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The term you want is verisimilitude. Basically, you want to avoid breaking the readers suspension of disbelief. This means that what happens must be consistent to the rules of what can happen that the reader has accepted for the setting. If the story is set in the real world, this is close, but not identical, to realism. You'd still be expected to adhere to ...


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Internal consistency is the key. Build your world and how it works and play by your own rules.... I remember a book which had two types of magicians whose who worked with magic and those that worked with the rules that magic followed... a little weird but it worked because when the way magic worked changed you knew why and how, and in this case it was all ...


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I think you will still have a sense of realism. As long as you explain the physics laws/magic laws/whatever differs before they take effect, the reader will know why/how things are happening. As long as your definitions are clear, detailed, and consistent with the effects, you should be fine. Consider: Any novel that deals with magic has an unknown set of ...


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Realism has several components. Different ones dominate in different genres/settings and among individual readers. (Real) setting accuracy: If you're describing a real place or a time in history, people who know something about that will respond based on how closely you match what they know. If there isn't a lot of noise and traffic on your mid-day NYC ...



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