Hot answers tagged

7

The range is enormous, but the average income for published authors is spectacularly low—around $500 a year. No missing zero. Five hundred. The tiny minority who hit the bestseller lists will do quite well. Many novels sell movie rights. Most are never made into movies, but if you are lucky enough to see your book turned into a major movie, of course you ...


7

Since it appears that you are interested in self-publishing in print format, the answer to your question will depend on where you go to have it printed. There are companies such as CreateSpace and Nook Press which will allow you to create your print book and buy copies yourself or just make them available for Print on Demand (POD). These are the two easiest ...


6

Depending on where you live, you own the copyright to a written work the instant you write it. (See Berne Convention.) You don't have to apply for copyright. You already own the copyright. There may be legal benefits to registering your copyright with your government. In the US, for example, when you sue someone for copyright infringement, you may gain ...


5

Τhis is a highly opinion seeking question and isn't suitable for an SE site. I'll try to respond with supporting facts. I am talking only about publishing e-books. Facts: Kindle is by far the easiest "commercial" platform to publish your book, with the least barriers to get your work out there. Kindle has reading devices and also apps for smartphones. This ...


5

The form for filing copyright has fields for both "Author" (the person whose name is on the work) and "Copyright Claimant" (the person who is claiming the copyright). Under Author, there is an option to check "Pseudonymous" to indicate that the Author is a pen name. If the Copyright Claimant and the Author are different names, there is space on the form to ...


4

A general piece of advice, from experience: Don't self-publish unless you are willing and able to do all the publicity and sales for your book yourself. If you are a wonderful self-promoter, you can do well self-publishing. Otherwise it's a recipe for disappointment. There are several routes to self-publishing, each with advantages and disadvantages: ...


4

I have ordered many copies of my own books through Create Space, some of which have my own ISBN and others have a CS ISBN. If you mean ordering books from Amazon per se rather than Create Space, I don't think I've ever done that, but why would you want to? If you order through Create Space, you get author pricing, which is much lower than the list price, ...


4

You'll need to check with the tax laws of the jurisdiction you're living in to be sure, but in general, you don't need to have any extra legal designations in order to publish, but you DO need to declare the income for tax purposes. Amazon sends out 1099-MISC forms to their author/publishers detailing the money earned in each tax year.One copy of that form ...


4

The fiction you buy yourself is probably the most reliable way to discover who's publishing fiction. All that fine print on the first couple pages of most books? It's actually pretty useful information! And by going on to actually read the story, you'll get a good idea of at least one type of story they've bought in the past. For digital versions, you may ...


4

Almost certainly no. But the positive thing is: the answer was always “almost certainly no.” Most fiction writers in any era did not make any money. Even the greats often worked day jobs and still died young and penniless. And even when a short story or novel sold millions, the writer often got very little. Certainly not enough to get above minimum wage ...


3

The Kindle Direct Publishing contract says that you will not make your book available elsewhere for a lower price. So if your book is available on a web site for free, you can't sell it for more than $0.00 on Amazon. If they find your book available at a lower price, they will drop the Kindle price to match it. And they will scold you. I don't know whether ...


3

You own the copyright on your book. It's a good idea to include a copyright notice when you publish. In the copyright notice, you can claim the copyright in your own name. You do not need to invent a company or alias. You do not need to register the copyright (though that may be a good idea). Publishing is more complex than you might imagine if you want to ...


3

First: I am not a lawyer. Purchase a copy of the indispensable The Copyright Handbook. It is very readable and very informative. On my copyright information pages, I include four kinds of information: Publication info Copyright notices Warning statement Fiction disclaimer Publication Info I list these items, which identify the publication and publisher:...


3

In Anne Lamott's Bird by Bird, she talks about "shitty first drafts." (Read about it here.) The point is that your first draft should be nothing more than a dump of creative ideas, disregarding spelling, grammar, consistency, and all other quality measures. Then clean it up to make sense when you revise. [Someone who wasn't Hemingway] said, "Write drunk, ...


3

Another approach for you might be to write in sprints - say, 10-15 minutes - and do not permit yourself to edit. Get up for a short break, do something other than writing, then return to the writing for a new session. When you do, go back over the words you wrote in the previous session, and do any editing you'd like to do. Then move forward for another 10-...


3

It's common to have a different persona in your writing than in person. One of the advantages of writing is that you can appear wittier, quicker-witted, more eloquent and knowledgeable than in life, all through the magic of editing. I always advise people online to present their public persona, not their private one, and to make it a kinder, calmer, more ...


3

If it's a book for younger children, the pictures are an important part of the package. You'll have a better chance submitting pictures and story than story alone. For an adult book, having a cover is not a big selling point, and I wouldn't suggest including the cover in your submission to a publisher unless it's something so perfect for your book it will ...


3

There are two ways to sell your ebooks through amazon. And your rights as the publisher depend on the one you choose. And Amazon "hosts" your content it doesn't buy away your publishing rights. Just using amazon as a publisher and not signing up for "kdp select". If you choose to go this way, you can sell your book elsewhere too. Even with other venues ...


3

I am assuming yours is an inkjet printer. (If it isn't specify the exact model.) Unless you are only going to print one or two copies (in which case buy photo paper for the colour pages and heavy, ordinary paper for the others) you are much better to print on a colour laser printer and use reasonable quality paper (e.g. 80 gram or above). The print will be ...


3

They make their profit either by buying at a discount the same as other retailers, or by selling at a premium to buyers who don't notice that the book is available at a lower price. How they buy books: At the retail price from CreateSpace's or Amazon's store, same as any other retail customer. At the wholesale price (60% discount from retail price) ...


3

Consider creating a print-ready PDF for uploading to Lulu. I'm not an expert on Lulu nor publishing nor PDFs, but I have published a full-width photo book with Lulu a few years ago. I don't recall having any margins to deal with. Some pages were only text, some pages had text and photos, and other pages were full-width photos. In Lulu, I used a 6x9 ...


3

I think it can certainly be done and it's a cool idea. However, as an avid role-player myself I want you to be aware of some (pretty major) pitfalls. This post turned out to be rather long, so let's start with the summary: Role-playing campaigns are hard to translate into entertaining stories. If you already have a really good story in your campaign, go ...


2

If you're self-publishing and not doing it through a company, use your real name: "Copyright (C) 2015 John Doe". Under the Berne Convention (which applies in most countries), you own the copyright from the moment of creation until you assign it away. You have no need to assign it away, so you don't need a company there. You could set up a sole-...


2

Here are some resources for finding publishers, magazines, and other fiction markets: Writer's Market book or web site Duotrope.com Ralan.com (see the "markets" links near the top of the page)


2

Check out Author Earnings. There are lots of debates about the collection, meaning, and significance of the data, but there's plenty of data.


2

It's very difficult to have hard answers for questions like this because there are way too many variables. "Traditional" publishing is not a monolith - there's a lot of difference between publishing with the Big 5 and publishing with a small e-publisher, and a lot of difference between publishing with a reputable, established e-publisher and a fly-by-night ...


2

If you've already got a printer for the book, and a distribution plan, what else are you looking for? Do you know how to format an e-book? It's a bit finicky, but not that difficult - I really like Guido Henkels' guide (http://guidohenkel.com/2010/12/take-pride-in-your-ebook-formatting/) but it gives you way more information than you need, really. You can ...


2

You are correct in your assumption that you do not need to have any type of company designation regarding a publisher, whether it be as a sole proprietorship or "doing business as". You simply operate as an individual publishing his own works, end of story. Some writers do choose to pursue some form of incorporation, but most don't need to bother with it. ...


2

As others have noted, no, you do not have to create a business of any sort in order to write and publish. Copyrights are usually registered in the name of an individual, not a company. Look at the copyright notice in the books on your shelf. Almost all will be a person's name, not a business. As a self-published author, the easiest way to get your books ...


2

If you choose to use CreateSpace, you have a couple of different options available to you. The first is to do as you asked and buy the copies yourself and then sell them through your own site or in person for events such as book signings. According to their guidelines, you can buy copies through your own account at cost plus shipping and handling. The "...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible