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8

Here's the most simple answer to your solution. Plus, I believe it will make your story better over all. More interesting and add facets that you will be able to explore that will surely make your story much better. The simple answer is: Give your antagonist a weakness. Design the Perfect Weakness For Antagonist Think about Superman. A difficult ...


6

The current fashion in screenwriting is to avoid mentions of camera angles and focus on storytelling, but you can certainly mention POV. Some people do this with a slugline. INT. BEDROOM—DAY BILL'S POV Bill fixes his hair in the mirror. But if you're going to do the trick where a mirror image turns out to be the real one, you don't need to mention POV ...


5

There are a number of variations that are recommended in various on-line screenwriting guides, including side-by-side or linearly but using a directive like 'during' At Story Sense they say When writing dialogue in two columns to indicate simultaneous speeches, the left margin of the first dialogue column must be inset slightly. It must not start in the ...


5

Focus on the viewpoint character's attention and opinions. Describe whatever the viewpoint character pays attention to, especially if the character has an opinion about it. Don't describe anything that the viewpoint character pays no attention to.


4

Because the story you are telling will be finished in two-hours, you need to be economical in your dramatic decisions. Every scene must count, and therefore every scene must build from the previous one. If each of the three crises is of equal weight, nothing is really advanced, and you create a pattern similar to the Labors of Hercules: nobody really ...


4

It's been a while since I worked on a screenplay, but I believe the proper format is this: JANE (V.O.) (filtered) Fine, I'll see you on Thursday. MICHAEL (V.O.) (filtered, muffled) Who the hell are you talking to? In other words, you just describe what the difference in the sound quality would be. I've also seen it where terms like "over ...


4

There are some good 'from idea to finished book' guides out there. I recommend for example the 10th season of the Writing Excuses podcast, that is built like a master class and leads you through the steps of story-, characters-, and world-creation. http://www.writingexcuses.com/category/season/season-10/ Writers Write just started an 'A novel in a year' ...


4

Never put camera angles/shots in your screenplay, it screams amateur. You can however cheat to create visual clues. Example: INT. PRISON - DAY A pair of shackled FEET shuffle down the hallway.


4

I think everyone can become better at something. With a lot of practice, I can learn how to play the piano better that I can now, but either due to motivation or to some innate way my brain is wired, I consider it outrageously unlikely that I will become as good as some classically trained soloist. Writing is the same. Everyone can become better Not ...


3

The biggest difference is that a novel is (typically) a solo production. A screenplay is inevitably a collaboration (towards the final movie). Everything in a novel needs to be on the page. Everything in a screenplay is going to be realized and reinterpreted by actors, director, etc. As part of this, if you write a novel, who have a novel, it's still a ...


3

Just skip to the next plot point and write that. Chances are that later on you'll think of a way to bridge the two, and then you can come back and fill in the details when that happens. I would guess that very few writers proceed sequentially through an entire work. It's good to jump around when you're finding yourself stuck; there's no point in stagnating ...


3

Side by side dialog. The screenwriting programs have a command to move selected paragraphs from inline to side by side. Very straightforward.


3

Sounds like a director/cinematographer's choice more than yours. The screenwriter's role is to build the story, right? So unless that sky has an absolutely irreplaceable effect on the scene (unlikely) or it has strong thematic resonance that truly elevates the work (unlikely) you're getting too focused on details. Even a third-person novelist, who has ...


3

You'd use the character name. Most screenplays are written well before they're cast, so it would be impossible to use the actor name. And even if you knew the actor (like, it was part of a series) you'd use the character name because it's the character saying the line, not the actor. ETA: You can see this, for example, in the screenplay for Empire Strikes ...


3

It's a good question and I keep tripping over. I am a director writing my first original screenplay and I constantly go back and forth between including angles and not. One day I will put them in and the next day I will go back and remove them all. It's a tricky one. On one hand I want to show the way I visualise the drama unfolding photographically but ...


3

Have to agree with rolfedh. As a professional reader I always get uneasy when I receive an "unconventional" script. The main reason for this is that it suggests that the writer couldn't find a way to express what they mean in the script itself, and had to somehow bolster their work with additional material that will never make it to the screen. If your ...


3

It depends on what your intent is when you write. People write for pleasure, for money, for fame, for influence, for immortality, and etc. Many of the best writers - the ones whose names you remember a hundred or five hundred years later achieved all those things, but for every Shakespeare there are hundreds of writers who had success if you measure ...


3

Nature Or Nurture? (Maybe Both) Of course it is always difficult to separate nature from nurture (was an artist born that way or did the events of her life transform her into the artist she now is). My knock-down, number one favorite book of all time (Make Your Words Work by Gary Provost - amazon link) on teaching writing starts out with the following: ...


2

The use of an Interrobang is perfectly acceptable language usage, and there is no technical reason why it can't be used. However, It would be difficult to assume that all of the readers of the screenplay would understand what the intended meaning is, so you may be better conveying that in a more explicit way. (which is a shame, because I do rather love ...


2

Do you have some other parts of the story worked out? I would just jump ahead for now and write the next scene that you "know". Then, before you know it, you can fill the gap.


2

Short answer: only as much as you need. Which Usually means "not a whole lot." Screenwriting is a collaborative effort. The author needs to write enough for the locale to be "suggestive," but not so much as to take away freedom from the producer. The more "generic" the place (New York, Chicago, Paris, etc.) the less you need to write. Only if the place is ...


2

From a practical production standpoint, it's best to write them as two scenes, because for the newscaster's setting and dialogue, it will need to be shot in a separate studio or building, etc. Aside about style: if you're not going to direct it, eliminate shooting directions except where it's absolutely essential to effectively conveying the story. ...


2

Parenthetical remarks are used to describe the attitude, tone, or action for the actor who is speaking. Stage direction describe whatever's going on on the stage in general. There's a bunch of different "standard" or "accepted" formats used to accomplish it. The name of a character who is speaking should be capitalized and centered, just like in a ...


2

The only real answer here is just doing it. no excuses no rationalizations, no ill write twice as much tomorrow, for 30 days find the most convenient time during your day that you are not going to get interrupted, then spend the first 5-15 minutes getting into the right mindset, read your last paragraph or your outline, fill your mind with your characters ...


2

The two screenwriting books I've read warn that professional reviewers with a stack of scripts "to finish by Monday" start by tossing out the ones that don't conform to established conventions. These scripts tend to be written by inexperienced writers and have a lower likelihood of becoming successful films. Including photographs seems unconventional. If ...


2

but the story involves an enemy who can perfectly anticipate your moves. This happened more than once on Leverage (a totally fun Robin Hood heist-of-the-week show; I highly recommend it). The Leverage crew is made of five bad guys who have gone good and run cons to benefit people. Unfortunately, after a while, each person's reputation becomes known, and ...


2

We could discuss specific solutions to your problem, but I think the general answer is: The ending of a story should be a surprise to the reader ... but not to the writer. I wouldn't spend a lot of time on a story where I have no idea how to make it end. If you come up with an interesting problem for the hero to solve, that's great. That can be a good start ...


2

Write down your good idea. Put pen to paper. Get words on the page. When you have actually written something then you can develop it. If you are not sure what to do next ... sit and think about it. I think when driving or gardening -- times when I don't have to concentrate very hard on something else. Plots, twists in plots, character flaws, etc. often occur ...


2

Obvious answer is to read more novels. At the same time, don't worry about your previous skill set; novels are as much about dialogue as they are prose. Try and have a strong grasp of figurative language while still remaining clear in your description of events. Otherwise I recommend learning to slow the pacing of the story quite a lot. You have time to be ...


2

You have an ability to write screenplays that even you are forced to describe as "pretty spectacular." Given this, and your dislike of descriptive writing, I can't for the life of me understand why you want to make the transition to books. Focus on your screenwriting. A screenplay will typically make you much more money a novel. Current WGA rates start at ...



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