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12

IANAL, and you should ask a lawyer (and in the future, please, never ever again sign a contract you do not understand), but for me it reads like this: You will retain all rights to the content of the Work. We do not own rights to your Work ... You haven't sold any rights. You still hold every right of your work. Which includes publishing it elsewhere. ...


9

There are a few potential disadvantages that I can see: It isn't necessarily a solution to the biggest issue for new/unknown authors: getting eyes on the page (or screen, in this case). Putting something on the internet alone isn't enough to get people to read, you still need to have produced something of quality (or something so bad it's funny!), have ...


5

(picture can be found here: dLSoft) 978-3-16-148410-0 is the ISBN (number). The vertical strokes below that number are the barcode (which represents the number above).


4

With CreateSpace, you can buy print copies of the book and send them to anyone you want. If you can make an epub file, you can send that to anyone you like, and they can read it with their favorite reader app. I use Jutoh to make epub files. There are other apps, but I don't know enough about them to offer a recommendation. Jutoh is awkward, but produces ...


3

Doing a quick survey on a few books, I have seen that there is no consensus. I have books (non-fiction, technical books) that have Acknowledgements before and after the Contents page. However, I did see a larger number inclined towards including the Acknowledgment page after the Contents page even though there are books which have it before the Contents. I ...


3

If you are providing character diversity in part to make it easier for a diverse readership to identify with at least one character, then you probably do not want one character as the narrator of the entire book. A reader naturally feels a greater emotional connection to such a narrator. Furthermore, such makes it more difficult to express the less ...


3

When I was publishing my first book, I found that the best pricing I could find to self-publish a hard-cover book was from Lulu. I wasn't doing a picture book, but if they were good on other types of books, they're probably good on other types of books, too. So here's their pricing page for picture books: http://picture.com/pricing You might also look at ...


3

Money talks. When I see that a novel has the imprint of a professional publishing house, I know that some editor actually convinced his or her boss that this book was worth paying the author money up front, in the expectation that other people would buy the book once it was published. That’s certainly no guarantee of quality, but it does narrow down the ...


3

With those terms, you can publish it with another publisher SIMULTANEOUSLY. You just can't take Partridge's formatted version, after they've done the work of formatting your text, and let someone else publish the exact same thing. The .txt or .doc (or whatever) file that YOU made, that you originally brought to Partridge, is YOURS, and you can take THAT to ...


3

Read your comments: Lauren is right, CLockeWork is wrong. (Ok, ok, I'm oversimplifying) There is a trend in publishing that suggests, that one of the best methods nowadays to get traditionally published, is by showing that your book has a (paying) audience. If you self-publish your book and it sells, you have a very compelling reason for publishers to take ...


2

With your first book, you have no idea (honestly...) how it will sell. So, your 500 copies may well take a long time to sell, and in the meantime, you have to keep them in a damp proof storage location, preferably not on metal shelving (winter cold creates damp that way), and other factors apply, too. Nowadays, it's much easier and cheaper to use POD (Print ...


2

ISBN or International Standard Book Number is a unique number assigned to a book. It is issued by a central ISBN agency in your country. In USA, you can obtain your ISBN numbers from the Bowker Agency. So the basic difference between 2 is just of the form. As ISBN is just a Number and ISBN Barcode is a Barcode. ISBN Barcode is a unique commercial book ...


2

I think one of the greatest disadvantages is, that the web is not considered to be a media for professional publishing. There are some great books published on the web (for example Butterbrick’s Practical Typography) but most content cannot compete with printed books. So no matter how much you know about your topic, if your website doesn’t look ...


2

Create an ebook and distribute it through Amazon's Kindle Direct Publishing (or other ebook selling platforms) for $0. Note: Amazon KDP allows to give away your book for free for some limited time, after that you have to sell it for at least $0.99. But you can publish it for free elsewhere, and since Amazon always wants to have the cheapes prices, once ...


2

Most of the books I've read and checked have Acknowledgements before the Table of Contents. Though this will really also depends on your preference and/or your publisher's/editor's preference. Some non-technical or fiction books even have their acknowledgements at the end of the book.


2

I'd recommend going to PODW and walking through their instant quote wizard. It will give you an excellent appreciation of the sorts of decisions that you have to make, and an idea of the costs. If you went for some traditional book printer you'd probably get a better price, but the effort of dealing with them would make you wish for an early and painless ...


2

My wife and I own two small publishing companies in the UK, and have been in the business for about 18 years. The brief answer to your question is that doing your self-pub thing doesn't hurt at all. As mentioned above, self-pub success lets the publisher know the book may be worthwhile. In fact, many of the bigger publishers keep an eye on the ebook markets ...


2

Since you intend to self-publish, you will need to spend a lot of time doing the non-creative tasks, such as marketing. A cover image is part of marketing. It is, in fact, one of the most important elements. It's the first thing that the customers see and they'll judge whether they want your book or not by it. If that cover doesn't attract and/or meet their ...


1

I scoured DeviantArt for artists with styles that I liked and approached artists through that about commissions. That said, cover art is quite a different beast, often a mix of photography and graphic design so your mileage may vary. Fiverr is a super cheap place to go for outsourcing design. As an aside, I found Bettina on DeviantArt who did an awesome ...


1

It depends where the photo was taken. What the photo is being used for. And whether any minors are in the photo. If the person or subject of the photo is who you are writing about, you will probably need a release. There are a few exceptions, such as a public figure, and/or editorials. I took a photo in a crowded public park to capture a certain person of ...


1

Traditional publishers may "only" have three advantages over self-publishing, but they are huge advantages. Houses tend to have money, experience, power, connections, and presence that self-publishers haven't had the time or resources to develop. That said, the answer to your question is a definite yes, and it's very possible to market a self-published book ...


1

Simple answer: No. You may ask why not. The reason is because if you and a publisher sign an agreement to publish a book together you will have to sign a contract with them. Many publishers issue a boilerplate which includes a clause demanding first serial publishing rights to your work but this is as easy to exclude or waive as putting a line through it or ...


1

The 1st part basically says that Partridge are not responsible for your book, they're literally just providing a publication service. It's completely yours, and you can do with it what you like in-terms of the actual content/words/ideas of the book. The 2nd part is a standard exclusivity clause. You can only publish this work with them and nobody else. ...


1

1) Do book signings outside your home town. How well-known are you?! 2) Unless your pseudonym is the opposite sex from you, just sign with your pseudonym. I'm sure Mark Twain didn't sign books as "Samuel Clemens." 3) You REALLY need to put in the work to figure out how to make digital editions. You will find that it's worth the effort.


1

The trick is probably to get yourself an agent first of all, as any decent operation will have contacts in other markets. However there are large international agencies for which this would be a more natural fit: http://www.andrewnurnberg.com/ spring to mind.


1

Dean Smith, whom Shantnu Tiwari mentions in his/her answer, is an established writer with many books on the market published by established publishers. As a new writer, being published by a publishing house means that there was some selection process that filtered out the worst writers. As a reader, blindly grabbing a book from any of the big publishing ...


1

Why not both? Dean W Smith often recommends this. Self publish the book, and then send a copy to traditional publishers. Many legacy publishers now buy top selling Indie authors. Selling to legacy publishers will be hard, unless you are already famous, or a best seller. If you publish it yourself, you can start making money immediately, and later on, may ...


1

In this link from Jun 2013, they say that in the UK, the total of ebooks sold are 12%. However, Sci-Fi has about 20% of ebook sales. It provides some links in English, but I couldn't find more info for free. Only some research to buy (and I'm not going to pay for it).


1

A strategy that I have had a lot of success with is to release a series of short stories and price them each at 99 cents, then also offer the collection of all the short stories at a lower price than the cost of all of them bought separately. I have had a considerable amount of success doing this with one of my pen names, and I am getting ready to use the ...



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