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A screenplay is an odd hybrid because you have two audiences, the reader of the screenplay, and the viewer of the film. Because of this, screenplays have a lot of strict conventions which you should never break (or only for EXTREMELY good reasons). In general, anything that will appear on screen needs to be described the first time in appears, not in the ...


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It is perfectly possible to do this. A classic example would be Moby Dick. Okay, it's a whale but it's a character that gets spoken about in great length before finally appearing. Likewise, Keyser Soze gets spoken about in The Usual Suspects without ever appearing. A lot of the time in films, a character in teen films especially is usually talked about ...


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There are usually deeper reasons about why you get stuck writing a story. It could be that there just isn't enough tension (conflict) in the story to begin with. For example, can you imagine someone telling you a story that goes like this: My friend George was free climbing a cliff the other day. It's a terrible story that ended tragically. At one ...


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Just skip to the next plot point and write that. Chances are that later on you'll think of a way to bridge the two, and then you can come back and fill in the details when that happens. I would guess that very few writers proceed sequentially through an entire work. It's good to jump around when you're finding yourself stuck; there's no point in stagnating ...


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Do you have some other parts of the story worked out? I would just jump ahead for now and write the next scene that you "know". Then, before you know it, you can fill the gap.


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You'd use the character name. Most screenplays are written well before they're cast, so it would be impossible to use the actor name. And even if you knew the actor (like, it was part of a series) you'd use the character name because it's the character saying the line, not the actor. ETA: You can see this, for example, in the screenplay for Empire Strikes ...


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You may like: The Comedy Bible From Stand-up to Sitcom The Comedy Writer's Ultimate "How To" Guide by Judy Carter More specific, less popular are: The Eight Characters of Comedy: Guide to Sitcom Acting And Writing 2nd Edition by Scott Sedita Elephant Bucks: An Inside Guide to Writing for TV Sitcoms by Sheldon Bull Writing Television Sitcoms (revised) by ...


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It's been a while since I worked on a screenplay, but I believe the proper format is this: JANE (V.O.) (filtered) Fine, I'll see you on Thursday. MICHAEL (V.O.) (filtered, muffled) Who the hell are you talking to? In other words, you just describe what the difference in the sound quality would be. I've also seen it where terms like "over ...


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Using !? is ok, when your reader knows what that mean in "words and expressions". If you are making a comics, it will be understand well, because you can catch somebody's face and its expression during the situation. BUT If you want to be a good storyteller, you need to explain the situation as well as face expression to your reader. Using ? and ! ...


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The use of an Interrobang is perfectly acceptable language usage, and there is no technical reason why it can't be used. However, It would be difficult to assume that all of the readers of the screenplay would understand what the intended meaning is, so you may be better conveying that in a more explicit way. (which is a shame, because I do rather love ...


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I don't know much about screenwriting, but I do know about stage plays. In many cases, the stage directions fill in the writer's vision and set up the atmosphere. For example, from "A Streetcar Named Desire": [The sky is] "...a peculiarly tender blue, almost a turquoise, which invests the scene with a kind of lyricism and gracefully attenuates the ...


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Sounds like a director/cinematographer's choice more than yours. The screenwriter's role is to build the story, right? So unless that sky has an absolutely irreplaceable effect on the scene (unlikely) or it has strong thematic resonance that truly elevates the work (unlikely) you're getting too focused on details. Even a third-person novelist, who has ...


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I've attempted to address this problem before, and I double-checked both Google help files and Google Add-Ons in hope of finding a solution for you (and me), but I've had no luck. Google Docs does not distinguish between odd and even pages that, in a book, would become the recto and verso pages. Without recto and verso, one cannot place a gutter margin on ...


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There's not a single answer. Mostly you would do whatever the studio, the lyricist and the other people working on the musical need. You'll want to establish the points in your script where songs are needed; emotional moments, or revelatory ones, or even just where it needs to be broken up. Then indicate in the script that a song is happening, explain ...



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