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11

There is no way to track who buys your books on Amazon. In your books, give readers a way to connect with you. Links to your book/author/publisher web site. Link to a mailing list. Links to your social media accounts. An offer that they can sign up for (a free ebook version of the print book they bought, or a discount on another book, or a free short story ...


6

Short answer: You can't. But you shouldn't worry about it. Good textbooks get updated. They are refreshed and corrected, new material is added, things are changed to reflect reader/student/teacher feedback, and items which are no longer valid are removed. This is a good thing. I'm not saying you have to put out a new edition every year, but updating a ...


5

Dale Emery did an excellent job explaining all the different costs associated with using CreateSpace, but the bottom line is that you as the author do not have to incur any cost up front. I wanted to point out a couple of other factors that you need to take into consideration, however. First of all, don't assume that you can just convert a Word document to ...


5

When I self-published a book some years ago I had the copy shop apply comb bindings for me. At the time this cost about $1/book, but it appears that Stapes and Office Depot now charge closer to $3 for this. If your print run is small, or if you are truly willing to trade time for expense, you can buy a binding machine and the plastic combs and do it ...


5

For layout: Scribe is a free open source page layout program. For typesetting: you can use LaTex to typeset your book. For writing: I would recommend Scrivener. If you need a free program, use LibreOffice or Openoffice. Do you have $5? Lots of artists and cover designers advertise on fiverr.com. Many offer high quality work. If you want to get your text ...


4

You could look into Thermal Binding. The price should be quite similar, the result looks far more professional than comb binding, although the durability is worse - if that's a book you read just one time or a few times, that's quite sufficient, but if you use it frequently, like a handbook, it will come apart. Nevertheless, the thermal binder machine is ...


4

I have sent eight books through CreateSpace this year, including one that I'm proofing right now. The only upfront cost is the printed proof copy, and you can forego that (though it is highly recommended). Proof Copy. CreateSpace requires that you proof your book. You may choose to do this entirely through their online proofing tool, in which case there ...


3

My wife and I own two small publishing companies in the UK, and have been in the business for about 18 years. The brief answer to your question is that doing your self-pub thing doesn't hurt at all. As mentioned above, self-pub success lets the publisher know the book may be worthwhile. In fact, many of the bigger publishers keep an eye on the ebook markets ...


3

Usually, yes, though it depends on the publisher and the exact details of your contract. It will state exactly what you are giving them, usually something like "Exclusive Rights" where they are the only publisher for a certain time or "Electronic Rights" where they have the right to publish it in any electronic form. These deals usually have time limits and ...


3

Presumably each book contains a certain set of important facts, ideas, exercises, etc. Let's call the first editions books 1.0, 2.0, etc, and the second editions books 1.1, 2.1, etc. If you want a reader to be able to go from book 4.0 to 5.1, then 5.1 needs to contain a chapter that summarizes the changes from 1.0-4.0 -> 1.1-4.1. In many fields this sort of ...


3

Professional typesetters usually use Adobe InDesign. I write novels in a program called Scrivener. I normally export from Scrivener directly into MOBI and EPUB (for ebooks), which is supported by Scrivener. For my print books, I would normally export from Scrivener into Microsoft Word, and then give the Word file to my designer, who would use InDesign. ...


2

If you have time, a Japanese side-stab hand binding is relatively easy to do by hand, and more durable than glue. http://www.designsponge.com/2013/03/bookbinding-101-japanese-four-hold-binding.html May not be suitable for 350pp unless you have a fine drill to pierce the block of pages, though.


2

Amazon has a near-global reach. To reach many countries, this is enough. Readers in some countries may find that your books are not available to them unless they open an Amazon US or Canadian account--this is especially true in the Middle East. As an indie publisher, there will be no warning that this is the case. Amazon has no presence in Russia, though, so ...


2

Making this into an answer to better benefit others looking for a variety of answers: Duct Tape It costs peanuts (like £1.50 for a thick roll) and each book will only use a tiny bit: the height of the page plus about an inch. It is also a very quick and simple method. Simply stack up your pages, rifle the "spine" edge (the edge you want to bind) and lay it ...


2

Since you intend to self-publish, you will need to spend a lot of time doing the non-creative tasks, such as marketing. A cover image is part of marketing. It is, in fact, one of the most important elements. It's the first thing that the customers see and they'll judge whether they want your book or not by it. If that cover doesn't attract and/or meet their ...


2

Almost never. Royalties apply to copyright, and copyright only applies to the literal text of the material. Anything you learn, you can use, so long as you don't use word-for-word quotations without attribution. Let's say you are writing a book about Lincoln and you read Team Of Rivals (the source material for the recent Daniel Day Lewis movie Lincoln). ...


2

There are two parts involved in writing - the creative bit, when you're doing it, and then the editing afterwards. If the editing part of your brain is around when you're being creative, then you'll never finish anything, because your internal editor will keep telling you that it's not good enough. And if you've ever taught, you'll know that the best way ...


2

You don't need a publishing house for that (and anyway your intended distribution is too low for such companies to be interested). You just want to self-publish your work. When I self-published a book (making, ultimately, about 300 copies), I went to a commercial duplication place that could do production and binding. I was producing a manual, so 8.5x11 ...


2

As the creator of the work, you are the owner of the copyright. The publisher will not seek to take ownership of that copyright. Instead, they will basically enter into an agreement with you for certain rights that will give them exclusivity in publishing and/or distributing your work if they become your publisher. If you are fortunate enough to be offered ...


2

Simple answer: No. You may ask why not. The reason is because if you and a publisher sign an agreement to publish a book together you will have to sign a contract with them. Many publishers issue a boilerplate which includes a clause demanding first serial publishing rights to your work but this is as easy to exclude or waive as putting a line through it or ...


2

If a traditional publisher agrees to take your book, neither you nor they know if your book will be a success. So they will give you some pile of money as an advance (so that if the book does not sell, at least you get some compensation for your effort), arrange to take the lion’s share of the profit (so that if the book does sell well, the publisher’s ...


2

With your first book, you have no idea (honestly...) how it will sell. So, your 500 copies may well take a long time to sell, and in the meantime, you have to keep them in a damp proof storage location, preferably not on metal shelving (winter cold creates damp that way), and other factors apply, too. Nowadays, it's much easier and cheaper to use POD (Print ...


2

Typically when you self-publish, you retain all rights to your manuscript. The printer is just performing a service for you, there is no contract, so you should be able to take everything with you, no questions asked. The only exception would be if --as you seem to indicate --you used an Xlibris template for your cover art, in which case, that would stay ...


2

Xlibris is not a publisher. They do not consider themselves publishers, but publishing services providers. They do not select manuscripts, but offer publishing services for any author who pays them, indepenent of the quality of their work. They do not make money through sales (as a publisher would, who selects marketable manuscripts and rejects those they ...


1

It depends where the photo was taken. What the photo is being used for. And whether any minors are in the photo. If the person or subject of the photo is who you are writing about, you will probably need a release. There are a few exceptions, such as a public figure, and/or editorials. I took a photo in a crowded public park to capture a certain person of ...


1

Multiple indie authors have signed with with publishers after being indie. It is actually easier to get a publisher when you are a successful indie. Look up Jessica Sorenson and John G. Hartness. Jessica Sorenson is now with Hachette Book Group John G. Hartness is now with Bell Bridge Books I could give you more examples but those are the ones I am ...


1

I scoured DeviantArt for artists with styles that I liked and approached artists through that about commissions. That said, cover art is quite a different beast, often a mix of photography and graphic design so your mileage may vary. Fiverr is a super cheap place to go for outsourcing design. As an aside, I found Bettina on DeviantArt who did an awesome ...


1

Consider one of the "crowdsourced design" sites. The idea is that you hold a design contest, and pay for the winner. The process takes a week or so. I have not used crowdsourced designs myself, so I cannot recommend one. (I use stock images from Dreamstime for my covers). The Self-Publishing Podcast guys seem to like 99 Designs.


1

Poetry is a difficult to find an audience for regardless of what type of poetry it is. There's a lot of stigma regarding it. I would put out poetry that you're proud of, and ignore the comments that tell you not to use a certain style: write what you're comfortable and proud of. Every poet has their own voice and style, and that's what should stand out, now ...


1

This site, written from the poet-author's POV is pretty good: http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/getting-a-poetry-collection-published-from-submission-to-the-next-project (Note that this page is just the link page to the content.) This site is targeted more at people using their service, but it has some good practical advice: ...



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