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1

Assuming it's something you're writing on spec, I think you need to write your best attempt at the song lyrics. (Why write a musical if you don't write songs?) If you're offering a musical and you write "Insert song here" it seems jarring for the reader. It's a like reading "Insert great plot twist". If a writer has been hired to write a musical, it could ...


1

A musical has 3 kinds of writing in it: the “book” (aka the “play”) written by the writer the lyrics, written by the lyricist the music, written by the composer … if you don’t write all 3 yourself then you need collaborators. Generally speaking, the lyrics are written either first or concurrently with the book because they are the most important parts ...


0

The correct way to do this depends who we are watching. Assuming we are looking at Jane.. Jane is on the phone talking to Michael. JANE Fine, I'll see you on Thursday. MICHAEL (V.O.) (filtered) I'm looking forward to it. Jane hears ANOTHER WOMAN'S VOICE close to ...


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Final draft has a SHOT under the ELEMENTS menu I would format it like this... INT. LIVING ROOM - NIGHT Steven watches a news broadcast on TELEVISION (This is in caps to indicate a prop) ON TV (this is how a shot looks in final draft) MALE NEWS REPORTER Blah, blah, blah! ON STEVEN (Shot to indicate a return to the ...


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Final draft has a script compare function. TOOLS > SCRIPTCOMPARE. If you compare two drafts it will point out the differences.


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The smart thing to do is to add continuos to the slug line. INT. GARAGE - NIGHT (CONTINOUS) This indicates the action is happening at the same time as... INT. SECURITY OFFICE - NIGHT (CONTINOUS)


4

Never put camera angles/shots in your screenplay, it screams amateur. You can however cheat to create visual clues. Example: INT. PRISON - DAY A pair of shackled FEET shuffle down the hallway.


5

The current fashion in screenwriting is to avoid mentions of camera angles and focus on storytelling, but you can certainly mention POV. Some people do this with a slugline. INT. BEDROOM—DAY BILL'S POV Bill fixes his hair in the mirror. But if you're going to do the trick where a mirror image turns out to be the real one, you don't need to mention POV ...


2

From a practical production standpoint, it's best to write them as two scenes, because for the newscaster's setting and dialogue, it will need to be shot in a separate studio or building, etc. Aside about style: if you're not going to direct it, eliminate shooting directions except where it's absolutely essential to effectively conveying the story. ...


1

I'd force myself to spend 20 or so minutes on only describing one scene or only going through a single character's internal monologue. Stop yourself from going ahead and only work on describing/monologue. Good luck!


0

I'd write it all out. Then edit to death. Sure, it's inefficient, and sure, you might have to spend a few extra years on it. But at least you've gotten it out. And maybe outline. Outlining helps too. Good luck!


2

You have an ability to write screenplays that even you are forced to describe as "pretty spectacular." Given this, and your dislike of descriptive writing, I can't for the life of me understand why you want to make the transition to books. Focus on your screenwriting. A screenplay will typically make you much more money a novel. Current WGA rates start at ...


2

Obvious answer is to read more novels. At the same time, don't worry about your previous skill set; novels are as much about dialogue as they are prose. Try and have a strong grasp of figurative language while still remaining clear in your description of events. Otherwise I recommend learning to slow the pacing of the story quite a lot. You have time to be ...


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A snappy sarcastic answer is tempting... Something like, "How about Craigslist?" But on second thought... What you're looking for is for someone to solve your problems with writers block for you, rather than solving them yourself. Writers block is something that all writers have from time to time. There are a number of questions here that address it ...


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There are lots of tools that can help with screenplays, such as WriterDuet.com. You can write screenplays with an editor like Word or Notepad, but this tool is easy because it familiarizes you with the ways real screenwriters do their job. It has fade and change camera position presets that automatically type in what you selected. As for books, I use Word ...



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