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There is probably no "best" strategy. There many ways to sell scripts but here are some things you can do to help. You have to put yourself into an agent's or producer's shoes. There are tens of thousands of new scripts floating around each year and the vast majority (let's say, conservatively, 80%) are not nearly good enough to produce. People looking for ...


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I am not sure you really want literary devices. You want moving image specific devices. These vary between genres. For example, a love story is more likely to use soft focus shots than a sit com. I would recommend finding an introduction to film/television analysis. It will tell you what the techniques are and when to use them. Then you can see how other ...


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There are many literary devices used in movies and television. Here are a few: Subtext, or the meaning behind the words, is vital to screenwriting. If someone tells you your dialogue is "on the nose" then it's time to bring on the subtext. People rarely say exactly what they feel so it comes across as jarring in movies if a character does. It can be ...


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No, you do not have to keep calling the character by his or her full name. It would make it very awkward to have to read "Ted Dibar does this", "Ted Dibar does that", all the way through the script. Go ahead and call him Ted in the action lines. Or TED when it's formatted above dialogue. And read scripts. They're all over the web (e.g., the mother-lode of ...


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Writing one or two examples of the "average" script won't hurt, and it's good practice. I wouldn't do any more, though, because it could all change if and when it goes into development. One thing you should have in order to pitch this project is a simple bible. If they like the pitch they may ask to read the pilot. If they like the pilot they may ask for a ...


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For a screenplay it is standard to use present tense, and to use simple present in most cases. It makes the action more immediate. So, instead of "are watching" you'd just say that they "watch". Or they gawk, or scan or consider or stare at -- whatever makes sense. Use very specific nouns and verbs. Every word counts. You don't have many to work with. So, ...


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I think you just need to add a few things to go ahead. You should have a flow of events for at least an entire season written. This will not only give the agent a better idea of your story but also give you a baseline to follow. An entire script for the season may not be necessary. Also an outline for another season. Just few possibilities will get more ...


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IMO: A script is verbal language only. It's WHAT is said. The screenplay is HOW the script is said. It's all the things that lend to how a script plays out on screen, from location to mood to staging and lighting.



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