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9

INT. STARBUCKS, LOS ANGELES People are sitting at tables and on couches, some on smartphones, many typing away on laptops. We pan to a man in his 40's, with a ponytail and reading glasses. He is concentrating fiercely, reading something on a Macbook. JOE (looks up at camera): Oh, hello there! I didn't see you. Welcome to Screenwriter's Corner. Today we ...


8

They do not quit their day job. That's true for many other writers, too. But besides that, yes, they get paid for unused scripts if these scripts were optioned. I. e. a producer pays them money for the exclusive right to the script for a certain amount of time. During that time the producer can think about turning it into a movie without fearing that a ...


7

If you didn't create an outline — that is, if you didn't know beforehand how it was going to end — then you're suffering from impeded arborvision (you can't see the forest for the trees). 1) Put it in a drawer and don't read it for a month. Come back with fresher eyes. You'd be amazed what you catch. 2) Hand it off to someone else and ask your ...


7

In many cases you don't actually need, or necessarily want, to describe the gesture itself. It is often enough, or even preferable, to (a) convey that there was a gesture and (b) convey its meaning, without describing the gesture. There are at least two reasons for this: The gesture is idiomatic and a specific description would just get in the way. "He ...


6

There is nothing new under the sun, my friend. If you read TV Tropes you might be forgiven for thinking that all plots are like all other plots. However it is not the plots (there are considered to be only seven or so actual plots anyway) but the characterisations, details, names etc that make your world unique to you. If you are worried that you have by ...


5

Do it in the description. Compare these two options: SAILORS IN BOAT Hahahahahahahaha. This option tells the actors exactly what they have to say, and it looks clunky. All the sailors in the boat start laughing in unison. This option, on the other hand, gives a good short description of what the actors should do. You can also modify it a bit by having ...


4

Have your target audience in mind, but don't stereotype and don't dumb it down. I mean, if that's a cartoon for kids, make it a nice tale for kids, but get the characters a secondary, non-obvious set of characteristics; have them play it through some behaviors, things that kid will simply shrug away as some insignificant discrepancy but an adult will notice ...


4

First, let us clarify: Is it a publishable sceneplay to be read by readers, the creative choice of that format for storytelling, the final product to be "consumed" by your audience or a tool for director to create actual play or a movie, a step, ingredient to obtain the final product which will be the actual play? There is a significant difference ...


3

I have only limited experience with this, but I imagine that the first step would be to film as much of the behind-the-scenes action as you can. Get the staff used to having a camera crew around. As you film, look for patterns and themes. Conduct interviews, and ask lots of questions. When you are done with this step, you should have a better idea of how ...


3

I think the basic issue you're running into here is that IRL the "come here" wave is quick but so far, anyway, all of the devices used to describe it are not. For instance... He turned his hand, clenched his fingers toward his palm, and pointed his thumb skyward. ...is a great way of describing a thumbs-up if this gesture is, for instance, foreign to ...


3

For a screenplay, it is probably more important to be clear than to have excellent, flowing prose. (I'm not a screenwriter.) For the more-general case of descriptive prose, however, one approach is to convert "they are" verbal clauses to adjectival clauses. Instead of: Hundreds of people are standing and looking at the on-coming train. Their sweating ...


2

Your first example is a not a grammatical sentence. It is a comma splice. It uses a comma to join two independent clauses. Your third example uses repetition. Repetition serves to emphasize the thing that's repeated. It also introduces a kind of rhythm into the sentence. Repetition is grammatically acceptable. Whether it's a good idea depends on whether ...


2

There are two classic good, satisfactory approaches to ending a story. Let me call them "Less is More" and "Afterglow." "Less is more" ends before the key point - possibly seconds or hours before it. The text built a rich story in the reader's head, there were many threads that converged towards one single point. Then the explicit story, the one told to the ...


1

I constantly read books and watch movies that are totally unlike anything that I have ever read or seen before. There is an unlimited wealth of stories that have never been told. If your story is like "all other" alien invasion stories, then that is because you have seen or read those other stories, learned their underlying schema, and now have applied it ...


1

From the filmmaking side, being on set, we refer to the printed copy as a script. The script is a tool that the actor and rest of the crew use while on set at a particular location, and is often only a portion of the entire screenplay. Directors, actors, continuity directors, script supervisors, and film loaders (clapper/slate operators) often make ...


1

First, Who is the audience? Patients without insurance. Okay...everything from alzheimers to pregnancy? What is the objective of the piece? Goals? What is the tone of the piece? eg: Hard, soft? What kind of services are provided at the clinic? Who is eligible? Interviews you say need to be done? With whom? What are the no more than six messages you want ...


1

Here are some thoughts to help guide you on your way (and by no means authoritative.) Is the pilot intended to be aired? How long will the episodes be? How long will the pilot be? How many acts per episode? How many acts in the pilot? Is the pilot the start of the story, a first draft of the story, or just another episode? If the pilot is a draft your only ...


1

The best way to describe a gesture is how the body physically moves to make that gesture. Here's a few examples: Telling someone to come here He swept his hand toward his body. Flashing the okay sign He put his forefinger to his thumb forming an o and raised his other three fingers. Giving thumbs up He turned his hand, clenched his fingers ...


1

Consider screech, clang, clank, groan. • screech, “A high-pitched strident or piercing sound, such as that between a moving object and any surface.” • clang, “A loud, ringing sound, like that made by free-hanging metal objects striking each other.” • clank, “A loud, hard sound of metal hitting metal. Usage note: Clank usually expresses a duller or less ...


1

I normally use repetitions when I want to emphasize something. Use repetitions in those examples, for me, would not be a good practice. Just as an example. I thought about it. I thought about it deeply, and realized it was not the way. In your example phrases, I would go for something like Dale suggested. Alex looks around. The room is almost empty... ...


1

I would have just commented, but I am too low for that at the moment. I wanted to add that one reason for this format is the viewer can now focus on the relationships that are forming in the background. The humor of how House relates to his team, the drama of his drug abuse, the ups and downs of his romantic relationships -- all this develops because you ...



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