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12

When citing large blocks of text like a paragraph, you're probably better off indenting the paragraph, and introducing the text. For example: As How to Indent notes (Billy Bob, 2011): It's better to indent long pieces of text, because then it makes clear that you're quoting a lengthy piece of work. By introducing it with a sentence, you also ...


7

I think you could combine both approaches (directly after and end of book): Directly under give the shorthand solution (just the bottom line of the answer) and at the end of the book give a more complete solution (the full solution). This way, the studends can make sure they have come to the right solution immediately. If they didn't, they can refer to the ...


6

First of all, you should check and see if they have any guidelines posted that will help you to be certain that you stay within their listed range. If they don't have anything listed, then you could send them an inquiry to try to find out. Generally, the word count would not include the title page, if you have one. Words used in tables or graphs, ...


5

Since the book you are translating was not written in the United States, it would be subject to the terms of the Berne Convention, which essentially is an International treaty concerning copyrights. In the simplest of terms, the countries that have signed this treaty basically agree that a copyright is intact until 70 years after the death of the original ...


5

You'll need to contact the original author and/or their publisher. Either one will direct you to the correct person to deal with - there's no blanket rule over who has which rights, so you'll need to check who's got translation rights in your specific case, and whether that person is willing to let you translate the material "officially." Your case is even ...


5

I know this has an accepted answer, but it's from Billy Bob. The APA Guide has the following to say: When writing an entire paragraph about a single study, introduce that paragraph by stating that you will refer to the same study throughout the paragraph, then cite the reference. This avoids awkwardness and redundancy. And as to indenting, this ...


5

Maintainer home page: http://tiswww.case.edu/php/chet/bash/bashtop.html BASH is part of the GNU project: http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/ http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/


4

The sources in the reference list generally validate particular claims that are made in the body of the text. Some style manuals support putting software resources in the reflist, like APA, some don't, like Chicago. In APA (6th ed., section 7.08), the reference should look something like: Free Software Foundation (2007). Bash (3.2.48) [Unix shell ...


4

No, there is no universally accepted standard for this. That doesn't mean there aren't standards you should follow, though. Usually, the set of required fields is dictated by the journal or conference you are publishing in. Many journals have BibTeX styles that will include the required fields for you (as long as they are present in your library, of ...


4

If you used a common method which is known to produce completely random and normally distributed data, just mention its name or describe it in one short sentence. It is often that various methods of random data generation are found to possess some bias, pattern, lesser than maximum possible entropy etc. - their randomness is not perfect. This may affect ...


3

I believe you need a nonbreaking hyphen. It'll keep the characters before and after it from breaking across lines. From Butterick's Practical Typography: Your word proces­sor as­sumes that any hy­phen marks a safe place to flow the text onto a new line or page. Sim­i­lar to the non­break­ing space, the non­break­ing hy­phen looks iden­ti­cal to a ...


3

You haven't mentioned the style guide you're following; different guides have different rules. For Turabian / Chicago Style, the rules applicable are: A single-author entry precedes a multiauthor entry beginning with the same name. and Successive entries by two or more authors in which only the first author’s name is the same are ...


3

I use mind mapping software (Freemind, Freeplane) to organize all of my writing projects. Blocks of text can be imported and then moved around as needed. You get a visual representation of your outline, as well as quick access to any part of your content. Areas that are completed, need content, or are under review are easy to mark with visual icons. When ...


3

As I understand it, the contents for an academic thesis would normally include the main work and appendices only, everything else being additional to the core work that others may wish to refer to. If you look at the list in the previous question, the contents lists everything after itself. The items before are important, but mainly for the university - ...


3

This isn't going to affect the subscription price for readers to purchase the journals, nor will it most likely affect writers in anyway. When a library wants to receive a subscription to a journal or magazine, they have to pay a higher price since more people will be reading them. Even when they purchase books they pay a higher price than an average reader ...


2

Are you quoting it directly, or paraphrasing? I guess you wouldn't bother asking if you were using a direct quote, since that seems crystal-clear - the citation would obviously apply to all the material inside the quotation marks or indented quotation. So you must be paraphrasing... but then you're talking about the last sentence being written by the other ...


2

I think the confusion may be coming from the degree title. It may be that the Master by Research is a masters degree based on existing ( or ongoing ) published research, which is possible, but implies existing published research. Research Publications mean peer-reviewed and published research work, in a set of standard journals (in IT, the ACM is the worlds ...


2

I have written many scientific papers using first person singular and have not had any problems from editors. Many physics journals encourage it as a matter of fact. I will admit that most papers unfortunately do use this convention. Also, as mentioned, when some papers do use first person, they use plural even if there is only one author. I also use "we" ...


2

Solve the first 1 or 2 problems completely right in front of the question, so the student gets an idea of what to do. For the others, give a short answer (like final solution: x = 20) below the question, so students can check if they got the right answer, but put the complete solution at the end. Put reference only if its useful- to an undergraduate. My ...


2

The Chicago Manual of Style specifies Author(s), Year of Publication, Article Title (sentence case, not title case), Journal (italicized), Issue Number followed by a colon followed by the page number(s), thus: Anholt, B. R. and E. E. Werner. 1995. Interaction between food availability and predation mortality mediated by adaptive behavior. Ecology 76:2230-34 ...


2

Communicating complicated information can be done better using short sentences, not long ones. It also is easier to check short sentences for clarity and accuracy than to check long ones. Rather than trying to squeeze an explanation that should be a page or two long into a single sentence, aim at writing accurate short sentences. In the above, I suggested ...


2

I doubt that there is an actual rule as you describe. In scientific circles, many people typeset their work using the LaTeX typesetting engine because of its good support for mathematical equations and so on, and because it sort of adheres to a principle of separating design from content. The LaTeX typesetting engine uses the concept of image and table ...


2

Italics are a common way to emphasize words. As such, it's best to use italics sparingly. A text where every proper noun is italicized gets very annoying to read; it'd be like listening to a commercial. If you're writing for a specific publication, check their style guide.


2

I'm a scientist who also does programming. The way I've always done it with my colleagues is this: If the success of your project depends upon my computer code, then I'm a co-author on your FIRST journal paper. After that, if you're just re-using the same code, then I just get an acknowledgement. But if I have to do significant re-coding (not just bug ...


1

A disproportionate researchers fail to write the thesis. The number is so large that there is an acronym for it ABD - All But Dissertation. In general projects (PhD can be thought of as project) fail when there is a large untested block of work to be done at the very end. To succeed in a project that large block must be broken into small chunks that can be ...


1

I would think yes, since "in order" is a bit superfluous, but there are always exceptions in context. You can probably take it out most of the time (like 85 to 90 percent).


1

Italics are used to emphasize words in general writing, but in technical writing you may have to use them for other forms of distinctive treatment. For that reason, I do not use italics (or bold) for emphasis. Generally, I use bold to highlight terms that I think the reader won't know. I only use italics when my style guide calls for them. I generally ignore ...


1

The Style Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2009, pp. 104-106) is very clear on the use of italics. Note especially the bold section (bold emphasis mine): Use italics for titles of books, periodicals, films exception: italic words in the title (reverse italicization) genera, species, and varietes introduction of a new ...


1

I believe that you are over-generalising. Figures and tables OFTEN appear at the top of a new page because of the requirement not to split them over page breaks. That does NOT mean that they must be placed there if there is enough space on the previous page to enable them to be placed where they fall naturally in the text. In a paper with many small ...


1

I do not know the etymological or cultural roots of using the passive voice/ third person. However, the reason we were given [the reason they gave us], and that sounded to us as perfectly understandable, was that active voice unnecessarily [and undesirably] shifts the focus onto an extraneous element, at least in some instances. Consider these: "An ...



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