that (and anyway your intended distribution is too low for such companies to be interested). You just want to self-publish your work. When I self-published a book (making, ultimately, about 300 copies), I went to a commercial duplication place that could do production and binding. I was producing a manual, so 8.5x11 ...


2

As the creator of the work, you are the owner of the copyright. The publisher will not seek to take ownership of that copyright. Instead, they will basically enter into an agreement with you for certain rights that will give them exclusivity in publishing and/or distributing your work if they become your publisher. If you are fortunate enough to be offered ...


2

Xlibris is not a publisher. They do not consider themselves publishers, but publishing services providers. They do not select manuscripts, but offer publishing services for any author who pays them, indepenent of the quality of their work. They do not make money through sales (as a publisher would, who selects marketable manuscripts and rejects those they ...


2

Typically when you self-publish, you retain all rights to your manuscript. The printer is just performing a service for you, there is no contract, so you should be able to take everything with you, no questions asked. The only exception would be if --as you seem to indicate --you used an Xlibris template for your cover art, in which case, that would stay ...


2

Almost never. Royalties apply to copyright, and copyright only applies to the literal text of the material. Anything you learn, you can use, so long as you don't use word-for-word quotations without attribution. Let's say you are writing a book about Lincoln and you read Team Of Rivals (the source material for the recent Daniel Day Lewis movie Lincoln). ...


2

There are two parts involved in writing - the creative bit, when you're doing it, and then the editing afterwards. If the editing part of your brain is around when you're being creative, then you'll never finish anything, because your internal editor will keep telling you that it's not good enough. And if you've ever taught, you'll know that the best way ...


2

If you're self-publishing and not doing it through a company, use your real name: "Copyright (C) 2015 John Doe". Under the Berne Convention (which applies in most countries), you own the copyright from the moment of creation until you assign it away. You have no need to assign it away, so you don't need a company there. You could set up a ...


2

Definitely check out www.createspace.com That is Amazon's selfpublishing hardcopy arm. They have the sizes you are looking for and you can get your printed items done very inexpensively. You can calculate your cost before you ever try the service if you go to: ...


2

So, is a re-written or strongly edited work an original one? Almost certainly not. The reason publishers care about first rights is that very few people are going to buy a book they've already read. By putting something on the Internet, you're effectively exercising your worldwide first rights -- anyone anywhere can read it, after all. There can be ...


2

Poetry is a difficult to find an audience for regardless of what type of poetry it is. There's a lot of stigma regarding it. I would put out poetry that you're proud of, and ignore the comments that tell you not to use a certain style: write what you're comfortable and proud of. Every poet has their own voice and style, and that's what should stand out, now ...


2

Even the most famous and celebrated poets tend to have limited audiences --and you'll never please everyone. Given that, the most important thing is that you produce a book that you are proud of and happy with.


2

If you've already got a printer for the book, and a distribution plan, what else are you looking for? Do you know how to format an e-book? It's a bit finicky, but not that difficult - I really like Guido Henkels' guide (http://guidohenkel.com/2010/12/take-pride-in-your-ebook-formatting/) but it gives you way more information than you need, really. You can ...


2

It's very difficult to have hard answers for questions like this because there are way too many variables. "Traditional" publishing is not a monolith - there's a lot of difference between publishing with the Big 5 and publishing with a small e-publisher, and a lot of difference between publishing with a reputable, established e-publisher and a fly-by-night ...



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