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8

Here's the most simple answer to your solution. Plus, I believe it will make your story better over all. More interesting and add facets that you will be able to explore that will surely make your story much better. The simple answer is: Give your antagonist a weakness. Design the Perfect Weakness For Antagonist Think about Superman. A difficult ...


7

Most people work with the thought in mind that their piece of writing will go on to be well received, and more success will come based around that, so will leave doors open for sequels. However, nobody wants to read an incomplete book. Therefore you will usually find that most things will wrap up quite well at the end, and most plot points will be handled ...


5

There are a number of variations that are recommended in various on-line screenwriting guides, including side-by-side or linearly but using a directive like 'during' At Story Sense they say When writing dialogue in two columns to indicate simultaneous speeches, the left margin of the first dialogue column must be inset slightly. It must not start in the ...


5

The current fashion in screenwriting is to avoid mentions of camera angles and focus on storytelling, but you can certainly mention POV. Some people do this with a slugline. INT. BEDROOM—DAY BILL'S POV Bill fixes his hair in the mirror. But if you're going to do the trick where a mirror image turns out to be the real one, you don't need to mention POV ...


5

Focus on the viewpoint character's attention and opinions. Describe whatever the viewpoint character pays attention to, especially if the character has an opinion about it. Don't describe anything that the viewpoint character pays no attention to.


4

It's not always so different. There are just a set of rules in hollywood, there isn't really in bollywood. So in bollywood you write as you please and so sometimes it looks more like the hollywood-style, one minute per page format, and other times like a stage-play-script. Sometimes in bollywood there is no dialogue but just a treatment and then someone else ...


4

It's been a while since I worked on a screenplay, but I believe the proper format is this: JANE (V.O.) (filtered) Fine, I'll see you on Thursday. MICHAEL (V.O.) (filtered, muffled) Who the hell are you talking to? In other words, you just describe what the difference in the sound quality would be. I've also seen it where terms like "over ...


4

Because the story you are telling will be finished in two-hours, you need to be economical in your dramatic decisions. Every scene must count, and therefore every scene must build from the previous one. If each of the three crises is of equal weight, nothing is really advanced, and you create a pattern similar to the Labors of Hercules: nobody really ...


4

There are some good 'from idea to finished book' guides out there. I recommend for example the 10th season of the Writing Excuses podcast, that is built like a master class and leads you through the steps of story-, characters-, and world-creation. http://www.writingexcuses.com/category/season/season-10/ Writers Write just started an 'A novel in a year' ...


4

Never put camera angles/shots in your screenplay, it screams amateur. You can however cheat to create visual clues. Example: INT. PRISON - DAY A pair of shackled FEET shuffle down the hallway.


3

The biggest difference is that a novel is (typically) a solo production. A screenplay is inevitably a collaboration (towards the final movie). Everything in a novel needs to be on the page. Everything in a screenplay is going to be realized and reinterpreted by actors, director, etc. As part of this, if you write a novel, who have a novel, it's still a ...


3

Just skip to the next plot point and write that. Chances are that later on you'll think of a way to bridge the two, and then you can come back and fill in the details when that happens. I would guess that very few writers proceed sequentially through an entire work. It's good to jump around when you're finding yourself stuck; there's no point in stagnating ...


3

Sounds like a director/cinematographer's choice more than yours. The screenwriter's role is to build the story, right? So unless that sky has an absolutely irreplaceable effect on the scene (unlikely) or it has strong thematic resonance that truly elevates the work (unlikely) you're getting too focused on details. Even a third-person novelist, who has ...


3

You'd use the character name. Most screenplays are written well before they're cast, so it would be impossible to use the actor name. And even if you knew the actor (like, it was part of a series) you'd use the character name because it's the character saying the line, not the actor. ETA: You can see this, for example, in the screenplay for Empire Strikes ...


3

It sounds like you're something of a discovery writer (aka pantser). You wrote lots and lots of material, and now you have to carve away everything which doesn't fit your plot. If you are a discovery writer rather than a planner, then removing all the parts which don't belong there is part of the process of writing your first draft. Keep all the cool bits ...


3

I have been told that the sentence you should cut out is the one you love the most. I have found this true of my own writing: a really interesting section just has to go because it doesn't fit within the whole. Sometimes I have be able to re-cast an idea. Sometimes I have been able to use it in another story or play. Sometimes I have to just throw it away.


3

I would actually keep her character intact as a cheerleader. Then in the second, as you reveal more about her character and motivations for overthrowing the current CEO, you can show that her appearance in the original work was a carefully crafted facade, designed to get her to the top as quickly and effortlessly as possible. The exact reasoning, of ...


3

If I’m understanding you correctly, you have a female character – who is not an MC right now, but a strong secondary character. This character in current WIP is of the Ambassador personality type. Typically this type is described as: Ambassadors will be positive about any change and will be highly aligned, however they will not proactively try to ...


3

I would suggest Blake Snyder's "Save the Cat" and "Save the Cat Goes to the Movies" as some good starting material. I found them to be very useful for understanding story structures in general, particularly those most common in Hollywood. Along these lines, I would suggest not just limiting yourself to comedy-specific advice. The best comedy (IMO) takes ...


3

There is probably no "best" strategy. There many ways to sell scripts but here are some things you can do to help. You have to put yourself into an agent's or producer's shoes. There are tens of thousands of new scripts floating around each year and the vast majority (let's say, conservatively, 80%) are not nearly good enough to produce. People looking for ...


3

Have to agree with rolfedh. As a professional reader I always get uneasy when I receive an "unconventional" script. The main reason for this is that it suggests that the writer couldn't find a way to express what they mean in the script itself, and had to somehow bolster their work with additional material that will never make it to the screen. If your ...


3

Side by side dialog. The screenwriting programs have a command to move selected paragraphs from inline to side by side. Very straightforward.


3

It's a good question and I keep tripping over. I am a director writing my first original screenplay and I constantly go back and forth between including angles and not. One day I will put them in and the next day I will go back and remove them all. It's a tricky one. On one hand I want to show the way I visualise the drama unfolding photographically but ...


2

Writing one or two examples of the "average" script won't hurt, and it's good practice. I wouldn't do any more, though, because it could all change if and when it goes into development. One thing you should have in order to pitch this project is a simple bible. If they like the pitch they may ask to read the pilot. If they like the pilot they may ask for a ...


2

The use of an Interrobang is perfectly acceptable language usage, and there is no technical reason why it can't be used. However, It would be difficult to assume that all of the readers of the screenplay would understand what the intended meaning is, so you may be better conveying that in a more explicit way. (which is a shame, because I do rather love ...


2

Do you have some other parts of the story worked out? I would just jump ahead for now and write the next scene that you "know". Then, before you know it, you can fill the gap.


2

Short answer: only as much as you need. Which Usually means "not a whole lot." Screenwriting is a collaborative effort. The author needs to write enough for the locale to be "suggestive," but not so much as to take away freedom from the producer. The more "generic" the place (New York, Chicago, Paris, etc.) the less you need to write. Only if the place is ...


2

Parenthetical remarks are used to describe the attitude, tone, or action for the actor who is speaking. Stage direction describe whatever's going on on the stage in general. There's a bunch of different "standard" or "accepted" formats used to accomplish it. The name of a character who is speaking should be capitalized and centered, just like in a ...


2

The only real answer here is just doing it. no excuses no rationalizations, no ill write twice as much tomorrow, for 30 days find the most convenient time during your day that you are not going to get interrupted, then spend the first 5-15 minutes getting into the right mindset, read your last paragraph or your outline, fill your mind with your characters ...


2

but the story involves an enemy who can perfectly anticipate your moves. This happened more than once on Leverage (a totally fun Robin Hood heist-of-the-week show; I highly recommend it). The Leverage crew is made of five bad guys who have gone good and run cons to benefit people. Unfortunately, after a while, each person's reputation becomes known, and ...



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