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7

Most people work with the thought in mind that their piece of writing will go on to be well received, and more success will come based around that, so will leave doors open for sequels. However, nobody wants to read an incomplete book. Therefore you will usually find that most things will wrap up quite well at the end, and most plot points will be handled ...


5

There are a number of variations that are recommended in various on-line screenwriting guides, including side-by-side or linearly but using a directive like 'during' At Story Sense they say When writing dialogue in two columns to indicate simultaneous speeches, the left margin of the first dialogue column must be inset slightly. It must not start in the ...


4

...Just the same. Just note that this is open play and not the cutscene. Write all events, but note which part is a cutscene, which is a dialogue, which is plain action, which is a quicktime event... In case of linear games this is very simple, and doesn't differ from typical script by much. Now, in case of games with more advanced plot, the scripts are ...


4

For this script at least, the numbers correspond to the scenes. Each number in the left margin appears at the beginning of a new location. At a guess, this could simply be to make writing easier for the screenwriter, or perhaps to correspond to clapperboard information. These possible uses are only guesses, however. As seen in @Reed's comments, this is ...


4

It's not always so different. There are just a set of rules in hollywood, there isn't really in bollywood. So in bollywood you write as you please and so sometimes it looks more like the hollywood-style, one minute per page format, and other times like a stage-play-script. Sometimes in bollywood there is no dialogue but just a treatment and then someone else ...


3

If I’m understanding you correctly, you have a female character – who is not an MC right now, but a strong secondary character. This character in current WIP is of the Ambassador personality type. Typically this type is described as: Ambassadors will be positive about any change and will be highly aligned, however they will not proactively try to ...


3

Okay, you actually asked three different questions here, so let's break each one down. Are these online course certificates actually recognized by producers, agents, directors, etc., or will having this on your resume make no difference at all? To be quite honest, when it comes to selling a screenplay, you are probably going to start with ...


3

Why should the format of movie scripts from different movie making traditions be the same?!? Here is a typical Italian two column movie script: http://www.cinetecadibologna.it/imageserver/lightboxenlarge/files/biblioteca/sceneggiature/donati/photogallery/la%20grande%20caccia.jpg


3

"Muzak" is also called elevator music. It is characterized by soft, usually slowed, instrumental versions of songs that are typically played in department stores, as hold music, or (per the name) in elevators. They are meant to be soothing and unobtrusive background sounds to avoid what could be uncomfortable silence. It is so named because the company most ...


3

I would actually keep her character intact as a cheerleader. Then in the second, as you reveal more about her character and motivations for overthrowing the current CEO, you can show that her appearance in the original work was a carefully crafted facade, designed to get her to the top as quickly and effortlessly as possible. The exact reasoning, of ...


3

I have been told that the sentence you should cut out is the one you love the most. I have found this true of my own writing: a really interesting section just has to go because it doesn't fit within the whole. Sometimes I have be able to re-cast an idea. Sometimes I have been able to use it in another story or play. Sometimes I have to just throw it away.


3

There is probably no "best" strategy. There many ways to sell scripts but here are some things you can do to help. You have to put yourself into an agent's or producer's shoes. There are tens of thousands of new scripts floating around each year and the vast majority (let's say, conservatively, 80%) are not nearly good enough to produce. People looking for ...


3

I would suggest Blake Snyder's "Save the Cat" and "Save the Cat Goes to the Movies" as some good starting material. I found them to be very useful for understanding story structures in general, particularly those most common in Hollywood. Along these lines, I would suggest not just limiting yourself to comedy-specific advice. The best comedy (IMO) takes ...


3

Sounds like a director/cinematographer's choice more than yours. The screenwriter's role is to build the story, right? So unless that sky has an absolutely irreplaceable effect on the scene (unlikely) or it has strong thematic resonance that truly elevates the work (unlikely) you're getting too focused on details. Even a third-person novelist, who has ...


3

You'd use the character name. Most screenplays are written well before they're cast, so it would be impossible to use the actor name. And even if you knew the actor (like, it was part of a series) you'd use the character name because it's the character saying the line, not the actor. ETA: You can see this, for example, in the screenplay for Empire Strikes ...


3

Just skip to the next plot point and write that. Chances are that later on you'll think of a way to bridge the two, and then you can come back and fill in the details when that happens. I would guess that very few writers proceed sequentially through an entire work. It's good to jump around when you're finding yourself stuck; there's no point in stagnating ...


2

The primary difference between usage in the terms "screenplay" and "script" is the function of the document. The script the actors use during filming is primarily dialogue with minimal stage direction. This is similar to the 'spec scripts' given to agents and producers to generate interest in the work. The primary focus here is on telling the story, the ...


2

A screenplay is written primarily for the production crew, not for the audience, so you don't have to be afraid of spoiling any plot points by mentioning that two apparently different persons are in fact the same character. When you want both the MASKED ASSASSIN and MARTHA MARIGOLD to be portrayed by the same actress, you would refer to both under the same ...


2

Number = Scene Screenplays are usually formatted in such a way that one page roughly equates to one minute, and, in a shooting script, the scenes are numbered. Notes on the length of The Battle of Algiers: A According to the French Wikipedia article, there is a French dubbed version of the movie that is 157 minutes long. Finding out when and why the ...


2

All the screenplays I have seen always use the form of the name that the character is known by to the audience. For example, if you tell the tale of Robert Williams, but all the other characters always address him as "Bob", you use "Bob" as the marker for this character. If, on the other hand, Mr. Williams is a teacher and only his wife calls him "Bob", ...


2

Eh, it's almost impossible to sell screenplays in general. That you have a screenplay for a movie that would be R or NC-17 moves it from "almost" impossible to "very nearly" impossible. You know how many movies were released in 2013 with a NC-17 rating? Two, Blue Is The Warmest Color and something called Lucky Bastard. Which might not sound like much, but ...


2

I've never seen CUT on its own in a script before, so I honestly can't imagine where you'd use it... CUT TO:s are rare in today's scripts. Years ago you'd use them above a new slugline. (Or FADE TO: or DISSOLVE TO: or whatever transition you wanted to use; but these choices are now considered to be the director's prerogative. The transition would always ...


2

Writing one or two examples of the "average" script won't hurt, and it's good practice. I wouldn't do any more, though, because it could all change if and when it goes into development. One thing you should have in order to pitch this project is a simple bible. If they like the pitch they may ask to read the pilot. If they like the pilot they may ask for a ...


2

The biggest different between a novel and a movie is that in a novel, things are described to the reader. The reader can get inside the character's head, be told what the characters are feeling, what the characters and thinking... This doesn't happen in a movie. A movie can only show, not tell. A screenplay has to be entirely visual (and auditory.) This is ...


2

I've tried to do this myself, so I'll pass along what I've learned. First, note that the audience hears a play about one-third as fast (150-200 words per minute) as they read a novel (500-600 words a minute). Because of that, a screenplay requires "crisper" writing, with fewer excess words than a novel. A novel might describe a hero's actions as follows: ...


2

It sounds like you're something of a discovery writer (aka pantser). You wrote lots and lots of material, and now you have to carve away everything which doesn't fit your plot. If you are a discovery writer rather than a planner, then removing all the parts which don't belong there is part of the process of writing your first draft. Keep all the cool bits ...


2

The use of an Interrobang is perfectly acceptable language usage, and there is no technical reason why it can't be used. However, It would be difficult to assume that all of the readers of the screenplay would understand what the intended meaning is, so you may be better conveying that in a more explicit way. (which is a shame, because I do rather love ...


2

Do you have some other parts of the story worked out? I would just jump ahead for now and write the next scene that you "know". Then, before you know it, you can fill the gap.


1

From what I've been told, there are two important parts to a drama: 1) story (or "message" in your words), and 2) characters. That's because the characters are the medium by which your message is conveyed, and the interaction of the characters produces the plot, or "storyline."


1

Typically, you would change all the names and present it as fiction (perhaps as "inspired by a true story"). This is called a roman à clef and it's a widely used technique to allow poetic license with the truth while avoiding legal trouble. Even with this approach, however, people have still been sued, so you might want to use caution.



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