Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Yes, they do. They open with a problem occurring -- an unknown disease that no one can figure out. House has to be conned into taking the case. They sit around a room and throw ideas at each other. All of the ideas are wrong. Patient nears death and no ideas are working. House has a magical epiphany and solves the case. The End. (Also, don't forget the ...


9

For a non-spam answer: I highly recommend Celtx. One of my friends and I decided to write short plays last summer and this was the program I used and I loved it. I found it very easy to use and figure out and I had never really written plays before then. http://www.celtx.com/index.html


9

Ralph certainly covered the structure of individual episodes: the patient's symptoms escalate; the team tries one treatment after another (with dramatic results, in some direction or another); House solves the case. That's a fair description of the single-episode plotline, but there's a lot of other tools in the House arsenal - and ones which, I think, are ...


9

Maybe you shouldn't be writing. Maybe you should be collaborating. Sketch the thing out and hire a partner, or a ghostwriter. Short stories. Fewer words, and less need to create a world. You only need to create as much as is necessary to make the story hold up. Tell stories out loud instead. Find a library which needs volunteers (a bit redundant, I know) ...


9

INT. STARBUCKS, LOS ANGELES People are sitting at tables and on couches, some on smartphones, many typing away on laptops. We pan to a man in his 40's, with a ponytail and reading glasses. He is concentrating fiercely, reading something on a Macbook. JOE (looks up at camera): Oh, hello there! I didn't see you. Welcome to Screenwriter's Corner. Today we ...


8

They do not quit their day job. That's true for many other writers, too. But besides that, yes, they get paid for unused scripts if these scripts were optioned. I. e. a producer pays them money for the exclusive right to the script for a certain amount of time. During that time the producer can think about turning it into a movie without fearing that a ...


8

In the context you've provided, OFF Marie, left stewing now means "this is the last thing the camera sees before it moves off her to the next shot." These are framing directions to the camera person. Look at the parentheticals: PAMELA And it’s not an apartment, it’s a house that you live in? (off Skyler’s nod) Do you own outright, or is there a ...


7

I've written 9 screenplays and have one made into a film, Solitary. I always write directly to screenplay format. It's a terse form that requires you to think and write visually and that form, while restrictive, helps you to create scenes that are short and to the point. Short stories tend to have no restrictions to what you can write and will promote ...


7

1 page = 1 minute That's the reason that all screenplays are written in 12pt courier font and the margins and spacing are strictly adhered to, you can tell how long a film will (probably) be at a glance.


7

If you didn't create an outline — that is, if you didn't know beforehand how it was going to end — then you're suffering from impeded arborvision (you can't see the forest for the trees). 1) Put it in a drawer and don't read it for a month. Come back with fresher eyes. You'd be amazed what you catch. 2) Hand it off to someone else and ask your ...


7

In many cases you don't actually need, or necessarily want, to describe the gesture itself. It is often enough, or even preferable, to (a) convey that there was a gesture and (b) convey its meaning, without describing the gesture. There are at least two reasons for this: The gesture is idiomatic and a specific description would just get in the way. "He ...


6

If this is for a short, I suggest writing a treatment first and trying to shoot directly from it. Improvise. Then, and only then, you'll have a clear idea what you will need further down the road in larger productions. Writing a treatment is basically writing a short story, with a certain structure. Structure depends on your preference, of course. However, ...


6

Screenwriting: http://www.screenwriting.info/ The Complete Idiot's Guide to Screenwriting Playwriting: http://www.scriptfrenzy.org/introtoplaywriting Writing for the Stage: A Practical Playwriting Guide


6

I'm not sure if you're asking how producers make movies based on stories/books or how you could do the same with a story idea you have. For the sake of completeness I'll answer the second one (Shan had an excellent answer for that first case). I've just finished taking a screenwriting module in my degree and that covered the process. First you'd create an ...


6

Your audience is absolutely allowed to know more or less than your main character, but remember to consider how they are being presented the story. If they are watching from just over the main character's shoulder for most of the film and then are pulled away into a scene without him/her, it could be very jarring. Remember that your film has a narrator and ...


6

I think your approach is wrong. Rather than trying to write what you love, you are trying to write for all the market segments. This almost never works. If it was so easy to cater to different market segments with a single book, publishers would have done so by now by using salaried writers. Instead, you not only have vampire novels, but vampire romance, ...


6

It's an excellent idea. Your considerations are quite correct - a first draft can be absolutely terrible; most of its value is in fleshing out general details, structure and plot. It gives you a skeleton framework which you can the edit the heck out of. Therefore, there's no reason to worry if some parts are not all they could be. You know what improvement ...


6

There is nothing new under the sun, my friend. If you read TV Tropes you might be forgiven for thinking that all plots are like all other plots. However it is not the plots (there are considered to be only seven or so actual plots anyway) but the characterisations, details, names etc that make your world unique to you. If you are worried that you have by ...


5

It's extremely, extremely difficult. Not too many people making movies. Lots of people writing screenplays. Gargantuan investment to get a movie made. Not an easy sell. Now, it depends to a large extent on what kind of screenplay you're writing, and what kind of scope you're looking for. If you're aiming for a full-length Hollywood feature, then the odds ...


5

There are a couple of schools of thought about this. Some say that you can add camera directions for effect, some say never. Personally, I would say be very careful about adding any sort of direction because it can be a very slippery slope. If you add it once, you'll be inclined to do it again. Start directing and you'll turn off your readers and ...


5

From what I can tell from some brief research, it is the same format as when writing a script for radio, or television. For example, from this article regarding Comedy Sketch Writing (written by Richard Herring, David Mitchell and Robert Webb): I started my professional career writing topical sketches for the now defunct Radio 4 show Weekending. I ...


5

It's been a while since I've looked into comic scrips, but here's what I remember. There are a lot of differences between a script for a Movie/TV, a stage play and a comic. The biggest one is that in a comic there isn't a director (though the author or artist can fill that role depending on how you work together). In a movie the majority of the camera work ...


5

Comic scripts usually include dialogue and location/background descriptions, maybe some directions for character placement. Movie scripts focus more on these details, and add elements of staging, camera placement and angles, and may have guidelines for post-production sound and visual effects. The biggest challenge is thinking of how to visualize how a scene ...


5

I get the impression that underneath this question is a question about ideal structure. That's too philosophical a topic so you have just presumed such a thing exists and based your question on that presumption. So to reword slightly: "Given the existence of an ideal plot structure and all that goes with it how do I, as a writer, take advantage of that to ...


5

Do it in the description. Compare these two options: SAILORS IN BOAT Hahahahahahahaha. This option tells the actors exactly what they have to say, and it looks clunky. All the sailors in the boat start laughing in unison. This option, on the other hand, gives a good short description of what the actors should do. You can also modify it a bit by having ...


4

Yes, and Ralph Gallagher's answer identifies the pattern pretty well. Why does it make for a popular show? I think it's because it gives audiences something familiar, something they can expect to see every week, while still allowing a lot of room for variety within that structure. Most stories adhere to some kind of structure, whether it's as rigid as the ...


4

From what I know, though Im not an expert: The story or book must have been published, and seen some measure of commercial success, for the producer to have read it. If the producer likes your book, and thinks it can be turned into a movie, they will approach you and offer to buy the movie rights to your book- which means only they can make a movie from that ...


4

If there were a golden way, everyone would do it. They do not want that everyone does it. You can use a literary agent. If they make a deal, they take around 15-20% of what Hollywood will pay you. Google them, google their reputation. Be aware of the indirection. You first have to convince the agent, the agent has to convince the Hollywood guys. And the ...


4

(I'm not a screenwriter, but I've studied the process.) I'm assuming you're talking about writing the script for the short movie, and not for a second feature-length movie. In general, you don't want to start writing your script until you absolutely know your story. There are a number of ways to get your story down: an outline, a treatment (which is ...


4

Here's the money quote from the script formatting rules that cornbread ninja linked in the comments: Some writers also use ALL CAPS when a sound effect appears in Action. Others capitalize important props. This would look like this: MORTIMER groans and pops a handful of aspirin. The tea kettle WHISTLES. Mortimer pulls out a SUB-PARTICLE SUPER ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible