Hot answers tagged

4

A general piece of advice, from experience: Don't self-publish unless you are willing and able to do all the publicity and sales for your book yourself. If you are a wonderful self-promoter, you can do well self-publishing. Otherwise it's a recipe for disappointment. There are several routes to self-publishing, each with advantages and disadvantages: ...


4

You'll need to check with the tax laws of the jurisdiction you're living in to be sure, but in general, you don't need to have any extra legal designations in order to publish, but you DO need to declare the income for tax purposes. Amazon sends out 1099-MISC forms to their author/publishers detailing the money earned in each tax year.One copy of that form ...


4

The fiction you buy yourself is probably the most reliable way to discover who's publishing fiction. All that fine print on the first couple pages of most books? It's actually pretty useful information! And by going on to actually read the story, you'll get a good idea of at least one type of story they've bought in the past. For digital versions, you may ...


4

I have ordered many copies of my own books through Create Space, some of which have my own ISBN and others have a CS ISBN. If you mean ordering books from Amazon per se rather than Create Space, I don't think I've ever done that, but why would you want to? If you order through Create Space, you get author pricing, which is much lower than the list price, ...


3

First: I am not a lawyer. Purchase a copy of the indispensable The Copyright Handbook. It is very readable and very informative. On my copyright information pages, I include four kinds of information: Publication info Copyright notices Warning statement Fiction disclaimer Publication Info I list these items, which identify the publication and ...


3

You own the copyright on your book. It's a good idea to include a copyright notice when you publish. In the copyright notice, you can claim the copyright in your own name. You do not need to invent a company or alias. You do not need to register the copyright (though that may be a good idea). Publishing is more complex than you might imagine if you want to ...


3

In Anne Lamott's Bird by Bird, she talks about "shitty first drafts." (Read about it here.) The point is that your first draft should be nothing more than a dump of creative ideas, disregarding spelling, grammar, consistency, and all other quality measures. Then clean it up to make sense when you revise. [Someone who wasn't Hemingway] said, "Write drunk, ...


3

Another approach for you might be to write in sprints - say, 10-15 minutes - and do not permit yourself to edit. Get up for a short break, do something other than writing, then return to the writing for a new session. When you do, go back over the words you wrote in the previous session, and do any editing you'd like to do. Then move forward for another ...


3

It's common to have a different persona in your writing than in person. One of the advantages of writing is that you can appear wittier, quicker-witted, more eloquent and knowledgeable than in life, all through the magic of editing. I always advise people online to present their public persona, not their private one, and to make it a kinder, calmer, more ...


2

You are correct in your assumption that you do not need to have any type of company designation regarding a publisher, whether it be as a sole proprietorship or "doing business as". You simply operate as an individual publishing his own works, end of story. Some writers do choose to pursue some form of incorporation, but most don't need to bother with it. ...


2

Xlibris is not a publisher. They do not consider themselves publishers, but publishing services providers. They do not select manuscripts, but offer publishing services for any author who pays them, indepenent of the quality of their work. They do not make money through sales (as a publisher would, who selects marketable manuscripts and rejects those they ...


2

Typically when you self-publish, you retain all rights to your manuscript. The printer is just performing a service for you, there is no contract, so you should be able to take everything with you, no questions asked. The only exception would be if --as you seem to indicate --you used an Xlibris template for your cover art, in which case, that would stay ...


2

Here are some resources for finding publishers, magazines, and other fiction markets: Writer's Market book or web site Duotrope.com Ralan.com (see the "markets" links near the top of the page)


2

Check out Author Earnings. There are lots of debates about the collection, meaning, and significance of the data, but there's plenty of data.


2

It's very difficult to have hard answers for questions like this because there are way too many variables. "Traditional" publishing is not a monolith - there's a lot of difference between publishing with the Big 5 and publishing with a small e-publisher, and a lot of difference between publishing with a reputable, established e-publisher and a fly-by-night ...


2

If you've already got a printer for the book, and a distribution plan, what else are you looking for? Do you know how to format an e-book? It's a bit finicky, but not that difficult - I really like Guido Henkels' guide (http://guidohenkel.com/2010/12/take-pride-in-your-ebook-formatting/) but it gives you way more information than you need, really. You can ...


2

If you're self-publishing and not doing it through a company, use your real name: "Copyright (C) 2015 John Doe". Under the Berne Convention (which applies in most countries), you own the copyright from the moment of creation until you assign it away. You have no need to assign it away, so you don't need a company there. You could set up a ...


2

Definitely check out www.createspace.com That is Amazon's selfpublishing hardcopy arm. They have the sizes you are looking for and you can get your printed items done very inexpensively. You can calculate your cost before you ever try the service if you go to: ...


2

So, is a re-written or strongly edited work an original one? Almost certainly not. The reason publishers care about first rights is that very few people are going to buy a book they've already read. By putting something on the Internet, you're effectively exercising your worldwide first rights -- anyone anywhere can read it, after all. There can be ...


2

If you choose to use CreateSpace, you have a couple of different options available to you. The first is to do as you asked and buy the copies yourself and then sell them through your own site or in person for events such as book signings. According to their guidelines, you can buy copies through your own account at cost plus shipping and handling. The ...


2

As others have noted, no, you do not have to create a business of any sort in order to write and publish. Copyrights are usually registered in the name of an individual, not a company. Look at the copyright notice in the books on your shelf. Almost all will be a person's name, not a business. As a self-published author, the easiest way to get your books ...


2

Lulu gets the most recommendations, I've noticed. I think you can buy individual printed copies or bulk orders.


2

As @yblehS says, Lulu is probably your best bet. I have a book published with Lulu in hard cover and they do a nice, professional job. They have no minimum size on an order so if you just want a handful of copies -- or 1 copy -- that's no problem. You could buy the equipment to professionally bind a book at home for like a couple of thousand dollars. ...


2

Amazon has an algorithm which pulls the first number of pages for display (a percentage of the total). Here are the real details which show you how to request it to be set up and how to request that Look Inside is turned off for your book: https://authorcentral.amazon.com/gp/help?ie=UTF8&topicID=200407430 This all works for printed books (via ...


1

I found a great deal of pleasure hand-making my own books back in the 90s, when print-on-demand meant a rubber stamp and the internet was powered by rubbing two sticks together. It’s a labor of love, so I get where you’re coming from. When done right, the end result is often a far more sensual object (did I just say that?) than a book from Createspace or ...


1

I self-published for my senior project and it wasn't too difficult. If you straight up search 'self publishing' in Google, it will give you a gazillion results. I personally used CreateSpace, the amazon self publishing route. It was fairly straightforward with several steps that helped me get to my end goal. There were also a ton of forums with common ...


1

The answer is, it depends. You say that "some books have the prologue labelled as "introduction" and have an external chunk of the plot given to help clarify things that will appear in the actual plot later on", and you also note that you are referring to "the part in some books that either have a footnote about the author's life or provide some glimpse of ...


1

In general, I would try to avoid prologues or introductions. As was pointed out very nicely by user15261, the reader's interest in the information you give him has not been stirred yet. For another discussion of prologues, see this post about the length of a prologue. Personal theory: Concerning "information dumps", my personal experience is that the story ...


1

Introductions are extremely important and "Info Dumps" as you put it are some of the worst things in writing. They can be alright if the situation calls for or allows it, but you should try to avoid starting a work off with a giant one, if any. I have a friend who started a story with a two-page italicized introduction of every single character and their ...


1

The Kindle Direct Publishing contract says that you will not make your book available elsewhere for a lower price. So if your book is available on a web site for free, you can't sell it for more than $0.00 on Amazon. If they find your book available at a lower price, they will drop the Kindle price to match it. And they will scold you. I don't know whether ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible