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6

I'm not sure if you're asking how producers make movies based on stories/books or how you could do the same with a story idea you have. For the sake of completeness I'll answer the second one (Shan had an excellent answer for that first case). I've just finished taking a screenwriting module in my degree and that covered the process. First you'd create an ...


5

Do it in the description. Compare these two options: SAILORS IN BOAT Hahahahahahahaha. This option tells the actors exactly what they have to say, and it looks clunky. All the sailors in the boat start laughing in unison. This option, on the other hand, gives a good short description of what the actors should do. You can also modify it a bit by having ...


5

Writing a script for a movie bears little relation to writing either short story or a novel. There are so many reasons why, but to bullet point them: You are writing in a compressed time frame Your characters can never think, they can only do The beats of your story need to happen at pretty much specific pages in order to flow as a movie The way people ...


4

The short answer is, yes, although there's no rule about it, studio readers do seem to start on page one. Readers looking for scripts for their employers to film look for a lot of things: That there's a basic concept at work in the script, that the three-act structure is being followed... there's a list to be ticked off, and every studio will require their ...


4

First, let us clarify: Is it a publishable sceneplay to be read by readers, the creative choice of that format for storytelling, the final product to be "consumed" by your audience or a tool for director to create actual play or a movie, a step, ingredient to obtain the final product which will be the actual play? There is a significant difference ...


4

If you're a Mac user, buy Scrivener. It's $45, and while it still costs something, it's a lot less than Final Draft. According to its website: ...its familiar scriptwriting features make formatting a script straightforward. So you can draft your script inside Scrivener using the unique research and structural tools and then export it to ...


4

From what I know, though Im not an expert: The story or book must have been published, and seen some measure of commercial success, for the producer to have read it. If the producer likes your book, and thinks it can be turned into a movie, they will approach you and offer to buy the movie rights to your book- which means only they can make a movie from that ...


3

There is a really good free option for Mac users : CeltX Why buy or use software as opposed to MS-Word or Pages? It does the formatting for you, so you don't even have to think about it and instead, can focus on your writing.


2

First of all, read current scripts. You can surmise many formatting rules from examples. Second, buy The Screenwriter's Bible: A Complete Guide to Writing, Formatting, and Selling Your Script. This helped me out when I couldn't get my hands on scripts. Third, there's so much more to screenwriting than just format. There is style, which can only be learned ...


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I think 'Screenplay - the Foundations of Screenwriting' by Syd Field is considered to be "The Bible" in this area. Great book.


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I think Story by Robert McKee is good. It may not go into some of the technical details you may want, but is a great book on how to tell a story.


2

Why not simply describe the FX you want. Footsteps on gravel, rusty metal gate opening, reverberating gunshot, scream of pain is far more useful in a screenplay than Crunch, Creak, Kapowee, Aaaagh. Unless of course you are writing a comic book.


1

Consider screech, clang, clank, groan. • screech, “A high-pitched strident or piercing sound, such as that between a moving object and any surface.” • clang, “A loud, ringing sound, like that made by free-hanging metal objects striking each other.” • clank, “A loud, hard sound of metal hitting metal. Usage note: Clank usually expresses a duller or less ...


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I have no experience with screenwriting specifically, but I see no reason why this would be different from the considerations in the fiction market (where "sending chapters" is always the first three chapters: the reader will start from the beginning, precisely like a viewer would. Why would he do otherwise? That's what makes sense; that's what gives him the ...


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You need to be clear (with your own self) why you have a segmented screenplay. Stories that become one This is the most obvious, but also the most complex. At some point the various narratives will need foreshadowing and unforced plot alignment in order to not break your contract with your audience. Keeping track of each individual segment's storyline and ...


1

If I'm reading your question right, stories become scripts well in advance of ever getting close to becoming a production. It doesn't matter if you're adapting a novel or writing a 'spec' (an uncommissioned script based on an original idea) stories rarely go into production until the script is finished because the finished script is what attracts the studio, ...


1

Screenplays are heavily structured. Structure is almost everything within a screenplay. Tarantino and some others are the exception to the rule so I'd avoid writing like them until you get your foot in the door. However, most stories, translated into a "script" need to be structured in the three act structure where you follow a set of story beats and ...


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Pretty much what I've heard about script formatting is: Buy Final Draft. There is no step 2.


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The first book you should buy is The Screenwriter's Bible by David Trottier. This is the complete guide to formatting in hard copy. While you may rely on software to format, knowing your formatting is equally as important. Syd Fields' - The Foundation of Screenwriting is also a great place to start. This offers the basic steps in regard to screenwriting. ...


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There is great support for script writers and film makers available from the BBC, including free advice and film showcasing. They also have a published guide to writing, including sample screenplays by both professional and amateur writers, with in-depth reviews on each. Filmmaking - guides, how-tos, case studies and behind-the-scenes Showcasing - ...



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