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5

For layout: Scribe is a free open source page layout program. For typesetting: you can use LaTex to typeset your book. For writing: I would recommend Scrivener. If you need a free program, use LibreOffice or Openoffice. Do you have $5? Lots of artists and cover designers advertise on fiverr.com. Many offer high quality work. If you want to get your text ...


5

When I self-published a book some years ago I had the copy shop apply comb bindings for me. At the time this cost about $1/book, but it appears that Stapes and Office Depot now charge closer to $3 for this. If your print run is small, or if you are truly willing to trade time for expense, you can buy a binding machine and the plastic combs and do it ...


4

You could look into Thermal Binding. The price should be quite similar, the result looks far more professional than comb binding, although the durability is worse - if that's a book you read just one time or a few times, that's quite sufficient, but if you use it frequently, like a handbook, it will come apart. Nevertheless, the thermal binder machine is ...


3

Professional typesetters usually use Adobe InDesign. I write novels in a program called Scrivener. I normally export from Scrivener directly into MOBI and EPUB (for ebooks), which is supported by Scrivener. For my print books, I would normally export from Scrivener into Microsoft Word, and then give the Word file to my designer, who would use InDesign. ...


2

Amazon has a near-global reach. To reach many countries, this is enough. Readers in some countries may find that your books are not available to them unless they open an Amazon US or Canadian account--this is especially true in the Middle East. As an indie publisher, there will be no warning that this is the case. Amazon has no presence in Russia, though, so ...


2

If you have time, a Japanese side-stab hand binding is relatively easy to do by hand, and more durable than glue. http://www.designsponge.com/2013/03/bookbinding-101-japanese-four-hold-binding.html May not be suitable for 350pp unless you have a fine drill to pierce the block of pages, though.


2

Making this into an answer to better benefit others looking for a variety of answers: Duct Tape It costs peanuts (like £1.50 for a thick roll) and each book will only use a tiny bit: the height of the page plus about an inch. It is also a very quick and simple method. Simply stack up your pages, rifle the "spine" edge (the edge you want to bind) and lay it ...


1

Okay, the question says cheapest way. So any answer involving hiring someone to bind the book or buying a machine must not be acceptable. mildlydiverting's answer is fantastic, and it works well for books as thick as you want. I bound a fat slab of several hundred sheets of paper in the following way: Perfectly align the sheets of paper. If you want, put ...



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