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5

The current fashion in screenwriting is to avoid mentions of camera angles and focus on storytelling, but you can certainly mention POV. Some people do this with a slugline. INT. BEDROOM—DAY BILL'S POV Bill fixes his hair in the mirror. But if you're going to do the trick where a mirror image turns out to be the real one, you don't need to mention POV ...


4

Never put camera angles/shots in your screenplay, it screams amateur. You can however cheat to create visual clues. Example: INT. PRISON - DAY A pair of shackled FEET shuffle down the hallway.


3

There are some good 'from idea to finished book' guides out there. I recommend for example the 10th season of the Writing Excuses podcast, that is built like a master class and leads you through the steps of story-, characters-, and world-creation. http://www.writingexcuses.com/category/season/season-10/ Writers Write just started an 'A novel in a year' ...


2

You have an ability to write screenplays that even you are forced to describe as "pretty spectacular." Given this, and your dislike of descriptive writing, I can't for the life of me understand why you want to make the transition to books. Focus on your screenwriting. A screenplay will typically make you much more money a novel. Current WGA rates start at ...


2

Obvious answer is to read more novels. At the same time, don't worry about your previous skill set; novels are as much about dialogue as they are prose. Try and have a strong grasp of figurative language while still remaining clear in your description of events. Otherwise I recommend learning to slow the pacing of the story quite a lot. You have time to be ...


2

Write down your good idea. Put pen to paper. Get words on the page. When you have actually written something then you can develop it. If you are not sure what to do next ... sit and think about it. I think when driving or gardening -- times when I don't have to concentrate very hard on something else. Plots, twists in plots, character flaws, etc. often occur ...


2

From a practical production standpoint, it's best to write them as two scenes, because for the newscaster's setting and dialogue, it will need to be shot in a separate studio or building, etc. Aside about style: if you're not going to direct it, eliminate shooting directions except where it's absolutely essential to effectively conveying the story. ...


1

I'd force myself to spend 20 or so minutes on only describing one scene or only going through a single character's internal monologue. Stop yourself from going ahead and only work on describing/monologue. Good luck!


1

There are lots of tools that can help with screenplays, such as WriterDuet.com. You can write screenplays with an editor like Word or Notepad, but this tool is easy because it familiarizes you with the ways real screenwriters do their job. It has fade and change camera position presets that automatically type in what you selected. As for books, I use Word ...


1

The more I write, the more problems I discover in the story. I write two or three possible changes to the characters or plot to fix the problems. Then I pick the one that I like best. Sometimes there's only a minor change in the book, but occasionally things need to be seriously worked on. I've had characters that I needed to add in, delete, or completely ...


1

I would start by brainstorming the idea that you have. It is important to develop a complete alignment of your characters outlining their main features and roles in your story. Outline the development of your plot making sure high stakes are set your characters in order to have a strong conflict and resolution pattern.



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