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4

If you used a common method which is known to produce completely random and normally distributed data, just mention its name or describe it in one short sentence. It is often that various methods of random data generation are found to possess some bias, pattern, lesser than maximum possible entropy etc. - their randomness is not perfect. This may affect ...


3

I believe you need a nonbreaking hyphen. It'll keep the characters before and after it from breaking across lines. From Butterick's Practical Typography: Your word proces­sor as­sumes that any hy­phen marks a safe place to flow the text onto a new line or page. Sim­i­lar to the non­break­ing space, the non­break­ing hy­phen looks iden­ti­cal to a ...


3

You haven't mentioned the style guide you're following; different guides have different rules. For Turabian / Chicago Style, the rules applicable are: A single-author entry precedes a multiauthor entry beginning with the same name. and Successive entries by two or more authors in which only the first author’s name is the same are ...


2

Italics are a common way to emphasize words. As such, it's best to use italics sparingly. A text where every proper noun is italicized gets very annoying to read; it'd be like listening to a commercial. If you're writing for a specific publication, check their style guide.


2

I'm a scientist who also does programming. The way I've always done it with my colleagues is this: If the success of your project depends upon my computer code, then I'm a co-author on your FIRST journal paper. After that, if you're just re-using the same code, then I just get an acknowledgement. But if I have to do significant re-coding (not just bug ...


1

A disproportionate researchers fail to write the thesis. The number is so large that there is an acronym for it ABD - All But Dissertation. In general projects (PhD can be thought of as project) fail when there is a large untested block of work to be done at the very end. To succeed in a project that large block must be broken into small chunks that can be ...


1

I would think yes, since "in order" is a bit superfluous, but there are always exceptions in context. You can probably take it out most of the time (like 85 to 90 percent).


1

Italics are used to emphasize words in general writing, but in technical writing you may have to use them for other forms of distinctive treatment. For that reason, I do not use italics (or bold) for emphasis. Generally, I use bold to highlight terms that I think the reader won't know. I only use italics when my style guide calls for them. I generally ignore ...


1

The Style Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2009, pp. 104-106) is very clear on the use of italics. Note especially the bold section (bold emphasis mine): Use italics for titles of books, periodicals, films exception: italic words in the title (reverse italicization) genera, species, and varietes introduction of a new ...



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