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7

My first advice is -- don't. There's an attitude in the gaming industry that working on games is so cool they shouldn't have to pay you a fair wage. Working conditions in the game industry tend to lag behind other sectors. Salaries for graphic artists and coders in the game industry are about 1/3 of what those same people would make in any other sector, ...


6

It doesn't sound hopeful to me. Also, is there any reason why this has to be so universal and not more personal? It comes across as kind of preachy. Introspective might be both more powerful and moving. The first sentence could benefit by the rule of threes. List three things, not six. I find this statement confusing: "although according to the fundamental ...


4

I'd write it in the script. You have to hire someone to read the lines, and it's audible dialogue which the characters and audience have to hear and react to. GREG I've got the tea. Where are the biscuits? JOHN Upper cabinet to the left of the sink, bottom shelf. RADIO ANNOUNCER And now, we present for your enjoyment the dramatization of Neil Gaiman's ...


4

The short answer is, yes, although there's no rule about it, studio readers do seem to start on page one. Readers looking for scripts for their employers to film look for a lot of things: That there's a basic concept at work in the script, that the three-act structure is being followed... there's a list to be ticked off, and every studio will require their ...


4

Here are some resources you might be interested in: Writing for the Gaming Industry The Ultimate Guide to Video Game Writing and Design


4

If you're a Mac user, buy Scrivener. It's $45, and while it still costs something, it's a lot less than Final Draft. According to its website: ...its familiar scriptwriting features make formatting a script straightforward. So you can draft your script inside Scrivener using the unique research and structural tools and then export it to ...


3

Bioware had a contest several years ago to hire a writer. Certainly not an appealing way to go about applying for a job, but that contest did leave behind some potentially useful tips for what sort of writing game companies might be looking for, eg: Some additional guidelines to keep in mind: Dialogue should be no longer than 2-3 lines at a ...


3

Is "the easiest way to earn rewards online at the click of a button" a tag phrase you have to use? It seems a bit awkwardly worded to me. How about "the easiest way to earn rewards online at the click of a button" I would change "Hit up our link sharing section instead." to "Hit up Visit our link sharing section instead." Also, "you can chance your ...


2

If this is a script being read over a video, then use #1, as #2 doesn't give enough information. It makes me want to hunt around and find actual directions. Suggested fixes: I've never heard "chance" being used as a verb to mean "gamble." Try "wager" the first time and "the more points you bet" the second. "All of our videos are short, entertaining, and ...


2

In the first paragraph, make the list stick to only one repetition, either "everything" or "all". The conflict really detracts from the message; the repetition is important style device but mixing the two words or phrases negates the benefit. Your second paragraph has its sentences run too long. It would benefit from being chopped up, giving the paragraph ...


2

I like it a lot, reminds me a little bit of what "Enter the Void" would be like if it was narrated. I also like the sadder aspects of it; I can imagine it'd be a really profound and impactful way to finish your story. However, it could possibly do with some polish on a few of the syntax and lexical choices. One's obvious: in "We’d need to think higher than ...


2

First of all, read current scripts. You can surmise many formatting rules from examples. Second, buy The Screenwriter's Bible: A Complete Guide to Writing, Formatting, and Selling Your Script. This helped me out when I couldn't get my hands on scripts. Third, there's so much more to screenwriting than just format. There is style, which can only be learned ...


1

From the filmmaking side, being on set, we refer to the printed copy as a script. The script is a tool that the actor and rest of the crew use while on set at a particular location, and is often only a portion of the entire screenplay. Directors, actors, continuity directors, script supervisors, and film loaders (clapper/slate operators) often make ...


1

Number 13 on this page explains that ...if there’s a TV, and a reporter is talking, and your character is engaged with it, you need to provide all the dialogue. However, if its just background noise: Yes, there’s such a thing as walla. That’s background noise, the indistinct chatter of others in public places. You don’t have to write that in. ...


1

I have no experience with screenwriting specifically, but I see no reason why this would be different from the considerations in the fiction market (where "sending chapters" is always the first three chapters: the reader will start from the beginning, precisely like a viewer would. Why would he do otherwise? That's what makes sense; that's what gives him the ...


1

You need to be clear (with your own self) why you have a segmented screenplay. Stories that become one This is the most obvious, but also the most complex. At some point the various narratives will need foreshadowing and unforced plot alignment in order to not break your contract with your audience. Keeping track of each individual segment's storyline and ...



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